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WMST courses

WMST 1001 Intro to Women's and Gender Studies **CORE COURSE**

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40 am - 12:55 pm
Location: 614 Schermerhorn Hall
Points: 3

An interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts and analytical categories in women's and gender studies. This course grapples with gender in its complex intersection with other systems of power and inequality, including: sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and nation. Topics include: feminisms, feminist and queer theory, commodity culture, violence, science and technology, visual cultures, work, and family.

WMST 3311 Feminist Theory

Days and times: T 9-10:50am
Instructors: Tina Campt
Location: TBA
Points: 4

Explores the relationship between new feminist theory and feminist practice, both within the academy and in the realm of political organizing. Limited to 20 by instructor permission; attend first class.

WMST 3514 Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions: The Intimacies of Racial Slavery **CORE COURSE**

Days and times: W 10:10a - 12p
Instructors: Saidiya V Hartman
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Points: 4

Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions examines issues of gender and sexuality across time and space. We explore how feminist analyses may reorient how we think about the past. We also ask how historical perspectives can bring the contingent and contextual nature of ideas about gender and sexuality into relief. We will consult both primary and secondary historical sources as well as key theoretical texts on the politics of women's history and the history of sexuality in intersection with other forms of identity and inequality.

WMST 3522 Senior Seminar II

Days and times: T 4:10 - 6p
Instructors: Marianne Hirsch
Location: 752 Schermerhorn Ext

Individual research in Women's Studies conducted in consultation with the instructor. The result of each research project is submitted in the form of the senior essay and presented to the seminar.

WMST 3890 From Exclusion to Inclusion? Sexuality and Citizenship in American Politics

Days and times: W 4:10 - 6pm
Instructors: Justin Phillips
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Points: 4

For much of the 20th century, the American political system excluded lesbians and gay men from full citizenship.  This course seeks to understand the political and social forces shaping the transformation of these sex nonconformists from a pariah group into a viable social movement and eventually into a powerful constituency within the Democratic Party.  Special emphasis will be placed on the state’s role in defining lesbian and gay identities, the ways in which gender and racial diversity have shaped the LGB movement, and the role that partisan electoral strategies played in ushering sexuality to the center of American political conflict.

WMST 3915 Gender and Power in Transnational Perpsective

Days and times: Tu 2:10-4pm
Location: TBA
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or the instructor's permission. Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally, as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work and trafficking, feminist politics, and human rights. Attend first class for instructor permission.

WMST 3940 Queer Theories **CORE COURSE**

Days and times: T 4:10 - 6p
Instructors: Elizabeth A. Povinelli
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Points: 4

This course examines a genealogy of contemporary debates in queer theory beginning with feminist debates on sexuality and power in the 1970s and moving through critical race theory, the rise of antinormativity, affect theory, and posthumanism. Will fulfill Feminist Theory requirement.

WMST BC3125 Pleasures and Power: Intro to Sexuality Studies

Days and times: M W 6:10-7:25p
Location: LL104 Diana Center
Points: 3

Instructor: Alex Pittman

WMST G4000 Genealogies of Feminism: Significant Others

Days and times: M 2:10 - 4pm
Instructors: Mana Kia
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext

What is the relationship between homoeroticism and homosociality? How does this relationship form conceptions of gender and sexuality in ways that might be historically unfamiliar and culturally or regionally specific? We pursue these questions through the lens of friendship and its relationship to ideas and expressions of desire, love, and loyalty in pre-modern times. We begin by considering the intellectual basis of the modern idea of friendship as a private, personal relationship, and trace it back to earlier times when it was often a public relationship of social and political significance. Some of these relationships were between social equals, while some were unequal forms (like patronage) that could bridge social, political or parochial differences.Thinking through the relationships and possible distinctions between erotic love, romantic love and amity (love between friends), we will draw on scholarly works from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, particularly philosophy, sociology, political theory, literature, history, and art history. We will attend to friendship’s work in constituting, maintaining and challenging various social and political orders in a variety of Asian contexts (West, Central, South and East Asian), with reference to scholarship on European contexts. Primary source materials will include philosophy, religious manuals, autobiographies, popular love stories, heroic epics, mystical poetry, mirror for princes, paintings, material objects of exchange, and architectural monuments.

WMST G4440 Gender and Affective Politics: Hate, Fear and Love in the MENA region

Days and times: F 10:10a - 12p
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext

Instructor: Maria Frederika Malmström 

The course will examine how masculinities and femininities are produced, remade, expressed and negotiated through theories of materiality and affect and relate them to relevant ethnographic examples of such processes (for example masculine soundscapes and edible portraits of Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi on chocolate pralines). We will explore gender in relation to the multifaceted dynamic processes unfolding in North Africa in the aftermath of earlier political fluxes, as well as today’s instabilities and unrest and tomorrow’s politics. Materiality and non-discursive forces, what can be called affective politics, impact our sense of belonging and desire for comfort in times of chaos, religious and political instability. Specifically we will focus on forces of affect and the material aspects of its public manifestation—the materiality of affect—through tangible manifestations of affects of passion: hate and love: two opposed but interlinked “emotions of revolution”, as well as their sibling, fear. The same material experiences can produce materialized emotions such as love or hate depending on specific political and social positioning within the larger polity. Passion is at once a phenomenological state and an extremely fluid currency of social, political and economic transaction. The experience of passion morphs continuously, changing valence while passing from hand to hand, body to body, circumstance to circumstance.

WMST G6001 Theoretical Paradigms in Feminist Scholarship: Sex Work and Trafficking

Days and times: T 2:10 - 4:00pm
Instructors: Carole Vance
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
This seminar examines contemporary issues of sex work and trafficking into forced prostitution, with emphasis on implications for human rights and health. The class explores the use of ethnographic and social research methods in producing complex and culturally grounded descriptions of diverse combinations of work, sexuality, migration, and exploitation, globally and in the US. The seminar also considers the relationship between social research and the development of policy and interventions. 
 
Historical background, gender theory, and current legal frameworks are also examined.
 
Prerequisite: introductory class in gender or sexuality studies, or introduction to human rights.
 
*Enrollment by permission of the instructor, email instructor directly csv1@columbia.edu

Crosslisted courses

AFAS G4080 Topics in the Black Experience:Reading Black Girls

Days and times: Tu 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructors: Farah Jasmine Griffin
Location: 237 Milbank Hall (Barnard)
Call number: 61347
Points: 4

This seminar coincides with Black Girl Movement:  A National Conference, which will be held at Columbia University on April 7-April 9, 2015.   We will read an interdisciplinary selection of scholarly and creative texts that center the experience of Black girls in the United States.   In addition to reading and class discussion, students will help to build a website that serves as a bibliographic resource for future study.  Students will also serve as volunteers, hosts and ambassadors for Conference participants.  Conference attendance is required.  The course will culminate in a final group project that assesses the current state of research and writing on black girls and suggests directions for future scholarship and policy initiatives.

ANTH 1200 The Anthropology of Sexuality

Days and times: M W 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructors: Carole Vance
Location: 467 Schermerhorn Hall
Call number: 12167
Points: 3

This course offers a broad overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic dimensions of sexuality. It focuses on the rapid transformations that are taking place globally in the early 21st century, and on the impact that these transformations have had on sexuality. The relationships between men, women and children are changing quickly, as are traditional family structures and gender norms. What were once viewed as private matters have become public, and an array of new social movements (transgender, intersex, sex worker, people living with HIV) have come into the open. Sexuality has become a focus for public debate and political action in important new ways that will be examined in detail in this course.

CLEN 3972 Feminism and Disability Studies

Days and times: W 2:10pm-4pm
Instructors: Rachel E. Adams
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Call number: 98097
Points: 4

This course studies the intersection of feminism and disability studies as a critical problem, a theoretical rubric, and a site of cultural production.  These fields have much in common, including the fact that both grew out of movements for rights and social justice, take the body as a key area of concern, and are concerned with intersectionality of such terms as gender, ability, race, ethnicity, and class.  However, they have not always been in dialogue.  In this course, we will consider the evolution and key questions behind each field, where they overlap and disagree, and what might be gained through a productive conjunction of the two.  We will study the sometimes competing perspectives of feminism and disability on debates over reproductive choice, dependency and care, and the representation of the non-normative body as we seek strategies for intersection and reconciliation.  We will begin by assuming a close connection between aesthetic and social/political representation, putting narratives in a variety of media—essays, fiction, memoir, film, and visual arts—at the center of our analysis.  Narrative will be paired with critical readings that will provide historical, social, political, and theoretical context for our discussion. Same as CLEN G6511.

CLEN G6511 Feminism and Disability Studies

Days and times: W 2:10pm-4pm
Instructors: Rachel E. Adams
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Call number: 98097
Points: 4

This course studies the intersection of feminism and disability studies as a critical problem, a theoretical rubric, and a site of cultural production. These fields have much in common, including the fact that both grew out of movements for rights and social justice, take the body as a key area of concern, and are concerned with intersectionality of such terms as gender, ability, race, ethnicity, and class. However, they have not always been in dialogue. In this course, we will consider the evolution and key questions behind each field, where they overlap and disagree, and what might be gained through a productive conjunction of the two. We will study the sometimes competing perspectives of feminism and disability on debates over reproductive choice, dependency and care, and the representation of the non-normative body as we seek strategies for intersection and reconciliation. We will begin by assuming a close connection between aesthetic and social/political representation, putting narratives in a variety of media - essays, fiction, memoir, film, and visual arts -- at the center of our analysis. Narrative will be paired with critical readings that will provide historical, social, political, and theoretical context for our discussion. Same as CLEN W3972.

CLEN G6820 Novel and Feminist/Queer Theory

Days and times: W 4:10pm-6pm
Instructors: Marianne Hirsch
Location: 752 Schermerhorn Ext
Call number: 64687
Points: 4

In the past decades, feminist and queer literary theorists have found in the novel a template ripe for critical reflections on key literary, cultural and theoretical questions. The seminar will revisit a number of feminist and queer classics in literature and theory as well as recent novels that have engendered new theoretical imaginings. We will grapple with debates about the crossings of embodiment, difference, power, colonization, and globalization, as well as the queer and gendered inflections of narrative, performativity, reading, authorship, plot, time, and space. Readings will include works by Charlotte Brontë, Cixous, Cliff, Coetzee, Duras, Flaubert, Freud, Henry James, Kincaid, Larsen, Morrison, Rhys, Winterson, as well as Abel, Butler, Eng, Gilbert and Gubar, Halberstam, Hartman, Irigaray, Kristeva, Love, McClintock, Puar, Sedgwick, Spivak.  Application Instructions: Please email Professor Hirsch (mh2349@columbia.edu) for permission to enroll.

CPLS G6330 Nomadic Posthuman Subjects

Days and times: M W 11-12:55pm (Feb 15th – March 9th)
Location: 407 Mathematics Building
Call number: 63453
Points: 1.5

Instructor: Rosi Braidotti

*MINI-SEMINAR 2/15/16 – 3/9/16*

The course focuses on contemporary formations of critical and feminist issues that start from issues of non-unitary subjectivity and open up to questions related to technological mediation, economic globalization, contemporary security concerns and the cognitive character of advanced capitalism. Questions of "nomadic" mobility are more relevant than ever in the context of advanced capitalism. This means that the role of non-human actors is central to the political economy of critical discourses in the global arena. Global mobility, and the re-definition of human/non-human interaction however, does not automatically resolve power differences and other forms of structural inequality and in many ways even intensifies them. The "posthuman" predicament, far from being post-ideological, calls for an urgent redefinition of political and ethical agency. The course aim at raising critical perspectives to come to terms with the complexity of these conceptual and methodological challenges.

EAAS 4277 Japanese Anime and Beyond: Gender, Power and Transnational Media

Days and times: T 6:10pm-8pm
Instructors: Hikari Hori
Location: TBA
Call number: 11348
Points: 4

This is an upper-level undergraduate and graduate (MA) seminar. It would be helpful if students have some background in film/media studies, cultural studies, and/or East Asian studies, though no prerequisite is required. The guiding questions of the course: The animated films variably have become sites of knowledge formation and aesthetic experiments in different regions of the world. How so? What were the underlying historical and cultural conditions that led to the invention and circulation of animation? What would be a heuristic and effective narrative mode to examine the transnational history of animation? In order to go beyond the narrow confines of area studies that often separate the treatment of Japanese animation from the Euro-American and/or Asian contexts, this course provides a comparative approach. The tripartite course begins by introducing canonical works of Japanese animated film (anime) and provides an overview of the state of field. The next session discusses historically important films (from Europe, US and China) which students examine along with the selected readings from animation theories. The final section explores, in addition to recent animated films, comics and graphic novels (Japan and Korea), which are vital media for understanding animation.

ECON 4480 Gender and Applied Economics

Days and times: Tu Th 1:10pm-2:25pm
Instructors: Lena Edlund
Location: TBA
Call number: 71503
Points: 3

Prerequisites: ECON W3211, W3213. This course studies gender gaps, their extent, determinants and consequences. The focus will be on the allocation of rights in different cultures and over time, why women's rights have typically been more limited and why most societies have traditionally favored males in the allocation of resources.

ENGL 3505 LGBT Literature: Lesbian and Gay Playwrights

Days and times: F 6:10pm-8pm
Instructors: John Robinson-Appels
Location: TBA
Call number: 12231
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (Seminar). Application instructions: E-mail the instructor (jr2168@columbia.edu) with your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

ENGL 3740 Studies in African American Literature: The Novels of Toni Morrison

Days and times: M 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructors: Farah Jasmine Griffin
Location: TBA
Call number: 61966
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission. (Seminar). Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Griffin (fjg8@columbia.edu) with the subject heading, "Toni Morrison seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

ENGL 4622 African American Literature II

Days and times: Tu Th 2:40pm-3:55pm
Instructors: Marcellus Blount
Location: TBA
Call number: 61869
Points: 3

This survey of African American literature focuses on language, history, and culture. What are the contours of African American literary history? How do race, gender, class, and sexuality intersect within the politics of African American culture? What can we expect to learn from these literary works? Why does literature matter to students of social change? This lecture course will attempt to provide answers to these questions, as we begin with Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937) and Richard Wright's Native Son (1940) and end with Melvin Dixon's Love's Instruments (1995) with many stops along the way. We will discuss poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fictional prose. Other authors include Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Malcolm X, Ntozake Shange, Audre Lorde, and Toni Morrison. Click here to view syllabus.

FREN G8116 Queer Love in Medieval France

Days and times: F 2:10pm-4pm
Instructors: Eliza Zingesser
Location: 507 Philosophy Hall
Call number: 92596
Points: 3

What did it mean to be queer in the francophone Middle Ages? Was there such a thing? The term ‘sodomy' was used in the period to describe a wide variety of acts (not all sexual), and the term would seem to foreclose the possibility of female same-sex desire. The questions we will address include the following: In an era in which all non-procreative sex was conceived as sinful, does the opposition between homosexual and heterosexual still hold? How does reproductive discourse underpin medieval conceptions of artistic creation? Was male and female homosexuality conceived symmetrically? Our readings will take us through a broad range of genres-from penance manuals to lyric poetry to romance. Texts include Marie de France's lais, troubadour songs, Alan of Lille's Plaint of Nature, the Roman d'Enéas, Heldris of Cornwall's Le Roman de Silence and selected saints' lives.  

ITAL G4391 Italian Women Writers 1945-1990

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4pm
Instructors: Elizabeth Leake
Location: 501 Hamilton Hall
Call number: 69378
Points: 3

TBA

LCRS G4500 Feminist and Queer Theory: Brazil

Days and times: Tu 2:10pm-4pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 86046
Points: 3

Instructor: Miriam Pilar Grossi

This course will introduce students to Brazilian gender studies and to feminist and queer theories from the perspective of social studies of science. Readings will combine anthropological, historical and political perspectives about women and LGBT people in Brazil. The course includes classical texts as well as some recent works and new directions. This course will introduce students to Brazilian gender studies and to feminist and queer theories from the perspective of social studies of science. Readings will combine anthropological, historical and political perspectives about women and LGBT people in Brazil. The course includes classical texts as well as some recent works and new directions. In order for the course to be useful, we will concentrate on texts published in English by Brazilian authors who work on the theme proposed. The course also aims to provide knowledge and access to Brazilian literature and journals. Students are expected to participate actively in the seminar and to engage in a personal project on a topic of choice - either on a literary track (e.g. one author), theory (one theme) or empirical research (e.g. conducting interviews and analysing data).

PORT G6466 Asia in the Latin American Imaginary

Days and times: Th 1:10pm-3:55pm
Instructors: Ana Paulina Lee
Location: TBA
Call number: 73646
Points: 4

TBA

SOCI 3265 Sociology of Work and Gender

Days and times: Tu Th 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructors: Teresa Sharpe
Location: TBA
Call number: 60704
Points: 3

This course examines gender as a flexible but persistent boundary that continues to organize our work lives and our home lives, as well as the relationship between the two spheres. We will explore the ways in which gender affects how work is structured; the relationship between work and home; the household as a place of paid (and unpaid) labor; and how changes in the global economy affect gender and work identities.

Related courses in other departments

AFRS BC3550 Gay Harlem

Days and times: M 4:10 - 6pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 05119
Points: 4

Instructor: Tyler Schmidt

Prerequisites: This course is limited to 20 students and by permission only. This course explores Harlem's role in the production of sexual modernity and in particular as a space of queer encounter. While much of our investigation will be devoted to the intersection of race and sexuality in African American life, we also consider Harlem's history as a communal space for Italian, Puerto Rican, and more recent immigrants. Students will be encouraged to distinguish and connect contemporary sites of sexual culture in Harlem to the historical articulations of race and sexuality examined in the course.

AFRS BC3562 Caribbean Sexualities

Days and times: W 4:10pm-6:00pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 03972
Points: 4

Instructor: Maja Horn

The seminar offers an interdisciplinary study of sexualities in the Caribbean from the conquest to the contemporary moment. The principal focus will be on how sexualities intersect with questions of gender, race, nation, and diaspora in the Anglophone, Francophone and Spanish-speaking Caribbean. We will approach the study of Caribbean sexualities from various disciplines and areas of study, including history, anthropology, sociology, ethnomusicology, performance studies, literary studies, gender studies, cultural studies, and postcolonial theory. The first part of the seminar addresses Caribbean sexuality in the context of conquest, colonization and slavery, and then national independence. The remainder of the course addresses areas that have drawn particularly intense scholarly debates, including Caribbean family formation, masculinity, and same-sex desire, as well as sex tourism, and the gender and sexual politics of Caribbean popular music and dance.

AHIS 3826 Women Painters in Europe 1500-1750

Days and times: T 4:10-6pm
Location: 832 Schermerhorn Hall
Call number: 83779
Points: 4

Instructor: Michael Cole

Histories of European Renaissance and Baroque art once narrated a story involving almost only male actors: it was men who made the period's paintings and sculptures, men who purchased them, and men who left their views on art for posterity. That characterization of the field is no longer quite so true, and one of the most significant changes in the field is that female painters now feature in every survey of the period. The aim of this course is to look comparatively at the painterly works produced by women across the early modern period and at the way those pictures have been treated in the scholarly literature from the last several decades.

CLCV 3158 Women in Antiquity

Days and times: Tu Th 2:40-3:55pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 08631
Points: 3

Instructor: Helene Foley

Examines the role of women in ancient Greek and Latin literature; the portrayal of women in literature as opposed to their actual social status; male and female in ancient Mediterranean cosmologies; readings from ancient epics, lyric drama, history, historical documents, medical texts, oratory, and philosophy, as well as from contemporary sociological and anthropological works that help to analyze the origins of the Western attitude toward women.

CSER 4360 American Diva: Race, Gender and Performance

Days and times: T 10:10am-12:00pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 19694
Points: 4

Instructor: Deborah Paredez

What makes a diva a diva? How have divas shaped and challenged our ideas about American culture, performance, race, space, and capital during the last century? This seminar explores the central role of the diva—the celebrated, iconic, and supremely skilled female performer—in the fashioning and re-imagining of racial, gendered, sexual, national, temporal, and aesthetic categories in American culture. Students in this course will theorize the cultural function and constitutive aspects of the diva and will analyze particular performances of a range of American divas from the 20th and 21st centuries and their respective roles in (re)defining American popular culture.

EAAS 4226 Gender, Class, and Real Estate in China

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 27996
Points: 4

Instructor: Leta Hong Fincher

This is a seminar for advanced undergraduates and master’s degree students, which explores the socioeconomic consequences of China’s development of a boom, urban residential real-estate market since the privatization of housing at the end of the 1990s. We will use the intersecting lenses of gender/sexuality, class and race/ethnicity to analyze the dramatic new inequalities created in arguably the largest and fastest accumulation of residential-real estate wealth in history. We will examine topics such as how skyrocketing home prices and state-led urbanization have created winners and losers based on gender, sexuality, class, race/ethnicity and location (hukou), as China strives to transform from a predominantly rural population to one that is 60 percent urban by 2020. We explore the vastly divergent effects of urban real-estate development on Chinese citizens, from the most marginaliz4d communities in remote regions of Tibet and Xinjiang to hyper-wealthy investors in Manhattan. Although this course has no formal prerequisites, it assumes some basic knowledge of Chinese history. If you have never taken a course on China before, please ask me for guidance on whether or not this class is suitable for you. The syllabus is preliminary and subject to change based on breaking news events and the needs of the class.

ENGL 3236 Melodrama: Race, Gender, Sexuality, 1850-present

Days and times: M 12:10pm-2:00pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 67497
Points: 4

Instructor: Victoria C Wiet

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (Seminar). This course examines the centrality of melodrama to modern definitions of race, gender, and sexuality by analyzing how the genre's narrative and visual devices encode the historical transformations of these identity categories. The course centers on three tropes: the pathologization of transgressive desire, sexual violence, and interracial violence. We will begin with Gone with the Wind in order to establish a vocabulary for describing melodrama's formal characteristics and then move backward to analyze the codification of the aforementioned tropes on the nineteenth-century stage. We will then examine how postwar Hollywood film uses these tropes in order to translate the dehumanization and restriction experienced by women, queers and African-Americans into feelings of melancholy and resignation which critics argue defer political critique. Our course concludes with the relationship between melodrama and identity politics by studying how post-1968 work responding to sexual assault, LGBT rights and AIDS appropriates melodramatic conventions in order to declare an explicitly political project. Texts include the dramas Camille, Tosca, The Octoroon, and Angels in America; the films Black Narcissus, The Children's Hour, Imitation of Life, and Milk; the course ends with the television serials Mad Men and Orange is the New Black. Students will also be introduced to feminist, queer and critical race scholarship on affect theory and the relation between identity politics and representation. Application instructions: E-mail the instructor (vcw2106@columbia.edu) with your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

ENGL BC3133 Early Modern Women Writers

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 01752
Points: 4

Instructor: Kim Hall

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. PLEASE NOTE: starting the spring 2015 semester, there will NOT be a departmental sign-up sheet for this class. Despite popular conceptions insisting that the ideal Renaissance woman was silent, as well as chaste and obedient, many women in the early modern period (c. 1550-1800) defied such sentiments by writing, circulating and publishing their own literature. Under the influence of humanism, a generation of educated women arose who would become both the audience for and contributors to the great flowering of literature written in sixteenth and seventeenth century England. As we examine how these women addressed questions of love, marriage, age, race and class, we will also consider the roles women and ideas about gender played in the production of English literature. We will read from a range of literary (plays & poetry) and non-literary (cookbooks, broadside, midwifery books) texts. Seminar participants will be asked to circulate a formal paper for peer review and complete two digital projects.

FREN BC3062 Women in French Cinema

Days and times: Tu Th 2:10-3:55pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 09044
Points: 3

Instructor: Anne Boyman

This course traces the evolving nature of the relationship between women and society in French cinema from the New Wave of the 60's to the present. Attitudes of women and towards women will be examined in the light of the changing social, political, and intellectual context.

HIST BC3500 Poverty, Race and Gender in the U.S.

Days and times: M/W 10:10-11:25a
Instructors: Premilla Nadasen
Location: TBA
Call number: 01494
Points: 3

TBA

HIST BC3865 Gender and Power in China

Days and times: Tu Th 2:40-3:55pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 07302
Points: 3

Instructor: Dorothy Ko

This course explores the power dynamics of gender relations in Chinese history and contemporary society. Specifically, we seek to understand how a range of women--rulers, mothers, teachers, workers, prostitutes, and activists--exercised power by utilizing available resources to overcome institutional constraints.

HIST BC4999 Transnational Feminism

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 09372
Points: 4

TBA

HRTS G4400 Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Human Rights

Days and times: Th 4:10-6pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 23299
Points: 3

Instructor: Paisley Currah

Debates over the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people have never been more visible in the international arena. Advocates are beginning to have some success in putting sexual orientation and gender identity on the agenda for inclusion in human rights instruments. But in many local and regional contexts, state-sanctioned homophobia is on the rise, from the official anti-gay stance of Russia featured during the Sochi Winter Games to the passage of Mississippi’s anti-gay bill and Uganda’s anti-homosexuality act. This course examines these trends in relation to strategies pursued by grassroots activists and NGOs and the legal issues they raise, including marriage and family rights, discrimination, violence, torture, sex classification, and asylum. We will also focus on current debates about the relation between sexual rights and gender justice, tensions between universalisty constructions of gay/trans identity and local formations of sexual and gender non-conformity, and legacies of colonialism.   

INAF U6143 Gender, Globalization and Human Rights

Days and times: W 4:10-6pm
Location: 801 International Affairs Building
Call number: 71546
Points: 3

Instructor: Yasmine Ergas

Prerequisites: Students who have not taken either International Human Rights Law or International Law must obtain instructor permission to enroll From the ‘feminization of migration' to labor market effects of trade agreements, from the recognition of rape as a war crime to the emergence of transnational advocacy movements focused on women's and LGBTQ rights, globalization is being shaped by and reshaping gender relations. Human rights norms are directly implicated in these processes. The development of global and regional institutions increases the likelihood that national policies affecting gender relations will be subject to international scrutiny. At the same time, local activists redefine international norms in terms of their own cultural and political frameworks with effects that impact general understandings. What ‘human rights' can women claim, where, how and from whom? What human rights can LGBT people claim? How can we craft effective and fair policies on the basis of the existing human rights framework?

INAF U6369 Gender and Power on the Pacific Rim

Days and times: Tu 11:00am-12:50pm
Location: 501B International Affairs Building
Call number: 86146
Points: 3

Instructor: Sarah C Kovner

This seminar uses the analytical lens of gender to examine society, culture, and politics on the Pacific Rim. Placing equal emphasis on women and femininity, men and masculinity, the course examines a wide array of topics, ranging from the history of immigration and exclusion, to wartime interment, to the comfort women controversy, to contemporary debates about feminism in Asia.

INAF U6371 Globalizing Reproduction

Days and times: T 2:10-4pm
Location: 801 International Affairs Building
Call number: 63441
Points: 1.5

Instructor: Yasmine Ergas

"Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies, and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate." With these words, the new goal on achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls included in the Outcome Document of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in September 2014, commits the international community to recognizing the centrality of care. The new goal further entails commitments to ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health -- also, within nationally set parameters - and ensure women's full and effective participation in political, economic and public life. The realization of these objectives now requires coming to terms with the globalization of reproduction. In recent decades, communication, information and reproductive technologies, changing assumptions regarding the roles of women and men, and the effects of the global economic crisis have converged to generate transnational markets in care and procreation. As people cross borders to provide or purchase goods and services associated with reproduction, new spaces are created for (licit and illicit) entrepreneurs specialized in the movement of workers, body parts, corporeal services (like gestation), and children; specialized labor forces of care workers and baby producers are generated; and resolving conflicts national legal frameworks regulating areas from citizenship and residency to health and family organization once considered the purview of nation states becomes central to the international agenda. How are such markets to be regulated? How can (and should) conflicting national models be reconciled? How, in other words, can the new SDG be translated into state and international practices which do, indeed, promote gender equality and women's empowerment? This course will focus specifically on care and childbearing to explore these questions. **(Mini course) Course Dates: 1/19/16-3/1/16**

INAF U6373 Gender Policy Practicum

Days and times: Tu 2:10-4pm
Location: 801 International Affairs Building
Call number: 13030
Points: 1.5

Instructor: Yasmine Ergas

The Gender Policy Practicum creates a forum in which policy experts from different academic disciplines and fields of practice can share their experiences and perspectives with SIPA students. Through the Practicum, students will explore gender integration in various SIPA concentrations and specializations, as well as in multiple arenas of policy development and implementation. Students will be introduced to current trends and debates related to the promotion of gender equality in different fields of policy practice and will be encouraged to think critically about these issues and their relevance to their academic and professional goals. **(Mini Course) Course Dates: 3/08/06-4/26/16**

INAF U6376 LGBT Rights Internationally

Days and times: Tu 9-10:50am
Location: 501B International Affairs Building
Call number: 69255
Points: 1.5

Instructor: Jessica Stern

On September 24, 2014, a hotly contested resolution passed the UN Human Rights Council condemning discrimination and violence on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.  The protracted fight for the resolution demonstrates how lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights are one of the most controversial issues in international human rights, culture, law and public policy today.  This course will explore how LGBT rights impact mainstream debates, such as bilateral relations and good governance, while also teaching students to understand the particular challenges of fulfilling LGBT rights, such as access to legal recognition for LGBT partnerships and transgender identities.  This course offers students an in-depth discussion about the challenges and opportunities of working on LGBT rights at the international level, surveys debates within the field, and equips students to competently address LGBT rights as they manifest across a range of academic and professional interests. Breaking news and contemporary debates will be integrated into the course work. **(Mini Course) Course Dates: 1/19/16-3/01/16**

INAF U8785 Gender, Politics and Development

Days and times: M 2:10-4pm
Location: 801 International Affairs Building
Call number: 11846
Points: 3

Instructor: Eugenia McGill, Maxine Weisgrau

Gender equality, and women’s and girls’ empowerment, are now widely accepted as development goals in their own right, and essential to inclusive and sustainable development. But despite progress in many areas, gender gaps and discrimination persist. How did gender equality move from the periphery to the center of development discourse, and what difference has this made? Is gender equality a human right, an essential aspect of human development, or “smart economics”? What are the implications of a gender equality agenda for men and boys, and for broader understandings of gender identities and sexualities? What policies, strategies and practices have been effective – or ineffective – in narrowing gender gaps and improving outcomes for both women and men in particular development settings? In this course, we approach gender, politics and development in terms of theory, policy and practice. We apply a critical gender lens to a wide range of development sectors and issue areas, including economic development, political participation, education and health, environment and climate change, and conflict and displacement. We also consider current debates and approaches related to gender mainstreaming and gender metrics in development practice. Students engage with the course material through class discussion, exercises and case studies, and the development of a gender-related project proposal.

MDES G8220 Universalizing Sexuality

Days and times: W 4:10-6pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 60720
Points: 4

Instructor: Joseph A Massad

This doctoral seminar will address how the universalization of sexuality as an essential human (and sometime animal) attribute that transcends cultures began to be studied in U.S. academia in earnest in the 1970s, proceeding apace with the mobilization for sexual rights in U.S. domestic social activism, and by the 1980s with the mobilization of universal human rights as a central agenda for both U.S. foreign policy and international activism. With the era of globalization, these trends intensified with the aggressive proliferation of Western-funded non-governmental organizations in the Global North and South. The seminar will examine the literature on the universalization of sexual rights and identities by U.S. and European activists and scholars and the implication this has for sexual citizenship in the Global North and for sexuality studies itself in the Western Academy. Of particular interest to the seminar will be the resistance attributed by this literature to Islam, Muslims, and Arabs to assimilate into this new regime of universal sexuality, whether located in the Muslim or Arab worlds, or among Muslim populations in Europe and the United States and how the latter’s presence in the heart of the Global North may influence sexual citizenship negatively.

MUSI 2500 Women and Music

Days and times: M W 1:10-2:25pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 68009
Points: 3

Instructor: Alessandra M Ciucci

This course explores the relationship between women, music, and performance from a thematic and a cross-cultural perspective. Through the analysis of different case studies, we will investigate different topics from the perspective of ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, and performance studies. A number of critical questions we will consider include: how does a particular gender ideology constructs and is constructed by musical aesthetics? What are some of the critical roles for women in performance?  What is the significance of gender in performances? What does it mean for women to have have and to be the voice? And how is a musical performance bound up with emotions?

POLS BC3330 Colloquia: Women in American Politics

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 03720
Points: 4

Instructor: Michael Miller

Prerequisites: V 1201 or equivalent A well-functioning democracy should certainly reflect the intent of its citizens, but it is worthwhile to consider whether this goal is achievable when the legislative assembly does not take on the characteristics of the population. In Congress, membership is comprised of fewer than 20% of women. Women constitute a somewhat greater proportion of the various state assemblies, but still not at levels that approach their share of the population. In this class, we will discuss the electoral experiences of women who run for office. We will also consider whether the women who are elected to public office behave differently, and what, if any, implications such a difference might have for public policy. We will also study how gender intersects with race and socio-economics in American political life. This course will introduce students to the concepts, major themes, and debates in the study of gender in American politics. Students who complete the class will learn how to: 1. Identify the key concepts, trends, and debates in the empirical study of women in American politics. 2. Draw linkages between theoretical political science and practical politics in describing how gender affects political outcomes. 3. Critically engage media coverage of women in politics. 4. Assess the theoretical and/or empirical quality of academic arguments about women in politics. 5. Use empirical evidence to present an effective argument, both written and verbal. 6. Produce a high-quality, original research paper that contributes to our understanding of gender in American political life.

PSYC BC3152 Psychological Aspects of Sexuality

Days and times: M 11am-12:50pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 01798
Points: 4

Instructor: Wendy Mckenna

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, BC1001 and two other psychology courses and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students. This seminar is a critical examination of research and theory in human sexuality.  The first part of the course is an overview of influential social science research on sexuality during the 20th century.  The second part is a detailed investigation of contemporary research and writing on selected issues in human sexual behavior, including sexual socialization, gender and sexuality, and contemporary approaches to understanding psychosexual disorders.

RELI 3742 Freud and Derrida

Days and times: MW 2:40-3:55pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 13247
Points: 3

Instructor: Gil Anidjar

From sexual difference to the difference writing makes, psychoanalysis and deconstruction have affected the way we think about reading, writing, learning. Both have become parts of cultural discourse in the form of catch phrases, categories of understanding, and political indictments. Psychoanalysis and deconstruction are also markers of a long conversation in which the meaning of subjectivity, authorship, agency, literature, culture and tradition is spelled out in detailed readings that intervene in and as dialogue and interruption. In this reading intensive class, we will attend to the basic texts and terms of psychoanalysis and deconstruction: the unconscious and sexuality, culture and religion, and more.

SOCI 2400 Comparative Perspectives on Inequality

Days and times: M W 1:10-2:25pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 04204
Points: 3

Instructor: Christel Kesler

Analysis of the contours, causes, and consequences of social inequality in the contemporary United States through systematic cross-national and historical comparisons.  Topics include the distribution of social and economic resources by class, race/ethnicity, and gender and the role of institutions such as families, schools, labor markets, and governments.

SOCI BC3935 Gender and Organizations

Days and times: Th 12:10-2pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 04631
Points: 4

Instructor: Heather M Hurwitz

This course examines the sociological features of organizations through a gender lens. We will analyze how gender, race, class, and sexuality matter for individuals and groups within a variety of organizational contexts. The course is grounded in the sociological literatures on gender and organizations.

WMST 4305 Feminist Postcolonial Theory

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 00295
Points: 4

Women's, Gender, Sexuality Studies @Barnard


Prerequisites: Critical Approaches and/or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Examines important concerns, concepts and methodological approaches of postcolonial theory, with a focus on feminist perspectives on and strategies for the decolonization of Eurocentric knowledge-formations and practices of Western colonialism. Topics for discussion and study include orientalism, colonialism, nationalism and gender, the politics of cultural representations, subjectivity and subalternity, history, religion, and contemporary global relations of domination.

 

WMST BC2140 Critical Approaches in Social and Cultural Theory

Days and times: M W 2:40-3:55p
Location: TBA
Call number: 09334
Points: 3

Instructor: Alex Pittman

 
TBA

WMST BC2150 Practicing Intersectionality

Days and times: Tu Th 10:10-11:25a
Instructors: Rebecca Jordan-Young
Location: TBA
Call number: 02710
Points: 3

This introductory course for the Interdisciplinary Concentration or Minor in Race and Ethnicity (ICORE/MORE) is open to all students. We focus on the critical study of social difference as an interdisciplinary practice, using texts with diverse modes of argumentation and evidence to analyze social differences as fundamentally entangled and co-produced. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this course, Professor Jordan-Young will frequently be joined by other faculty from the Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (CCIS), who bring distinct disciplinary and subject matter expertise. Some keywords for this course include hybridity, diaspora, borderlands, migration, and intersectionality.

WMST BC3509 Gender and Knowledge in Modern European History

Days and times: W 12:10-2p
Location: TBA
Call number: 05173
Points: 4

TBA

WMST BC3512 Art/Work: Sex, Aesthetics, Capitalism

Days and times: Tu 4:10-6pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 07390
Points: 4

TBA

WMST BC3530 Feminist Media Theory

Days and times: W 11a-12:50p
Instructors: Jonathan Lyle Beller
Location: TBA
Call number: 08866
Points: 4

The integration of contemporary media and social practices of all types is intensifying. This seminar examines media theory and various media platforms including Language, Photography, Film, Television, Radio, Digital Video, and Computing as treated by feminists, critical race and queer theorists, and other scholars and artists working from the margins. Attend first class for instructor permission.