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IRWGS

Co-sponsor;“Is Gender Violence Governable?”

October 13, 2016 - 4:30pm - 6:30pm

Panel Discussion with Dubravka Zarkov (International Institute of Social Studies (ISS), Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands) and Rema Hammami (Institute for Women’s Studies, Birzeit University, OPT); (CSSD event) 

Death Beyond Disavowal: The Impossible Politics of Difference with Grace Hong

September 13, 2016 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext

In this talk based on her recently published book Death Beyond Disavowal: The Impossible Politics of Difference, Grace Kyungwon Hong mobilizes “difference” as theorized by women of color feminists to analyze works of cultural production by people of color as expressing a powerful antidote to the erasures of contemporary neoliberalism. Death beyond Disavowal finds the memories of death and precarity that neoliberal ideologies attempt to erase. 

Grace Kyungwon Hong is Professor of Gender Studies and Asian American Studies at UCLA, where she teaches courses on women of color feminism, comparative and relational race theory, and race, gender, and neoliberalism. In addition to her most recent book, from which this talk is drawn, she is the author of The Ruptures of American Capital: Women of Color Feminism and the Culture of Immigrant Labor (University of Minnesota Press, 2006) and the co-editor (with Roderick Ferguson) of Strange Affinities: The Gender and Sexual Politics of Comparative Racialization (Duke University Press, 2011). She is also the co-editor of the "Difference Incorporated" book series at the University of Minnesota Press.

IRWGS Grad Colloquium with Willemijn Krebbekx: What (else) can Sex Education do?

May 5, 2016 - 4:00pm - 6:00pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext
Please join us for the final meeting of the IRWGS Graduate Colloquium for the academic year with Willemijn Krebbekx, a PhD Candidate in Anthropology at the University of Amsterdam.  In her study ‘Sexualities and Diversities in the Making’ she questions conceptions of sexuality and youth, based on ethnographic research in four schools in the Netherlands. In her analysis she combines insights of STS and anthropology to understand the object that is sexuality and the effects it creates.
 
Comprehensive sex education (CSE) has been heralded as the right way to do sex education. It is informed by theory, and proven to improve sexual health by effect studies.To think sex education outside these intervention logics, this paper asks: What else can sex education do? Three cases from ethnographic fieldwork into sexuality in secondary schools in the Netherlands trouble the separations that CSE relies on between the present and the future, between learning and doing, and between the individual adolescent and the collective peer group. The analysis shows that sex education is a collective practice that does not (only) affect future health of individuals, but brings about other effects, such as that of race, gender and popularity. 
 

Joint Senior Thesis Presentation

May 3, 2016 - 4:00pm - 6:15pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext

Co-Sponsor; Master Class With Mai Masri & Mira Nair

April 26, 2016 - 6:00pm - 8:30pm
612 Schermerhorn, Columbia University

Beirut-based Palestinian documentary filmmaker Mai Masri will screen her first feature film, 3000 Nights (3000 Layla) at Columbia University, for its New York premiere. Inspired by the true story of a young Palestinian mother who gave birth to her child in an Israeli prison, 3000 Nights is a story about resilience and the imagination in a genre -- the prison genre-- that has rarely dealt with women’s experiences, let alone Palestinian women’s. Set in Nablus in 1980, Masri draws on realities she has both experienced first hand and explored in her earlier documentary work. Shot in a real prison in a cinema verité style with handheld cameras, the film has a raw documentary edge that resonates with the reality it portrays. What is it like to raise a child behind bars? How do women survive, educate each other, suspect and support each other in prison? What happens in this unique situation in which Palestinian political prisoners mix with Israeli women incarcerated on criminal charges? Screened first at the BFI London Film Festival and recently at festivals in Toronto, Ramallah and Geneva, 3000 Nights has been described as “a poetic, compelling and raw allegory for freedom under occupation.” Prison is a widespread collective experience for Palestinians, but not only Palestinians. The film just received the Young Jury Prize at the International Film Festival on Human Rights in Geneva. Masri’s reputation as a leading Palestinian documentary filmmaker rests on her award-winning films that include Beirut Diaries, Frontiers of Dreams and Fears, Children of Shatila, Children of Fire, Wild Flowers: Women of South Lebanon and several films made with Jean Chamoun including Suspended Time. Q & A with the director follows the screening, moderated by Professor Hamid Dabashi, editor of Dreams of a Nation: On Palestinian Cinema. There will be a Master Class with Mai Masri the following evening. In the Master Class, open to all students and faculty, Mai Masri will discuss her experiences and approach to filmmaking, show clips from her films, and talk with Mira Nair about moving from documentary to fiction and about women directors. Mira Nair began in documentary but has gone on to make many award-winning feature films including Salaam Bombay, Monsoon Wedding, Vanity Fair, The Namesake, and The Reluctant Fundamentalist. This event is sponsored by the Center for Palestine Studies as part of Palestine Cuts, its film initiative. The two events are co-sponsored by the Center for Justice, the Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality, the Middle East Institute, and the Columbia School of the Arts.

 
For more information, click here.
 

Co-Sponsor; 3000 Nights: New York Premiere With Director Mai Masri

April 25, 2016 - 7:00pm - 9:00pm
Lecture Hall at The Journalism School, Columbia University

Beirut-based Palestinian documentary filmmaker Mai Masri will screen her first feature film, 3000 Nights (3000 Layla) at Columbia University, for its New York premiere. Inspired by the true story of a young Palestinian mother who gave birth to her child in an Israeli prison, 3000 Nights is a story about resilience and the imagination in a genre -- the prison genre-- that has rarely dealt with women’s experiences, let alone Palestinian women’s. Set in Nablus in 1980, Masri draws on realities she has both experienced first hand and explored in her earlier documentary work. Shot in a real prison in a cinema verité style with handheld cameras, the film has a raw documentary edge that resonates with the reality it portrays. What is it like to raise a child behind bars? How do women survive, educate each other, suspect and support each other in prison? What happens in this unique situation in which Palestinian political prisoners mix with Israeli women incarcerated on criminal charges? Screened first at the BFI London Film Festival and recently at festivals in Toronto, Ramallah and Geneva, 3000 Nights has been described as “a poetic, compelling and raw allegory for freedom under occupation.” Prison is a widespread collective experience for Palestinians, but not only Palestinians. The film just received the Young Jury Prize at the International Film Festival on Human Rights in Geneva. Masri’s reputation as a leading Palestinian documentary filmmaker rests on her award-winning films that include Beirut Diaries, Frontiers of Dreams and Fears, Children of Shatila, Children of Fire, Wild Flowers: Women of South Lebanon and several films made with Jean Chamoun including Suspended Time. Q & A with the director follows the screening, moderated by Professor Hamid Dabashi, editor of Dreams of a Nation: On Palestinian Cinema. There will be a Master Class with Mai Masri the following evening. In the Master Class, open to all students and faculty, Mai Masri will discuss her experiences and approach to filmmaking, show clips from her films, and talk with Mira Nair about moving from documentary to fiction and about women directors. Mira Nair began in documentary but has gone on to make many award-winning feature films including Salaam Bombay, Monsoon Wedding, Vanity Fair, The Namesake, and The Reluctant Fundamentalist. This event is sponsored by the Center for Palestine Studies as part of Palestine Cuts, its film initiative. The two events are co-sponsored by the Center for Justice, the Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality, the Middle East Institute, and the Columbia School of the Arts.

 
For more information, click here.
 

Grad Colloquium with Cara Rock-Singer

April 12, 2016 - 6:15pm - 7:30pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext

Cara Rock-Singer, a PhD Candidate in the Religion Department, will present "'I see you, and you are enough': Grassroots Jewish Feminism in the Mikveh," a chapter from her dissertation Jewish Women's Bodies and the Body Politic: American Jewish Women's Scientific And Religious Authority. This chapter asks, how did a ritual most widely associated with purification after menstruation, requiring the vulnerable act of naked immersion certified by a witness, come to be central to transnational Jewish feminist activism? Based on ethnographic research in New York, Boston, and Jerusalem, this presentation will explore how Jewish feminists have birthed the mikveh anew, as a site for women’s health, the democratization of Jewish textual education, and the development of alternative forms of women’s leadership.

Feminist & Queer Pedagogy Workshop

April 8, 2016 - 11:00am - 1:00pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext

Feminist & Queer Pedagogy Workshop

Join IRWGS DGS Ellie Hisama (Music) and a panel of graduate student instructors for a discussion of the challenges and rewards of teaching material addressing gender & sexuality and what it means to teach from a feminist and/or queer perspective. The workshop will consider the principles behind what it means to lead a classroom from a feminist and queer standpoint as well as practical strategies for implementing these principles and navigating issues which frequently arise in such a classroom. Topics might include managing conflict over matters perceived to be personal or ideological, taking account of diversity in the classroom, teaching “triggering” material, and the benefits and drawbacks of instructors being open about their own identity.

Both faculty and graduate students are welcome to attend, and we invite perspectives from those who have taught both in and outside the university setting. Though attendees are not required to prepare anything in advance, we encourage you to bring in any questions or comments which this forum offers the opportunity for addressing. Refreshments (including a bagel brunch) will be provided.

Theory Salon with Branka Arsic, "Affirmative Reading” from new book Bird Relics

April 18, 2016 - 4:00pm - 5:30pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext

Theory Salon with Branka Arsic on "Affirmative Reading” from new book Bird Relics (Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University)

Branka Arsić will be leading a discussion on “Affirmative Reading,” the introductory chapter from her recent book Bird Relics: Grief and Vitalism in Thoreau (Harvard 2016). Prof. Sarah Cole (Chair of English and Comparative Literature), Paula Hopkins (ENCL), and Valeria Tsygankova (ENCL) will be responding. All interested graduate students and faculty are welcome to come. Light refreshments will be provided. 

If you’d like to attend lease email IRWGS Graduate Fellows Elizabeth Dolfi (efd2110@columbia.edu)  or Victoria Wiet (vcw2106@columbia.edu) for a copy of the reading.

The Politics of Female Circumcision in Egypt: Gender, Sexuality and the Construction of Identity by Maria Malmström: Book Launch and Panel

April 11, 2016 - 5:00pm - 6:30pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext

The Politics of Female Circumcision in Egypt: Gender, Sexuality and the Construction of Identity by Maria Malmström : Book Launch and Panel

 

co sponsored by MESAAS, Anthropology

 

The percentage of women aged 15-49 in Egypt who have undergone the procedure of female circumcision, or genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) stands at 91%, according to the latest research carried out by UNICEF. Female circumcision has become a global political minefield with 'Western' interventions affecting Egyptian politics and social development, not least in the area of democracy and human rights. Maria Frederika Malmstrom employs an ethnographic approach to this controversial issue, with the aim of understanding how female gender identity is continually created and re-created in Egypt through a number of daily practices, and the central role which female circumcision plays in this process. Viewing the concept of 'agency' as critical to the examination of social and cultural trends in the region, Malmstrom explores the lived experiences and social meanings of circumcision and femininity as narrated by women from Cairo. It is through the examination of the voices of these women that she offers an analysis of gender identity in Egypt and its impact on women's sexuality.

 

Panelists:

 

Maria Frederika Malmström

Visiting Associate Professor

Department of Anthropology /IRWGS

Columbia University

 

Beth Baron

Director

Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center

The Graduate Center, CUNY

 

Katherine Ewing

Professor of Religion

Columbia University

 

Lisa Rubin

Associate Professor of Psychology

The New School for Social Research

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