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IRWGS

Co-Sponsor; Black Girl Movement: A National Conference

April 7, 2016 - 5:00pm - April 9, 2016 - 7:00pm
Varies (see link)

“Black Girl Movement: A National Conference” is a three-day gathering at Columbia University in New York City to focus on Black girls, cis, queer, and trans girls, in the United States.   Bringing together artists, activists, educators, policymakers, and black girls leaders themselves, this first national conference on Black girls seeks to address the disadvantages that Black girls in the United States face, while creating the political will to publicly acknowledge their achievements, contributions, and leadership.

For more information, please visit conference website here.

Feminist Media(tions): What is "Beyoncé Feminism"?

April 14, 2016 - 4:30pm - 6:00pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext

Over the past several years, Beyoncé has become increasingly labeled as a feminist icon in popular culture, with increasingly overt political messages conveyed in both her music and persona. How do we, as listeners and consumers of popular media, read Beyoncé's politics? Is she the feminist icon of our generation? In this talk, we will explore Beyoncé's past and present politics, as well as compare her messages to those of her contemporaries, in order to better understand what Beyoncé's feminism says about our own.

Feminist Media(tions)

March 28, 2016 - 4:30pm - 6:30pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext

with Rebecca Teich, Nicola Douglas, and Vanessa Sauter

Student Run Discussions and Screenings!

Co-Sponsor; Is the ‘Post-‘ In Post Identity the Same As The ‘Post-‘ In Post-Genre?: Race & Pop Music Aesthetics with Robin James

March 25, 2016 - 12:15pm - 2:15pm
622 Dodge Hall

Is the ‘Post-‘ In Post Identity the Same As The ‘Post-‘ In Post-Genre?: Race & Pop Music Aesthetics with Robin James (Associate Professor of Philosophy and Women & Gender Studies at UNC Charlotte); co-sponsored by IRAAS, Music, IRWGS

Alondra Nelson, The Social Life of DNA: Book Launch and Panel Discussion

February 29, 2016 - 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Deutsche Haus

Alondra Nelson, The Social Life of DNA: Book Launch and Panel Discussion (Dean of Social Science, Faculty of Arts and Sciences); co sponsored by IRAAS, University Seminar on Cultural Memory

IRWGS Grad Colloquium: Spectral Narrative as Historical Revision in Edwidge Danticat’s The Farming of Bones and Boubacar Boris Diop’s Murambi: The Book of Bones with Nicole Gervasio

March 3, 2016 - 4:00pm - 6:00pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext

Spectral Narrative as Historical Revision in Edwidge Danticat’s The Farming of Bones and Boubacar Boris Diop’s Murambi: The Book of Bones

Nicole Gervasio

This paper addresses one of the major topics at stake in my larger literary dissertation project as well as contemporary postcolonial feminist criticism: the ethics of representing "unspeakable" acts of violence, like state-sponsored genocide, in imaginative fiction as a politically resistant effort to "rewrite" official histories. Using two recent novels from Senegal and Haiti as a lens, I track these authors' unique representational strategies for working against the grain of collective amnesia in global cultural memory. Boubacar Boris Diop's Murambi: The Book of Bones brings to life the much-remembered Rwandan genocide of 1994, whereas Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones puts a story to the contrastingly forgotten Parsley Massacre of 1937 in the Dominican Republic. In my view, by grounding their hyperrealist novels in the fictionalized testimonies of women who survived these atrocities, Danticat and Diop spectralize what we think we know of these histories. These authors retell "the facts" in suppressed voices that force us to blur the binary oppositions that traditionally oversimplify our knowledge as Westerners-- boundaries between personal memory vs. national pasts, victims vs. perpetrators, and individual nightmares vs. collective realities.

IRWGS Grad Colloquium: The Starving Bedlamite and the Jacobean Stage with Andrea Crow

February 15, 2016 - 6:00pm - 7:30pm
754 Schermerhorn Ext

Andrea Crow

"The Starving Bedlamite and the Jacobean Stage"

In this chapter, I identify and attempt to make sense of a new character that appeared on the Jacobean stage: the starving Bedlamite. I trace how this character developed in relation to precedents in rogue pamphlets, various theatrical genres (especially the humors comedy), and current scandals at the real Bedlam, Bethlem Hospital. I argue that the starving Bedlamite forged a conceptual link through which diet could be understood as a tool for both materially and ideologically shaping bodies, organizing them into populations, and attempting to control those populations. Focusing on Dekker and Middleton's The Honest Whore, Part 1 and John Fletcher's The Pilgrim, I demonstrate how these plays use the starving Bedlamite to think through the implications of the relationship between diet and power.

“Becoming Feral — Sex, Death and Falconry” with Jack Halberstam

February 25, 2016 - 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Butler Library, Room 523

“Becoming Feral — Sex, Death and Falconry” with Jack Halberstam (Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Comparative Literature and Gender Studies; University of Southern California)

"Bodies of Testimony: Biographical Fragments, Photographic Feelings" with Juana Maria Rodriguez

February 11, 2016 - 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Jerome Greene Hall, Columbia Law School

"Bodies of Testimony: Biographical Fragments, Photographic Feelings" with Juana Maria Rodriguez (Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies, UC-Berkeley)

“Love Objects, Everyday Life” with Ann Pellegrini

February 8, 2016 - 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Butler Library, Room 523

“Love Objects, Everyday Life” with Ann Pellegrini (Professor of Performance Studies and Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts)

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