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Fall 2019 Courses

WMST Courses

WMST UN1001 Intro to Women’s & Gender Studies

Days and times: M/W 1:00 pm – 2:25 pm

Call number: 09911

Points: 3

Instructors: Manijeh Moradian, Jack Halberstam

Description: An interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts and analytical categories in women’s and gender studies. This course grapples with gender in its complex intersection with other systems of power and inequality, including: sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and nation. Topics include: feminisms, feminist and queer theory, commodity culture, violence, science and technology, visual cultures, work, and family.

 

WMST BC1050 Women and Health

Days and times: M 4:10 pm – 5:25 pm

Call number: 09909

Points: 3

Instructor: Rebecca Jordan-Young

Description: Interdisciplinary introduction emphasizing interaction of biological and sociocultural influences on women’s health, and exploring health disparities among women as well as between women and men. Current biomedical knowledge presented with empirical critiques of research and medical practice in specific areas such as occupational health, cardiology, sexuality, infectious diseases, reproduction, etc.

 

WMST BC2140 Critical Approaches

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40 am – 12:55 pm

Call Number: 09904

Instructors: Alexander Pittman

Points: 3

Description: Introduction to key concepts from social theory as they are appropriated in critical studies of gender, race, sexuality, class and nation. We will explore how these concepts are taken up from different perspectives to address particular social problems, and the effects of these appropriations in the world.

 

WMST UN3311 Feminist Theory

Days and times:  Th 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm

Call number: 09913

Points: 4

Instructor: Alexander Pittman

Description: Prerequisites: LIMITED TO 20 BY INSTRUC PERM; ATTEND FIRST CLASS An exploration of the relationship between new feminist theory and feminist practice, both within the academy and in the realm of political organizing.

 

WMST V3312 Theorizing Activism

Days and times: Tu 10:10 am – 12:00 pm

Call number: 09906

Points: 4

Instructor: Kimberly Springer

Description: Prerequisites: LIMITED TO 20 BY INSTRUC PERM; ATTEND FIRST CLASS An exploration of the relationship between new feminist theory and feminist practice, both within the academy and in the realm of political organizing.

 

WMST UN3450 Topics in Gender and Sexuality Law

Days and times: Th 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Instructors: Suzanne Goldberg

Call number: 

Points: 3

Description: As society shifts in its views about sexuality and gender, so too does the law.  Indeed, legal developments in this area have been among the most dynamic of the past couple of decades.  Yet law does not map easily or perfectly onto lived experience, and legal arguments do not necessarily track the arguments made in public debate. In this seminar, we will explore the evolving jurisprudence of sexuality and gender law in a variety of areas.  Our goal throughout the semester will be to understand and think about these issues as lawyers do – with our primary focus on understanding and evaluating the arguments that can be made on both (or all) sides of any particular case, with some attention to the factors outside of the courtroom that might shape how courts approach their work.  Related to this, we will also seek to understand how and why some of the jurisprudence has changed over time.

 

WMST BC3513 Critical Animal Studies

Days and times: W 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Instructors: Janet Jakobsen

Call number: 09912

Points: 4

Description: N/A

 

WMST UN3521 Senior Seminar I

Days and times: W 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Instructors: Saidiya Hartman

Call number: 63377

Points: 4

Description: The Senior Seminar in Women’s Studies offers you the opportunity to develop a capstone research paper by the end of the first semester of your senior year. Senior seminar essays take the form of a 25-page paper based on original research and characterized by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of women, sexuality, and/or gender. You must work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of your thesis and who can advise you on the specifics of method and content. Your grade for the semester will be determined by the instructor and the advisor. Students receiving a grade of “B+” or higher in Senior Seminar I will be invited to register for Senior Seminar II by the Instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies.  Senior Seminar II students will complete a senior thesis of 40-60 pages. Please note, the seminar is restricted to Columbia College and GS senior majors.

 

WMST UN3525 Senior Seminar: Knowledge, Practice, Power

Days and times: W 10:10 am – 12:00 pm

Call number: 09907

Points: 4

Instructor: Manijeh Moradian

Description: Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to senior majors. The Senior Seminar in WGSS offers you the opportunity to develop a capstone research project during the first semester of your senior year. The capstone project may be freestanding, or, with permission of the instructor, may be continued during the spring semester as a Senior Thesis.  The capstone project must be based on original research and involve an interdisciplinary approach to the study of women, sexuality, and/or gender. You must work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of your project and who can advise you on the specifics of method and content. Your grade for the semester with be determined by the Senior Seminar instructor in consultation with your advisor.

 

WMST UN3813 Colloquium on Feminist Inquiry

Days and times: W 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm

Call Number: 09903

Points: 4

Instructor: Janet Jakobsen

Description:Prerequisites: WMST V1001 and the instructor’s permission. A survey of research methods from the social sciences and interpretive models from the humanities, inviting students to examine the tension between the production and interpretation of data. Students receive firsthand experience practicing various research methods and interpretive strategies, while considering larger questions about how we know what we know.

 

WMST UN3915 Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective

Days and times: Th 10:10 am – 12:00 pm

Call Number: 63378

Points: 4

Instructor: Selina Makana

Description: Prerequisites: Instructor approval required Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally, as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work and trafficking, feminist politics, and human rights. , If it is a small world after all, how do forces of globalization shape and redefine both men’s and women’s positions as as workers and political subjects? And, if power swirls everywhere, how are transnational power dynamics reinscribed in gendered bodies? How is the body represented in discussions of the political economy of globalization? These questions will frame this course by highlighting how gender and power coalesce to impact the lives of individuals in various spaces including workplaces, the home, religious institutions, refugee camps, the government, and civil society, and human rights organizations. We will use specific sociological and anthropological case studies, to look at how various regimes of power operate to constrain individuals as well as give them new spaces for agency.This course will enable us to think transnationally, historically, and dynamically, using gender as a lens through which to critique relations of power and the ways that power informs our everyday lives and identities.

 

WMST GU4000 Genealogies of Feminism: The Subject(s) of Rights

Days and times: M 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm

Call Number: 63379

Points: 4

Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod

Description: The rights of women and sexual minorities have been central to feminist theory and activism. What is the genealogy of “rights talk”? What is its feminist genealogy? As the liberal language of rights has become hegemonic, in particular through international instruments that have linked women’s and sexual rights to human rights and as liberal reform goes global, what is hidden from view? What understandings are foreclosed? What politics are blocked? This course will examine these key questions by exploring feminist and other critiques of liberal paradigms; considering alternative languages and practices for emancipation, and reflecting on assumptions about the human embedded in liberalism, including the idea of human development and capability. We will track the issues by focusing in particular on changing approaches to violence against women (VAW) and gender based violence (GBV).

This course is open to all graduate students and meets the requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Feminist Studies. Priority will be given to those fulfilling the certificate. It is not open to undergraduates.

 

WMST W4308 Sexuality & Science

Days and times: Tu 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Call Number: 09910

Points: 4

Instructor: Rebecca Jordan-Young

Description: N/A

 

WMST BC4325 Embodiment and Bodily Difference 

Days and times: Tu 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm

Call Number: 09914

Points: 4

Instructor: Elizabeth Bernstein

Description: At once material and symbolic, our bodies exist at the intersection of multiple competing discourses, including the juridical, the techno-scientific, and the biopolitical. In this course, we will draw upon a variety of critical interdisciplinary literatures—including feminist and queer studies, science and technology studies, and disability studies—to consider some of the ways in which the body is constituted by such discourses, and itself serves as the substratum for social relations. Among the key questions we will consider are the following: What is natural about the body? How are distinctions made between presumptively normal and pathological bodies, and between psychic and somatic experiences?  How do historical and political-economic forces shape the perception and meaning of bodily difference? And most crucially: how do bodies that are multiply constituted by competing logics of gender, race, nation, and ability offer up resistance to these and other categorizations?

 

WMST GU4350 Performing Feminist Activisms in Contemporary Latin America

Days and times: Th 12:10 pm – 2:00 pm

Call Number:

Points: 4

Instructor: Maria Contreras

Description: This course explores different ways in which feminist artists and activists use performance to spark social change in Latin America. Using feminism and performance studies as critical lenses, this course addresses how performative actions can challenge patriarchal systems in neoliberal times. We begin the course by reviewing key texts to discuss the key terms “feminisms”, “performance” and “activisms” Then, the course turns to an examination of contemporary feminist activisms in Latin America, including the #niunamenos movement in Argentina, the 2018 feminist tsunami in Chile and the work of Mujeres Creando in Bolivia. In each session, we will discuss the performative strategies activists use to denounce, protest and resist dominant discourses of power, neoliberalism and gender violence, searching to trace connectivities and fractures among different contemporary feminist activist movements across Latin America.

 

WMST GR8001 Grad Student and Faculty Colloquium: Feminist Pedagogy

Days and times: Tu 4:10 pm – 6:00 pm

Call Number: 63380

Points: 1

Instructor: Saidiya Hartman

Description: This is a course is oriented to graduate students who are thinking about issues in teaching in the near and distant future and want to explore forms of pedagogy. The course will ask what it means to teach “as a feminist” and will explore how to create a classroom receptive to feminist and queer methodologies and theories regardless of course theme/content. Topics include: participatory pedagogy, the role of political engagement, the gender dynamics of the classroom, modes of critical thought and disagreement. Discussions will be oriented around student interest. The course will meet 4-5 times per SEMESTER (dates TBD) and the final assignment is to develop and workshop a syllabus for a new gender/sexuality course in your field.  Because this course is required for graduate students choosing to fulfill Option 2 for the Graduate Certificate in Feminist Studies at IRWGS, priority will be given to graduate students completing the certificate.

 

WMST GR8010 Advanced Topics: Significant Others

Days and times: Th 2:10 pm – 4:00 pm

Call Number: 63381

Points: 4

Instructor: Mana Kia

Description: What is the relationship between homoeroticism and homosociality? How does this relationship form conceptions of gender and sexuality in ways that might be historically unfamiliar and culturally or regionally specific? We pursue these questions through the lens of friendship and its relationship to ideas and expressions of desire, love, and loyalty in pre-modern times. We begin by considering the intellectual basis of the modern idea of friendship as a private, personal relationship, and trace it back to earlier times when it was often a public relationship of social and political significance. Some of these relationships were between social equals, while many were unequal forms (like patronage) that could bridge social, political or parochial differences.

Thinking through the relationships and possible distinctions between erotic love, romantic love and amity (love between friends), we will draw on scholarly works from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, particularly philosophy, sociology, political theory, literature, history, and art history. We will attend to friendship’s work in constituting, maintaining and challenging various social and political orders in a variety of Asian contexts (West, Central, South and East Asian), with reference to scholarship on European contexts. Primary source materials will include philosophy, religious manuals, autobiographies, popular love stories, heroic epics, mystical poetry, mirror for princes, paintings, material objects of exchange, and architectural monuments.

Crosslisted Courses

AMST W3930 Gender History and American Film

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: Hillary-Anne Hallett

Points: 4

Call Number: 62736

Description: TBD

ANTH GR6653 Porous Bodies

Days and times: TBD

Instructor: Vanessa Agard Jones

Points: TBD

Call Number: TBD

Description: How are bodies in the world? How is the world in bodies? Building from these deceptively simple questions, ours will be an interdisciplinary reading seminar on how bodies (mostly human, but sometimes nonhuman) are made and remade in and through their environments and via their relationships to the material world. Privileging porosity as a rubric, we consider the ever-permeable boundaries between bodies and the other beings (be they viral, chemical, microbial or otherwise) with which they become entangled. Alongside the monographs under study, we will tackle article-length engagements with theories of new feminist/queer materialisms, decolonial and critical science studies. Further, a key aim of this course is to provide students the opportunity to hone some of the most important skills we have in our toolbox as academics, relative to our teaching, our public voice/s as critics, and to our own research.

HIST UN2533 US Lesbian & Gay History

Days and times: M/W 11:40am-12:55pm

Instructor: George Chauncey

Points: 4

Call Number: 36472

Description: This course explores the social, cultural, and political history of lesbians, gay men, and other socially constituted sexual and gender minorities, primarily in the twentieth century. Since the production and regulation of queer life has always been intimately linked to the production and policing of “normal” sexuality and gender, we will also pay attention to the shifting boundaries of normative sexuality, especially heterosexuality, as well as other developments in American history that shaped gay life, such as the Second World War, Cold War, urbanization, and the minority rights revolution. Themes include the emergence of homosexuality and heterosexuality as categories of experience and identity; the changing relationship between homosexuality and transgenderism; the development of diverse lesbian and gay subcultures and their representation in popular culture; the sources of antigay hostility; religion and sexual science; generational change and everyday life; AIDS; and gay, antigay, feminist, and queer movements.

PHIL UN2533 Philosophy and Feminism

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40am-12:55pm

Instructor: Christia Mercer

Points: 3

Call Number: 45516

Description: Is there an essential difference between women and men? How do questions about race conflict or overlap with those about gender? Is there a “normal” way of being “queer”? Introduction to philosophy and feminism through a critical discussion of these and other questions using historical and contemporary texts, art, and public lectures. Focus includes essentialism, difference, identity, knowledge, objectivity, and queerness.

 

PORT UN3601 Race, Medicine, and Literature in 19th Century Brazil

Days and times: M/W 1:10 – 2:25pm

Instructor: Ana Paulina Lee

Points: 3

Call Number: 13152

Description: This course introduces students to major scientific, racial, and cultural theories that marked nineteenth-century Brazilian society. We will read and discuss how racial ideologies like “whitening” and “miscegenation” played critical roles in shaping policy during Brazil’s transition to a republic. Throughout, we will analyze literature, illustrations, and photography that constructed a relationship between race and public health to better understand the role that eugenics and racial theories played in constructing discourses about gender, sexuality, liberalism, and national identity. We will read a range of works by authors, politicians, scientists, sociologists, and abolitionists and examine their contributions to movements such as romanticism, naturalism, positivism, and social realism, among others in literary and visual works to gain a vivid picture of Brazilian society in the early stages of nation building.  In turn, we will discuss how these new understandings may help us address contemporary challenges in Brazil and beyond. Course will be taught in Portuguese or English, depending on students’ preference.

Related Courses in other Departments

AFEN BC3815 The Worlds of Ntozake Shange and Digital Storytelling

Days and times: Th 12:10pm-2:00pm

Instructor: Kim Hall

Points: 4

Call Number: 06751

Description: Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 12 students. Permission of the instructor required. Interested students should complete the application at http://bit.ly/Ntozake2019. Students should have taken a course beyond the intro level from ONE of the following areas: American Literature (through the English Department), Africana Studies, American Studies, Theatre or Women’s Studies. Students who successfully complete into this course will be eligible to take the second half of the course in Spring 2019. NOTE: There will be three extra sessions scheduled in the Digital Humanities Center. A poet, performance artist, playwright and novelist, Ntozake Shange’s stylistic innovations in drama, poetry and fiction and attention to the untold lives of black women have made her an influential figure throughout American arts and in Feminist history.  This semester will examine Shange’s works in the context of political and artistic organizing by women of color in the 1970s and 80s. In addition to our analysis of primary texts, students will be introduced to archival research in Ntozake Shange’s personal archive at Barnard College.  This in-depth exploration of Shange’s work and milieu is complemented with an introduction to digital tools, public research and archival practice. You can find more information and apply for the course at http://bit.ly/Ntozake2019. On Twitter @ShangeWorlds

AFRS BC3110 The Africana Colloquium: Caribbean Women

Days and times: Tu 12:00pm-1:50pm

Instructor: Kim Hall

Points: 4

Call Number: 06754

Description: Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Priority will be given to Africana majors and CCIS students (Africana Studies, American Studies and Women’s Studies majors; minors in Race and Ethnic Studies).

AFRS BC3585 Poor in America: The Experience and Impact of Financial Deprivation

Days and times: Th 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructor: Rose Razaghian

Points: 4

Call Number: 06756

Description: This course focuses on the life experiences and impact of poverty in the contemporary United States.  We will be exploring the consequences of financial and material deprivation on work, housing, health, parenting, children, as well as the limits and opportunities for inter-generational mobility and how each of these intersect with gender, racial and ethnic identities.  We will be learning about the experiences of individual persons as well as how these particular experiences reflect the overarching patterns of social, political and economic trends in the United States.  The course will incorporate a diverse set of disciplinary perspectives to shed light on the challenges faced by persons living in poverty.  In addition, there will be an emphasis on learning about and critically assessing methodological approaches applied in the literature.  No prior knowledge of methods is required and any technical references will be explained in class.

CLPS G4200 Freud

Days and times: Th 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructor: Marcus Coelen

Points: 3

Call Number: 20190

Description: Because of advances in feminist theory, infant research, clinical practice attachment theory and historical scholarship, a consensus has emerged concerning Freud’s oeuvre over the past fifty years: the figure of the mother is largely absent from all aspects of his thinking. This includes his self-self analysis, case histories, theory of development and account of religion and civilization. This fact will provide our point of reference for examining the development of Freud’s thought. We will first explore the biographical roots of this lacuna in Freud’s thinking. We will then see how it played itself out as his long and abundant career unfolded. We will examine texts regarding all the aspects of his thinking and from the different periods of his life.

CPLS W4145 Facism: Aesthetics and Politics

Days and times: M 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: Diane Rubenstein

Points: 4

Call Number: 20191

Description: The election of President Donald Trump has renewed interest in the examination of fascism- as an ideology, as a political movement and as a form of governance. Our inquiry into the nature of fascism will primarily focus on Western European cases- some where it remained an intellectual movement (France), and others such as Italy and Germany where it was a ruling regime. Fascism will be discussed in many dimensions- in its novelty as the only new “ism” of the twentieth century, in its relation to nascent technology (radio and film), its racial and gendered configurations, in its relation to (imperialist) war. We will explore the appeal of this ideology to masses and to the individual. Who becomes a fascist? What form of inquiry provides the best explanations? Can art- literature and film- somehow render what social science cannot? Can fascism outlive the century in which it was born and occur in the 21st century?

EAAS W4226 Gender, Class and Real Estate in Urbanizing China

Days and times: M 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: Leta Hong Fincher

Points: 4

Call Number: 44524

Description: This is a seminar for advanced undergraduates and master’s degree students, which explores the socioeconomic consequences of China’s development of a boom, urban residential real-estate market since the privatization of housing at the end of the 1990s. We will use the intersecting lenses of gender/sexuality, class and race/ethnicity to analyze the dramatic new inequalities created in arguably the largest and fastest accumulation of residential-real estate wealth in history. We will examine topics such as how skyrocketing home prices and state-led urbanization have created winners and losers based on gender, sexuality, class, race/ethnicity and location (hukou), as China strives to transform from a predominantly rural population to one that is 60 percent urban by 2020. We explore the vastly divergent effects of urban real-estate development on Chinese citizens, from the most marginaliz4d communities in remote regions of Tibet and Xinjiang to hyper-wealthy investors in Manhattan. Although this course has no formal prerequisites, it assumes some basic knowledge of Chinese history. If you have never taken a course on China before, please ask me for guidance on whether or not this class is suitable for you. The syllabus is preliminary and subject to change based on breaking news events and the needs of the class.

ECON W4480  Gender and Applied Economics

Days and times: M/W 5:40pm-6:55pm

Instructor: Lena Edlund

Points: 3

Call Number: 47417

Description: Prerequisites: ECON UN3211 and ECON UN3213 This course studies gender gaps, their extent, determinants and consequences. The focus will be on the allocation of rights in different cultures and over time, why women’s rights have typically been more limited and why most societies have traditionally favored males in the allocation of resources.

ENGL W3398  Odd Women in Victorian England

Days and times: Tu 6:10pm-8:00pm

Instructor: Sharon Marcus

Points: 4

Call Number: 10196

Description: How do people find freedom within restrictive norms and laws? Victorian England, known for its rigid definitions of femininity, nonetheless produced a remarkable number of female outlaws, eccentrics, and activists: spinsters, feminists, working women, cross-dressers, women in “female marriages.” “Odd Women in Victorian England,” an undergraduate seminar, will explore the pains and pleasures of gender non-conformity through the lens of nineteenth-century literary works, historical documents, and foundational texts in gender and sexuality studies. Readings will include the diaries of Anne Lister, a lesbian libertine; a slander case involving accusations of lesbianism at an all-girls school; the diaries of Hannah Munby, a servant whose upper-class lover fetishized her physical strength; the autobiographies of Annie Besant, socialist and birth-control activist, and Mary Seacole, a nurse who traveled the world; and three major works of Victorian fiction: Aurora Leigh, a narrative poem by Elizabeth Barrett Browning; Villette, a novel by Charlotte Bronte; and Little Dorrit, a novel by Charles Dickens. The course will end with a late 20th-century historical novel that draws on several of the works we will read in the course: Affinity by Sarah Waters.

ENGL W3520  Introduction to Asian American Literature and Culture

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40am-12:55pm

Instructor: Denise Cruz

Points: 3

Call Number: 40447

Description: This course is a survey of Asian North American literature and its contexts.  To focus our discussion, the course centers on examining recurring cycles of love and fear in Asian North American relations from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. We will first turn to what became known as “yellow peril,” one effect of exclusion laws that monitored the entrance of Asians into the United States and Canada during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the corresponding phenomenon of Orientalism, the fascination with a binary of Asia and the West. The second section of the course will focus on how Asian North American authors respond to later cycles of love and fear, ranging from the forgetting of Japanese internment in North America and the occupation of the Philippines; to the development of the model minority mythology during the Cold War. The final section will examine intimacies and exclusions in contemporary forms of migration, diaspora, and community communities.

CSER W1040  Critical Approaches to the Study of Ethnicity and Race

Days and times: M 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: Jennifer Lee

Points: 4

Call Number: 18671

Description: This course provides an introduction to central approaches and concepts animating the investigation of race and ethnicity. We will not treat either of these categories of difference as a given, nor as separable from other axes of social difference. Rather, we will apply an interdisciplinary and intersectional framework to illuminate how these concepts have come to emerge and cohere within a number of familiar and less familiar socio-cultural and historical contexts. We will consider how racial and ethnic differentiation as fraught but powerful processes have bolstered global labor regimes and imperial expansion projects; parsed, managed, and regulated populations; governed sexed and gendered logics of subject and social formation; and finally, opened and constrained axes of self-understanding, political organization, and social belonging. Special attention will be given to broadening students’ understanding of racial and ethnic differentiation beyond examinations of identity. Taken together, theoretical and empirical readings, discussions, and outside film screenings will prepare students for further coursework in race and ethnic studies, as well as fields such as literary studies, women’s studies, history, sociology, and anthropology.

CSER W3922  Race and Representation in Asian American Cinema

Days and times: Th 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructor: Eric Gamalinda

Points: 4

Call Number: 57871

Description: This seminar focuses on the critical analysis of Asian representation and participation in Hollywood by taking a look at how mainstream American cinema continues to essentialize the Asian and how Asian American filmmakers have responded to Hollywood Orientalist stereotypes. We will analyze various issues confronting the Asian American, including yellowface, white patriarchy, male and female stereotypes, the “model minority” myth, depictions of “Chinatowns,” panethnicity, the changing political interpretations of the term “Asian American” throughout American history, gender and sexuality, and cultural hegemonies and privileging within the Asian community.

CSER W4360  American Diva: Gender and Performance

Days and times: Tu 10:10pm-12:00pm

Instructor: Deborah Paredez

Points: 4

Call Number: 57877

Description: What makes a diva a diva? How have divas shaped and challenged our ideas about American culture, performance, race, space, and capital during the last century? This seminar explores the central role of the diva—the celebrated, iconic, and supremely skilled female performer—in the fashioning and re-imagining of racial, gendered, sexual, national, temporal, and aesthetic categories in American culture. Students in this course will theorize the cultural function and constitutive aspects of the diva and will analyze particular performances of a range of American divas from the 20th and 21st centuries and their respective roles in (re)defining American popular culture.

HRTS W4360  Introduction to Human Rightsa

Days and times: M/W 2:40pm-3:55pm

Instructor: Andrew J Nathan

Points: 3

Call Number: 57007

Description: Evolution of the theory and content of human rights; the ideology and impact of human rights movements; national and international human rights law and institutions; their application with attention to universality within states, including the U.S., and internationally.

HRTS W4650  Children’s Rights Advocacy

Days and times: F 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: Jo Backer & Michael Bochenek

Points: 3

Call Number: 56980

Description: This course is designed to introduce contemporary children’s rights issues and help students develop practical advocacy skills to protect and promote the rights of children. Students will explore case studies of advocacy campaigns addressing issues including juvenile justice, child labor, child marriage, the use of child soldiers, corporal punishment, migration and child refugees, female genital mutilation, and LBGT issues affecting children. Over the course of the semester, students will become familiar with international children’s rights standards, as well as a variety of advocacy strategies and avenues, including use of the media, litigation, and advocacy with UN, legislative bodies, and the private sector. Written assignments will focus on practical advocacy tools, including advocacy letters, op-eds, submissions to UN mechanisms or treaty bodies, and the development of an overarching advocacy strategy, including the identification of goals and objectives, and appropriate advocacy targets and tactics.

PSYC G4615 The Psychology of Culture and Diversity

Days and times: W 10:10am-12:00pm

Instructor: Valerie J Purdie-Greenaway

Points: 4

Call Number: 99675

Description: A comprehensive examination of how culture and diversity shape psychological processes. The class will explore psychological and political underpinnings of culture and diversity, emphasizing social psychological approaches. Topics include culture and self, cuture and social cognition, group and identity formation, science of diversity, stereotyping, prejudice, and gender. Applications to real-world phenomena discussed.

RELI W3521 Muslim Masculinities

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40am-12:55pm

Instructor: Derek Mancini-Lander

Points: 4

Call Number: 54124

Description: This interdisciplinary course explores a variety of Muslim modes of masculinity as they have developed over time and as they have varied across different regions of the Islamic World. Students examine and problematize the social and cultural construction of masculinity in various parts of the Islamic world, including in the Middle East, South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, and in the Muslim diasporas of Europe and the Americas. In trying to understand the complex ways in which men and manhood are made in Islamic societies we will center our attention on the perceptions of bodily and social differences in Muslims’ larger articulations of gender and sexuality. A particular focus will be on the relationship between masculinity and violence against women and non-Muslims.

SPAN BC3151 Spanish Film: Cinematic Representation of Spain

Days and times: Tu/Th 2:40pm-3:55pm

Instructor: Wadda Rios-Font

Points: 3

Call Number: 09658

Description: Prerequisites: Third-year bridge course (W3300), and introductory surveys (W3349, W3350). Examination of Spanish film in both theoretical and historical terms. Considers political and ideological changes through the 20th century and their repercussions in cinematic representation. Topics include: surrealism and Bunuel’s legacy; representations of Franco and the civil war; censorship and self-censorship; gender, sexualities, and national identities; film, literature relations.

AFRS BC3001 Politics of Gender in Contemporary South Africa

Days and times: TBD

Instructor: TBD

Points: TBD

Call Number: TBD

Description: This module is designed to offer mid-senior level students with an interest in African Studies an intensive engagement with the politics of gender and sexualities in specific African contexts of the c21. Although the module will include discussion of aspects of the sexual and gendered operations of colonial praxis, the concentration will be on the ways in which post-flag democracy cultures have taken up the question of gender and sexualities. We will explore debates on the representation and realities of lesbian and transgendered experiences, the meaning of race-based identity-politics within “new” democracies, the narratives of “the body” as they emerge through medical and religious discourses on “women,”  and discourses of “e-masculinization” and militarism.     Note that this course will only run from September 16th through September 30th.

AMSTS BC1041 Critical Approaches to the Study of Race and Ethnicity

Days and times: Tu 12:10pm-2:00pm

Instructor: Jordan Camp

Points: 4

Call Number: 00121

Description: This seminar will introduce students to critical theories of race and ethnicity. It will familiarize students will interdisciplinary scholarship on power and difference, with a special focus on the historically specific relationships between race, capitalism, empire, dispossession, migration, political economy, and the U.S. state’s regulation of gender and sexuality. Throughout the course, students will consider the political and economic critiques of race and power that have been articulated by antiracist freedom, anticolonial, feminist, queer of color, and immigrant labor struggles.

AHIS BC3123 Woman and Art

Days and times: TBD

Instructor: TBD

Points: TBD

Call Number: TBD

Description: Discussion of the methods necessary to analyze visual images of women in their historical, racial, and class contexts, and to understand the status of women as producers, patrons, and audiences of art and architecture.

ACLS BC3450 Women and Leadership

Days and times: Th 12:10pm-2:00pm

Instructor: Sylvie R. Honig & Sarit Abramowicz

Points: 4

Call Number: 06710

Description: Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Limited to 15. Examination of the social conditions and linguistic practices that have shaped the historical and contemporary gendering of leadership, power, and authority in the United States and around the world. Through examples drawn from the social, political, and economic worlds, we will explore leadership in varying racial, class, and regional contexts.

ENGL BC1210 First Year Writing: Critical Conversation: Women and Culture

Days and times: M/W 11:40am-12:55pm

Instructor: Vrinda Condillac

Points: 3

Call Number: 07989

Description: “Re-vision—the act of looking back, of seeing with fresh eyes, of entering an old text from a new critical direction—is for women more than a chapter in cultural history: it is an act of survival. “ Adrienne Rich, “When We Dead Awaken: Writing as Re-Vision.” This course offers a revisionist response to the constraints of “the canon,” wherein women are often portrayed as peripheral characters, their power confined to the islands of classical witches and the attics of Romantic madwomen. The Women and Culture curriculum challenges traditional dichotomies that cast gender as an essential attribute rather than a cultural construction, and interrogates the categories of both “woman” and “culture” themselves. No two syllabi are exactly the same, but works studied in the fall term readings include Hymn to Demeter; Ovid, Metamorphoses; Sei Shonagon, The Pillow Book; Marie de France, Lais; Kebra Negast; Shakespeare, sonnets; Beauty and the Beast; West African Bride Myth; and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, selected poetry. Spring term readings include Milton, Paradise Lost; Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman; Luisa Valenzuela, selected stories; Eliza Haywood, Fantomine; Lady Hyegyong, The Memoirs of Lady Hyegyong; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Emily Dickinson, selected poetry; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway or A Room of One’s Own; Alice Walker, In Search of Our Mother’s Gardens ; and Yvette Christiansë, Castaway. Critical scholarship sources include Sara Ahmed, Gloria Anzaldua, Judith Butler, Laura Mulvery, and Michel Foucault.

ENGL BC3032 Women and Writing Early Modern France

Days and times: Tu/Th 2:40pm-3:55pm

Instructor: Laurie Postlewate

Points: 3

Call Number: 08238

Description: Examination of cultural and literary phenomena in 15th through 17th century France, focusing on writings by and about women. FREN BC1204: French Intermediate II or the equivalent level is required.

HIST BC2567 Women, Gender and Sexuality in the 20th Century U.S

Days and times: M/W 10:10am-11:25am

Instructor: Premilla Nadasen

Points: 3

Call Number: 08607

Description: Using an intersectional framework, this course traces changing notions of gender and sexuality in the 20th century United States.  The course examines how womanhood and feminism were shaped by class, race, ethnicity, culture, sexuality and immigration status.  We will explore how the construction of American nationalism and imperialism, as well as the development of citizenship rights, social policy, and labor organizing, were deeply influenced by the politics of gender.  Special emphasis will be placed on organizing and women’s activism.

HIST BC2681 Women and Gender in Latin America

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40am-12:55pm

Instructor: Nara Milanich

Points: 3

Call Number: 08606

Description: TBD

POLS BC3521 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

Days and times: Tu 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructor: Paula A Franzese

Points: 3

Call Number: 09166

Description: POLS W1201 or the equivalent. Not an introductory-level course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC3326. Enrollment limited to 25 students; L-course sign-up through eBear. Barnard syllabus. Explores seminal caselaw to inform contemporary civil rights and civil liberties jurisprudence and policy.  Specifically, the readings examine historical and contemporary first amendment values, including freedom of speech and the press, economic liberties, takings law, discrimination based on race, gender, class and sexual preference, affirmative action, the right to privacy, reproductive freedom, the right to die, criminal procedure and adjudication, the rights of the criminally accused post-9/11 and the death penalty. (Cross-listed by the American Studies and Human Rights Programs.)

PSYC BC3153 Psychology and Women

Days and times: M 11:00am-12:50pm

Instructor: Wendy McKenna

Points: 4

Call Number: 09316

Description: Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and at least two psychology courses. Permission of the instructor required for majors other than Psychology or Women’s Studies. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Examines how female experience is and has been understood by psychologists. Through an understanding of gender as a social construction and issues raised by the intersections of gender, sexuality, class, and race, the course will analyze assumptions about what causes us to be gendered and about how being gendered affects behavior.

RELI W4514 Defining Marriage

Days and times: Tu 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructor: Gale Kenny

Points: 4

Call Number: 09448

Description: This seminar examines the changing purpose and meaning of marriage in the history of the United States from European colonization through contemporary debates over gay marriage. Topics include religious views of marriage, interracial marriage, and the political uses of the institution.

WMST BC3131 Women and Science

Days and times: TBD

Instructor: TBD

Points: TBD

Call Number: TBD

Description: History and politics of women’s involvement with science. Women’s contributions to scientific discovery in various fields, accounts by women scientists, engineers, and physicians, issues of science education. Feminist critiques of biological research and of the institution of science.

SOCI BC3935 Gender and Organizations

Days and times: TBD

Instructor: TBD

Points: TBD

Call Number: TBD

Description: This course examines the sociological features of organizations through a gender lens. We will analyze how gender, race, class, and sexuality matter for individuals and groups within a variety of organizational contexts. The course is grounded in the sociological literatures on gender and organizations.

SOCI BC4028 Gender and Inequality in Familyand Organizations

Days and times: TBD

Instructor: TBD

Points: TBD

Call Number: TBD

Description: In-depth, critical exploration of  changing expectations and patterns of socialization for women and men in contemporary U. S. families.  Draws from family studies, gender studies, and LGBT studies to understand how gendered forces work to structure relations between and among family members.  Readings highlight socioeconomic, racial and ethnic variations in patterns of behavior, at times critiquing assumptions and paradigms drawn from the experiences of traditional, middle-class nuclear families. Topics include division of household labor in same-sex and different-sex couples, adolescent experiences growing up disadvantaged, what happens to undocumented immigrant children when they reach adulthood, gender inequality in wealthy white families, and ethnic differences in men’s expected roles in families.

THTR V3140 Performing Women

Days and times: W 12:10pm-2:00pm

Instructor: Shayoni Mitra

Points: 4

Call Number: 09742

Description: Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 16 students. This course examines the category of “woman” as it is mobilized in performance, considering both a variety of contemporary performances chosen from a wide range of genres and a diversity of critical/theoretical perspectives.

THTR V3160 Queer Performance

Days and times: Tu 12:10pm-2:00pm

Instructor: Paige M Johnson

Points: 4

Call Number: 09761

Description: This course surveys key theoretical and historical writings in the field of Queer Performance, both within and without Theatre and Performance Studies, as well as significant dramatic and performance works in the field. Beginning with an introduction to queer theory and questions surrounding gender and sexuality in performance, the course then moves into contemporary theories to examine works that use embodiment to question constructions of gender and sexuality onstage. Performances are regarded as provocations: what constitutes queer performance? Is sexuality all we mean by queer? What are the historical, aesthetic, and political aspects of queer performance? We will also pursue questions of practice and production: Where is queer performance staged and how is it received? How is it produced, for whom, by whom, and with what funding? Is queer performance inherently or even necessarily radical? The course explores cross cultural performances, as well as performances spanning from theatrical stages to ritual to everyday performance.  Course fulfills one course in the “dramatic literature/theatre studies/performance studies” requirement for the Theatre/Drama and Theatre Arts major.

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