Fall 2019 Courses

WMST Courses

WMST UN1001 Intro to Women’s & Gender Studies

Days and times: M/W 1:00 pm – 2:25 pm

Call number: 09911

Points: 3

Instructors: Manijeh Moradian, Jack Halberstam

Description: N/A

 

WMST BC1051 Women and Health

Days and times: M 4:10 pm – 5:25 pm

Call number: 09909

Points: 3

Instructor: Rebecca Jordan-Young

Description: N/A

 

WMST BC2140 Critical Approaches

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40 am – 12:55 pm

Call Number: 09904

Instructors: Alexander Pittman

Points: 3

Description: N/A

 

WMST UN3311 Feminist Theory

Days and times:  Th 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm

Call number: 09913

Points: 4

Instructor: Alexander Pittman

Description: N/A

 

WMST V3312 Theorizing Activism

Days and times: Tu 10:10 am – 12:00 pm

Call number: 09906

Points: 4

Instructor: Kimberly Springer

Description: N/A

 

WMST UN3450 Topics in Gender and Sexuality Law

Days and times: Th 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Instructors: Suzanne Goldberg

Call number: 

Points: 3

Description: As society shifts in its views about sexuality and gender, so too does the law.  Indeed, legal developments in this area have been among the most dynamic of the past couple of decades.  Yet law does not map easily or perfectly onto lived experience, and legal arguments do not necessarily track the arguments made in public debate. In this seminar, we will explore the evolving jurisprudence of sexuality and gender law in a variety of areas.  Our goal throughout the semester will be to understand and think about these issues as lawyers do – with our primary focus on understanding and evaluating the arguments that can be made on both (or all) sides of any particular case, with some attention to the factors outside of the courtroom that might shape how courts approach their work.  Related to this, we will also seek to understand how and why some of the jurisprudence has changed over time.

 

WMST BC3513 Critical Animal Studies

Days and times: W 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Instructors: Janet Jakobsen

Call number: 09912

Points: 4

Description: N/A

 

WMST UN3521 Senior Seminar I

Days and times: W 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Instructors: Saidiya Hartman

Call number: 63377

Points: 4

Description: The Senior Seminar in Women’s Studies offers you the opportunity to develop a capstone research paper by the end of the first semester of your senior year. Senior seminar essays take the form of a 25-page paper based on original research and characterized by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of women, sexuality, and/or gender. You must work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of your thesis and who can advise you on the specifics of method and content. Your grade for the semester will be determined by the instructor and the advisor. Students receiving a grade of “B+” or higher in Senior Seminar I will be invited to register for Senior Seminar II by the Instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies.  Senior Seminar II students will complete a senior thesis of 40-60 pages. Please note, the seminar is restricted to Columbia College and GS senior majors.

 

WMST UN3525 Senior Seminar: Knowledge, Practice, Power

Days and times: W 10:10 am – 12:00 pm

Call number: 09907

Points: 4

Instructor: Manijeh Moradian

Description: N/A

 

WMST UN3813 Colloquium on Feminist Inquiry

Days and times: W 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm

Call Number: 09903

Points: 4

Instructor: Janet Jakobsen

Description: N/A

 

WMST UN3915 Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective

Days and times: Th 10:10 am – 12:00 pm

Call Number: 63378

Points: 4

Instructor: Selina Makana

Description: N/A

 

WMST GU4000 Genealogies of Feminism: The Subject(s) of Rights

Days and times: M 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm

Call Number: 63379

Points: 4

Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod

Description: The rights of women and sexual minorities have been central to feminist theory and activism. What is the genealogy of “rights talk”? What is its feminist genealogy? As the liberal language of rights has become hegemonic, in particular through international instruments that have linked women’s and sexual rights to human rights and as liberal reform goes global, what is hidden from view? What understandings are foreclosed? What politics are blocked? This course will examine these key questions by exploring feminist and other critiques of liberal paradigms; considering alternative languages and practices for emancipation, and reflecting on assumptions about the human embedded in liberalism, including the idea of human development and capability. We will track the issues by focusing in particular on changing approaches to violence against women (VAW) and gender based violence (GBV).

This course is open to all graduate students and meets the requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Feminist Studies. Priority will be given to those fulfilling the certificate. It is not open to undergraduates.

 

WMST W4308 Sexuality & Science

Days and times: Tu 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Call Number: 09910

Points: 4

Instructor: Rebecca Jordan-Young

Description: N/A

 

WMST GR8001 Grad Student and Faculty Colloquium: Feminist Pedagogy

Days and times: Tu 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm

Call Number: 63380

Points: 1

Instructor: Saidiya Hartman

Description: N/A

 

WMST GR8010 Advanced Topics: Significant Others

Days and times: Th 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Call Number: 63381

Points: 4

Instructor: Mana Kia

Description: What is the relationship between homoeroticism and homosociality? How does this relationship form conceptions of gender and sexuality in ways that might be historically unfamiliar and culturally or regionally specific? We pursue these questions through the lens of friendship and its relationship to ideas and expressions of desire, love, and loyalty in pre-modern times. We begin by considering the intellectual basis of the modern idea of friendship as a private, personal relationship, and trace it back to earlier times when it was often a public relationship of social and political significance. Some of these relationships were between social equals, while many were unequal forms (like patronage) that could bridge social, political or parochial differences.

Thinking through the relationships and possible distinctions between erotic love, romantic love and amity (love between friends), we will draw on scholarly works from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, particularly philosophy, sociology, political theory, literature, history, and art history. We will attend to friendship’s work in constituting, maintaining and challenging various social and political orders in a variety of Asian contexts (West, Central, South and East Asian), with reference to scholarship on European contexts. Primary source materials will include philosophy, religious manuals, autobiographies, popular love stories, heroic epics, mystical poetry, mirror for princes, paintings, material objects of exchange, and architectural monuments.