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WMST courses

WMST 1001V Intro to Women's and Gender Studies **CORE COURSE**

Days and times: Tues and Thurs 11:40am - 12:55pm
Instructors: Laura Ciolkowski
Location: 304 Barnard Hall
Points: 3

An interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts and analytical categories in women's and gender studies. This course grapples with gender in its complex intersection with other systems of power and inequality, including: sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and nation. Topics include: feminisms, feminist and queer theory, commodity culture, violence, science and technology, visual cultures, work, and family.

WMST 3112V Feminist Theory **CORE COURSE**

Days and times: M 11:00am - 12:50pm
Instructors: Marianne Hirsch
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Extension
Points: 4

Feminist Theory: Vision and Difference

Even before Laura Mulvey’s classic feminist essay on the “male gaze,” feminist artists and filmmakers, as well as theorists of visuality, have analyzed, critiqued and contested the association of vision with power and knowledge. Creatively reframing the gaze and subverting conventions of visual representation, they have reimagined the relationship of media technologies to embodied and social difference, and to social constructions of gender, race, class and sexuality. This course will study these theories and practices by looking at late 20th and early 21st century painting, film, television, photography, comics, performance, activism and social media in transnational perspective. Artists and theorists studied will include the guerilla girls, Ariella Azoulay, Alison Bechdel, Judith Butler, Teresa de Lauretis, Lena Dunham, Judith Halberstam, bell hooks, Jennie Livingston, Laura Mulvey, Shirin Neshat, Griselda Pollock, Marjane Satrapi, Cindy Sherman, Susan Sontag, Jo Spence, Kara Walker, Carrie Mae Weems.

*Enrollment by permission of the instructor, email instructor directly

WMST 3625W Memoir and Embodiment

Days and times: Tues 2:10pm - 4pm
Instructors: Rachel E. Adams
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Extension
Points: 4

Class also listed as a graduate course as G6625

Recent decades have witnessed a flood of life writing about the body, much of it by women and much of it about experiences of illness and disability.  This development represents a significant change, as autobiography has historically been reserved for the most accomplished and able-bodied among us.  Our course will study the rise of what G’ Thomas Couser calls “the some body memoir,” asking how it revises traditional autobiography as it attempts to carve out literary space for voices and bodies that have not historically been represented in public.  We will consider how these new memoirs talk back to doctors and other health care professionals who medicalize the disabled body, as well as social environments that stigmatize and exclude the ill and disabled.  We will also ask how race and gender inform stories of illness and disability, as well as investigating differences between physical and mental illness and/or disability.   Each week we will read one memoir, paired with other writings meant to prompt discuss and critical examination.  In addition to more traditional academic writing, students will also have opportunities to experiment with their own life writing.

WMST 3915W Gender & Power in Transnational Perspective **CORE COURSE**

Days and times: M 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Instructors: Lila Abu-Lughod
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Extension
Points: 4

How have development and globalization impacted (and attempted to impact) gender and sexuality around the world? How do gender and sexuality circulate across national, political, and technological borders in the contemporary era of neoliberal globalization? How has feminism itself become part of these increasingly complex cultural circulations, to women's benefit as well as detriment? In addition to linking together what Chandra Mohanty has described as the "One Third" and "Two Thirds" worlds, this discussionbased seminar seeks to reconnect the disparately gendered intimate and global spheres, situating the feminized "private" domains of love, sex, and caring within fields of action such as geopolitics and global political economy. How do formations of gender and sexuality shift when intimate relations are transnationalized? Does the globalization of intimacy exacerbate inequalities of gender, race, class, and nation, or might it also and simultaneously create unexpected opportunities to alleviate these? Under what circumstances does feminism itself get intertwined in circuits of gendered power? In the first part of this class, we will carefully examine issues of gender, sexuality, and development. In the latter, we turn increasingly toward issues of emotion and transnational intimate exchange and emotional labor while situating these encounters within the economic context we discussed in the first section. 

WMST 4000G Genealogies of Feminism: Bodies, Carnalities (Section 2)

Days and times: Tues 4:10pm - 6pm
Instructors: Elizabeth A. Povinelli
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Extension
Points: 4

This course examines several genealogies of contemporary critical theory in which the body and processes of embodiment are seen as exemplary sites for the production of truth and power. The purpose of the course is to understand how these authors, and these genealogies of thought, variously links bodies to power?power over life and death, power to cripple and rot certain worlds while over-investing others with wealth and hope. We will also attempt to understand how the theoretical landscapes explored and projected in these texts might relate to practical political and sociological struggles in the contemporary world.

WMST 4000G Genealogies of Feminism: Slavery, Coloniality and the Human

Days and times: Tues 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Location: CCIS Conference room at Barnard Hall
Points: 4

This seminar examines the constituent modes of power and violence that make and entangle, respectively define and bind together, slavery, coloniality, and the human. We will consider the meaning of these terms in regard to the forms of social life they organize and institute, the character of dispossession, discipline, bondage and subjection they implement, and the ideals they enable and foreclose. What kind of institution is slavery and how is the plantation to be conceived alongside the colony, the prison, and the death camp? Is the slave an unpaid laborer, a captive, a commodity, a subject abandoned by the law, a dishonored person or disposable life? How do we understand coloniality as both lived and unlivable, forced and impeded, life, as a condition of and alongside enslavement? How are such modes of existence constructed as exceptions to and curtailments or negations of the stipulated condition of being human? And how do we consider the afterlife of the nexus of slavery, coloniality, and the human in the aftermath of formal abolition and decolonization, the expansion of democracy and free labor capitalism, the extension of humanity and the fashioning of universal citizen-subjects?

How do we think about the continuities and discontinuities between slave, colonial and capitalist modes of production? Is the distinction between slavery and freedom less absolute than the terms dictated by liberal fictions of property, selfhood, and rights?  How are we to grapple with the forms of unfreedom that define social life and genres of being human rather than being its exception? The course addresses the problem of slavery, coloniality and the human at the intersection of literary, historical, philosophical and analytic accounts of the institution.  

WMST 6001 Theoretical Paradigms in Feminist Scholarship: Sex Work and Trafficking

Days and times: Mon 2:10pm - 4pm
Instructors: Carole Vance
Location: 406 Hamilton

This seminar examines contemporary issues of sex work and trafficking into forced prostitution, with emphasis on implications for human rights and health. The class explores the use of ethnographic and social research methods in producing complex and culturally grounded descriptions of diverse combinations of work, sexuality, migration, and exploitation, globally and in the US. The seminar also considers the relationship between social research and the development of policy and interventions. Historical background, gender theory, and current legal frameworks are also examined.


*Enrollment by permission of the instructor, email instructor directly csv1@columbia.edu

WMST 6506 Gender Justice

Days and times: MW 1:10pm - 2:40pm
Instructors: Katherine M. Franke
Points: 3

This course will provide an introduction to the concrete legal contexts in which issues of gender and justice have been articulated, disputed and hesitatingly, if not provisionally, resolved. Readings will cover issues such as Workplace Equality, Sexual Harassment, Sex Role Stereotyping, Work/Family Conflict, Marriage and Alternatives to Marriage, Compulsory Masculinity, Parenting, Domestic Violence, Reproduction and Pregnancy, Rape, Sex Work & Trafficking. Through these readings we will explore the multiple ways in which the law has contended with sexual difference, gender-based stereotypes, and the meaning of equality in domestic, transnational and international contexts. So too, we will discuss how feminist theorists have thought about sex, gender and sexuality in understanding and critiquing our legal system and its norms.

WMST 3312V Theorizing Activism

Days and times: Th 2:10-4:00
Points: 3

Professor: Christia Mercer

The goal of this course is to participate in and analyze forms of activism. Students will select and work with a New York- or campus-based organization. Campus-based organizations might include the Center for Justice, No Red Tape, Mobilizing Our Voices Everywhere (M.O.V.E), or Columbia Queer Alliance; New York-based organizations might include New York Civil Liberties Union, Correctional Association of New York, or Make the Road. These are just a few examples of the many organizations to choose among.

The course is limited to those students who can prove interest in activism. To apply, each student should send a paragraph to Professor Christia Mercer (cm50), explaining why s/he wants to take the course and what sort of activism s/he intends to do. Preference will be given to students who have taken at least one course on gender, race, or sexuality. Send applications as soon as possible.

WMST G8001 Feminist Pedagogy

Days and times: January 30, February 13, February 27, March 27 ONLY
Instructors: Ellie M. Hisama
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Extension
Points: 1

This is a course for graduate students who are thinking about issues in teaching in the near and distant future and want to explore issues of pedagogy. The course will ask what it means to teach “as a feminist,” as well as to create a classroom receptive to issues of feminist method and theory regardless of course theme/content.  It will discuss issues of feminist pedagogy including the role of political engagement, the gender dynamics of the classroom, and modes of critical thought and disagreement  Discussions can be oriented around student interest. 

This is a one-credit course, so the demands are light. Do the readings and the assignments and come to class prepared to discuss them.  For a final 5 week duration of the class, you will be working on a syllabus for a course of your choosing. We will discuss these syllabi during the last class session.

Crosslisted courses

ANTH V1200 ANTH V1200 Anthropology of Sexuality

Days and times: MW 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructors: Carole Vance
Location: TBA
Points: 3

This course offers a broad overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic dimensions of sexuality. It focuses on the rapid transformations that are taking place globally in the early 21st century, and on the impact that these transformations have had on sexuality. The relationships between men, women and children are changing quickly, as are traditional family structures and gender norms. What were once viewed as private matters have become public, and an array of new social movements (transgender, intersex, sex worker, people living with HIV) have come into the open. Sexuality has become a focus for public debate and political action in important new ways that will be examined in detail in this course.

CLEN G6550 Mobilizing Memory: Arts and Politics

Days and times: W 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructors: Marianne Hirsch
Location: TBA
Points: 4

This course explores the politics of cultural memory in the aftermath of the atrocities of the 20th and 21st centuries. Theories of memory, trauma, performance and activism emerging from work on the Holocaust, the dictatorships and neo-liberal violence in Latin America and the post 9/11 U.S. will inform our comparative analysis of photography, multi-media art works, testimony projects and performances; trials and truth commissions; as well as museums, memorials, and street actions. We will ask what role the arts play in combating the erasure of past violence from current memory and in creating new political visions and new histories for future generations.  And we will look particularly at the role of gender and social difference on the workings of power and resistance. At the same time, we will probe the limits of comparative, multi-directional and connective approaches to memory politics.

ENGL W3505 Post-AIDS Literature

Days and times: F 6:10pm-8:00pm
Instructors: John Robinson-Appels
Location: TBA
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission (Seminar). Seminal twentieth-century works are analyzed in terms of the formation of a modernist gay literary style, with references to the earlier history of homosexual literature.  Close reading of authors from Europe and the United States, such as Mann, Proust, Baldwin, Cather, Anzaldua, Ashbery, Cavafy, Stein, Cixous, Pasolini, and Lorde.  Discussion of lesbian and gay visual and performing artists in order to clarify literary themes of veiling, amplification, gesture, camp, and the body.  The course will include lesbian and gay theory, in particular Foucault, Barthes, Butler, Sedgwick, Irigaray. The course also considers the newer, post-AIDS literary forms that congeal the most recent cultural knowledge of the continuing AIDS crisis.  How do recent literary forms describe and define:  1.) the medicalization of AIDS, 2.) melancholy and mourning as a response, 3.) literatures of self-healing, 4.) the expressive portrayal of AIDS bodies, 5.) notions of individual vs. social immunity, 6.) the recent social history of immunology, 7.) the scarcity of socio-cultural critique of AIDS etiology, and 8.) the intermittent coverage of "living with AIDS" stories. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Robinson-Appels (jr2168@columbia.edu) with the subject heading, "Gay and Lesbian Literature seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.

FREN G4290 Renegade Sexualities and the Writing of the Self

Days and times: T 6:10pm-8:00pm
Location: TBA
Points: 3

Professor: Elisabeth Ladenson

 

Over the course of the 20th century French literature became increasingly preoccupied with interrogations of gender roles and “deviant” forms of sexuality, often taking the form of first-person narrative. We will read narrative and theoretical works by Colette, André Gide, Simone de Beauvoir, Jean Genet, Violette Leduc, Monique Wittig, and Virginie Despentes, concentrating on depictions of female sexual agency, homosexuality, and prostitution, among other topics. Discussion will be in English; texts may be read in French or in English.

POLS W3626 Gender and International Relations

Days and times: TR 4:10pm-5:25pm
Instructors: Eric Michael Blanchard
Location: TBA
Points: 3

This course is designed as a comprehensive introduction to a way of analyzing and researching global politics and international relations that takes gender seriously as a category of analysis. The course is particularly concerned with the ways in which gender is implicated in the construction of international relations, how this impacts the foreign policies of states, and what this means for the actions of other actors in world politics, such as non- governmental organizations (NGOs), international organizations (IOs), and social movements.

RELI W4120 Gender in Ancient Christianity

Days and times: M 2:10pm-4:00pm
Location: TBA
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission. The function of gender in the construction of religious identity across Christianity's formative centuries. Close attention is paid to the alternative views of male and female writers and to the alternative models of the holy life proposed to male and female Christians.

SOCI 3265 Sociology of Work and Gender

Days and times: TR 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructors: Teresa Sharpe
Location: TBA
Points: 3

This course examines gender as a flexible but persistent boundary that continues to organize our work lives and our home lives, as well as the relationship between the two spheres. We will explore the ways in which gender affects how work is structured; the relationship between work and home; the household as a place of paid (and unpaid) labor; and how changes in the global economy affect gender and work identities.

SOCI W3264 The Changing American Family

Days and times: MW 4:10-5:25pm
Instructors: Angela Aidala
Location: TBA
Points: 3

Worries and debates about the family are in the news daily. But how in fact is "the family" changing? And why? This course will study the family from a sociological perspective with primary emphasis on continuity and change and variation across different historical eras. We'll examine how the diversity of family life and constellations of intimacy and care are shaped by gender roles and expectations, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and sexuality. Discussion Section Required.

Related courses in other departments

AFEN 3146X Resisting Stereotyping 

Instructor: Yvette Christianse
Days and Time: R 11:00am - 12:50pm 
Location: TBA
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will never hurt..." Well. Hmm. This course focuses on theories of stereotypy and its mechanisms. We engage visual images (cinematographic, photographic and painterly) and print culture (novels, poems) that traffic in stereotypes and we consider resistances to these. We read comparatively across African American, African diasporic and African works. We do so by considering the arenas in which stereotyping practices and resistances to do battle: the public sphere and the private, the national and transnational/global. Our readings consider the psychic, political and economic violences of stereotypy as race, gender, sexuality, class, religion and nationality are invoked and manipulated. 

HIST 3865X Gender and Power in China  

Instructor: Dorothy Ko
Days and Time: TR 2:40pm-3:55pm  
Location: TBA
Points: 4

This course explores the power dynamics of gender relations in Chinese history and contemporary society. Specifically, we seek to understand how a range of women--rulers, mothers, teachers, workers, prostitutes, and activists--exercised power by utilizing available resources to overcome institutional constraints.

 

ENGL 3133X Early Modern Woman Writers 

Instructor: Kim F. Hall
Days and Time: W 11:00am-12:50pm 
Location: TBA
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. (Seminar). This seminar examines the many ways in which London was put into print by early modern writers including dramatists, chorographers, poets and historians. We will look at how various genres and textual forms offered different possibilities for interpreting urban life, and at the way changing demographic, spatial and economic practices made themselves felt in literary representations. Among the questions we will ask are the following: What do we think we know about early modern London in terms of the built environment, demographics, political and economic structures? How do literary texts contribute to knowledge about early modern London? How do they represent and divide urban space? How do they suggest urbanization changed notions of status, gender, and sexuality in the early modern city? How do they represent conflict (religious, political, economic) within urban life amd register the ills of city living: pollution, debt, overcrowding, disease, disruption of communal and family structures? To what extent do they represent utopian dimensions of the urban space? 

 

 

AFAS G4080 Topics in the Black Experience, Intellectual History of Black Women  

Instructor: Farah Griffin 
Days and Time: T 2:10-4:00pm  
Location: TBA
Points: 4

TOWARD AN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF BLACK WOMEN: This course will explore the lives and works of several twentieth century Black women intellectuals including, but not limited to Isa B. Wells, Zora Neale Hurston, Eslanda Goode Robeson, and Toni Morrison. We will also read secondary works that seek to construct an intellectual history of Black women. These will introduce us to the cross-disciplinary methodologies scholars use to investigate our subjects' contribution to Black thought.

 

ENGL W3505 LGBT Literature: Gay/Lesbian Marriage 

Instructor: Jonathan Robinson-Appels
Days and Time: F 6:10pm-8:00pm  
Location: TBA
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Instructor's permission (Seminar). Seminal twentieth-century works are analyzed in terms of the formation of a modernist gay literary style, with references to the earlier history of homosexual literature.  Close reading of authors from Europe and the United States, such as Mann, Proust, Baldwin, Cather, Anzaldua, Ashbery, Cavafy, Stein, Cixous, Pasolini, and Lorde.  Discussion of lesbian and gay visual and performing artists in order to clarify literary themes of veiling, amplification, gesture, camp, and the body.  The course will include lesbian and gay theory, in particular Foucault, Barthes, Butler, Sedgwick, Irigaray. The course also considers the newer, post-AIDS literary forms that congeal the most recent cultural knowledge of the continuing AIDS crisis.  How do recent literary forms describe and define:  1.) the medicalization of AIDS, 2.) melancholy and mourning as a response, 3.) literatures of self-healing, 4.) the expressive portrayal of AIDS bodies, 5.) notions of individual vs. social immunity, 6.) the recent social history of immunology, 7.) the scarcity of socio-cultural critique of AIDS etiology, and 8.) the intermittent coverage of "living with AIDS" stories. Application Instructions: E-mail Professor Robinson-Appels (jr2168@columbia.edu) with the subject heading, "Gay and Lesbian Literature seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course.

 

SPAN W3300 Advanced Language Through Content, Gay Culture in Spain  

Instructor: Javier Perez-Zapatero
Days and Time: TR 1:10pm-2:25pm  
Location: TBA
Points: 3

Prerequisites: Completion of the language requirement. "L" course; enrollment limited to 15 students. IMPORTANT: This course replaces the former W3200 and BC3004. If you have taken those courses, do not enroll for W3300. Although section topics vary, you may only take 3300 ONCE. Content-based advanced study of selected aspects of grammar and vocabulary, aimed at increasing proficiency in speaking, listening comprehension, and reading comprehension, with a special emphasis on writing. Topic varies according to instructor. Sections and topics taught at the Department of Spanish and Latin American Cultures include: Hispanic Cultures in the Age of Globalization; Translating Cultures - Advanced Spanish for Native Speakers; Cultura - An Online Cross-Cultural Dialogue; Reading and Interpreting Narrative; Theatre & Society in Contemporary Spain; Short Stories in Latin America; and Immigration and U. S. Educational Policies.

 

AFRS BC 3589y Black Feminisms

AFRS BC 3589y Black Feminisms
 
Instructor: Celia Naylor
Days and times: TBA
Location: TBA
Points: 4
 
What is Black feminism? What is womanism? How do we define Black feminist and womanist thought and praxis? In what ways do Black feminists and womanists challenge European-American/Western feminist constructions and African-American nationalist ideologies? In this course we will utilize Patricia Hill Collins' seminal work, Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender and the New Racism, as the core theoretical framework for our exploration and analysis of key dimensions of contemporary U.S. popular culture. We will specifically address how the work of African-American artists/scholars/activists critiques sexism, racism, classism, heterosexism and ethnocentrism within the U.S. context. In addition, we will analyze how Black feminists/womanists frame and interrogate the politics of race, gender, socioeconomic status, and sexuality in the United States during the contemporary era. In order to examine Black feminism(s) and womanism(s) in popular culture from myriad perspectives, the required readings for this course reflect a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, as well as a range of genres (e.g., essay, visual art, documentary, film, music video, and song). For this course, students will write 2 (5-7-page) essays and 1 (12-15-page) research paper. In addition to the written assignments and class participation, groups of students will co-lead selected class discussions. Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor.
 

 

ANTH V3465 Women and Gender Politics in the Muslim World

ANTH V3465 Women and Gender Politics in the Muslim World
 
Instructor: Nadia Guessous 
Days and times: TR 2:40pm-3:55pm
Location: TBA
Points: 3
 
Practices like veiling that are central to Western images of women and Islam are also contested issues throughout the Muslim world. Examines debates about Islam and gender and explores the interplay of cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping women's lives in the Muslim world, from the Middle East to Southeast Asia.
 

CLC W4110y Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece

CLC W4110y Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece
 
Instructor: Helene Foley
Days and times: TR 2:40pm-3:55pm 
Location: TBA
Points: 3
 
Examination of the ways in which gender and sexuality are constructed in ancient Greek society and represented in literature and art, with attention to scientific theory, ritual practice, and philosophical speculation. Topics include conceptions of the body, erotic and homoerotic literature and practice, legal constraints, pornography, rape, and prostitution. Prerequisites: sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. 
 

ECON BC2010 The Economics of Gender

ECON BC2010 The Economics of Gender 
 
Instructor: Homa Zarghamee
Days and times: TR 1:10pm-2:25pm 
Location: TBA
Points: 3
 
Examination of gender differences in the U.S. and other advanced industrial economies. Topics include the division of labor between home and market, the relationship between labor force participation and family structure, the gender earnings gap, occupational segregation, discrimination, and historical, racial, and ethnic group comparisons.
 

ENGL Reading the Modern Body 1660-1800

ENGL Reading the Modern Body 1660-1800
 
Instructor: Michael Paulson
Days and times: R 2:10pm-4:00pm
Location: TBA
Points: 4
 
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission (Seminar). From yoga studios to TV medical dramas to Internet pornography, our culture is obsessed with the body-its pleasures and pains, its functions and dysfunctions, its desires and limitations. This obsession can be traced back to the historical period of the Enlightenment: as the human displaced the divine as the measure of all things, the physical body took on an unprecedented importance in Western literature, philosophy, and culture more broadly. Focusing on British literature of the late seventeenth and eighteenth century, this seminar will consider how Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment authors reimagined the nature, purpose, and limits of the human body in an increasingly secular age. Central topics will include: gender and sexuality, libertinism, race and nationality, empiricism, materialism, commodity culture, liberalism, sentimentality and sensibility, the relationship between body and mind/self, and the role of the body in political revolution. Authors include Rochester, Behn, Haywood, Swift, Pope, Montagu, Hume, Smith, Richardson, Sterne, Walpole, Burke, Paine, Wollstonecraft, Blake, and William and Dorothy Wordsworth; we will place these authors in dialogue with major historians and theorists of the body including Foucault, Laqueur, Butler, Stallybrass and White, and Castle. Application instructions: E-mail Instructor Paulson (msp94@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Reading the Modern Body seminar". In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.
 

ENGL W3805 Medieval Women’s Texts: Medieval Women Adventurers

ENGL W3805 Medieval Women’s Texts: Medieval Women Adventurers 
 
Instructor: Emma O’Loughlin
Days and times: W 10:10am-12:00pm
Location: TBA
Points: 4
 
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission (Seminar). Application Instructions: E-mail Instructor O'Loughlin (ebo2105@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Medieval Women Adventures seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.
 

Harlem Seminar: Gay Harlem

AFRS BC 3550y Harlem Seminar: Gay Harlem
 
Instructor: Tyler Schmidt
Days and Times: M 4:10pm-6:00pm
Location: TBA
Points: 4
 
This course explores Harlem's role in the production of sexual modernity and in particular as a space of queer encounter. While much of our investigation will be devoted to the intersection of race and sexuality in African American life, we also consider Harlem's history as a communal space for Italian, Puerto Rican, and more recent immigrants. Students will be encouraged to distinguish and connect contemporary sites of sexual culture in Harlem to the historical articulations of race and sexuality examined in the course.
Prerequisites: This course is limited to 20 students. 
 

 

HIST BC4861 Body Histories: Footbinding

HIST BC4861 Body Histories: Footbinding
 
Instructor: Dorothy Ko
Days and times: T 4:10pm-6:00pm
Location: TBA
Points: 4
 
Using the binding of women’s feet as a window, this seminar explores the intricacies of Chinese culture, history, and gender politics. We seek to understand footbinding from multiple perspectives and in different frames: modern feminist critique, Chinese nationalist discourse, premodern Chinese family politics, women’s material culture, and technologies of bodily modification.
 

PSYC BC3152 Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality

PSYC BC3152 Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality 
 
Instructor: Wendy McKenna
Days and times: M 11:00am-12:50pm
Location: TBA
Points: 4
 
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, BC1001 and two other psychology courses and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students. This seminar is a critical examination of research and theory in human sexuality.  The first part of the course is an overview of influential social science research on sexuality during the 20th century.  The second part is a detailed investigation of contemporary research and writing on selected issues in human sexual behavior, including sexual socialization, gender and sexuality, and contemporary approaches to understanding psychosexual disorders.
 

SIPA U6143 Gender, Globalization and Human Rights

SIPA U6143 Gender, Globalization and Human Rights
 
Instructor: Yasmine Ergas
Days and times: R 2:10pm-4:00pm
Location: TBA
Points: 3
 
From the ‘feminization of migration' to labor market effects of trade agreements, from the recognition of rape as a war crime to the emergence of transnational advocacy movements focused on women's and LGBTQ rights, globalization is being shaped by and reshaping gender relations. Human rights norms are directly implicated in these processes. The development of global and regional institutions increases the likelihood that national policies affecting gender relations will be subject to international scrutiny. At the same time, local activists redefine international norms in terms of their own cultural and political frameworks with effects that impact general understandings. What ‘human rights' can women claim, where, how and from whom? What human rights can LGBT people claim? How can we craft effective and fair policies on the basis of the existing human rights framework?  
Prerequisites: Students who have not taken either International Human Rights Law or International Law must obtain instructor permission to enroll.
 

SIPA U6371 Globalizing Reproduction

SIPA U6371 Globalizing Reproduction 
 
Instructor: Yasmine Ergas
Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm
Location: TBA
Points: 1.5
 
"Recognize and value unpaid care and domestic work through the provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies, and the promotion of shared responsibility within the household and the family as nationally appropriate." With these words, the new goal on achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls included in the Outcome Document of the Open Working Group on Sustainable Development adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in September 2014, commits the international community to recognizing the centrality of care. The new goal further entails commitments to ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health -- also, within nationally set parameters - and ensure women's full and effective participation in political, economic and public life. The realization of these objectives now requires coming to terms with the globalization of reproduction. In recent decades, communication, information and reproductive technologies, changing assumptions regarding the roles of women and men, and the effects of the global economic crisis have converged to generate transnational markets in care and procreation. As people cross borders to provide or purchase goods and services associated with reproduction, new spaces are created for (licit and illicit) entrepreneurs specialized in the movement of workers, body parts, corporeal services (like gestation), and children; specialized labor forces of care workers and baby producers are generated; and resolving conflicts national legal frameworks regulating areas from citizenship and residency to health and family organization once considered the purview of nation states becomes central to the international agenda. How are such markets to be regulated? How can (and should) conflicting national models be reconciled? How, in other words, can the new SDG be translated into state and international practices which do, indeed, promote gender equality and women's empowerment? This course will focus specifically on care and childbearing to explore these questions. Spring 2015 Course Dates: January 20-March 3
 

SOCI BC3253 Sociology of Reproduction

SOCI BC3253 Sociology of Reproduction 
 
Instructor: Julia Suh
Days and times: TR 11:40am-12:55pm
Location: TBA
Points: 3
 
This course explores reproduction as a form of social control over women in global context. We review social, technological, political and economic aspects of fertility, pregnancy, birth and parenthood. We investigate how states regulate reproduction and how such policies are embodied and resisted according to class, race and nationality.
 

Unheard Voices: African Women's Literature

Instructors: Yvette Christianse
AFRS BC 3134y Unheard Voices: African Women's Literature
 
Instructor: Yvette Christianse
Days and Times: Tu 11:00am-12:50pm
Location: TBA
Points: 4
 
How does one talk of women in Africa without thinking of Africa as a 'mythic unity'? We will consider the political, racial, social and other contexts in which African women write and are written about in the context of their located lives in Africa and in the African Diaspora. 
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 14 students. 
 

 

WMST W4302 Second Wave Feminism and Jewish Women’s Artistic Responses: 1939-1990

WMST W4302 Second Wave Feminism and Jewish Women’s Artistic Responses:  1939-1990
 
Instructor: Irene Klepfisz
Days and times: M 4:10-6:00pm
Location: TBA
Points: TBA 
 
The course analyzes the responses to Second Wave Feminism through the literary and visual arts of Jewish women artists.  It includes works that foreshadowed feminist consciousness (fiction by Jo Sinclair and Tillie Olsen); Jewish male visions of Jewish women (Philip Roth and Neil Simon); Jewish artistic visions rooted in the Second Wave (Erica Jong and Judy Chicago); adaptation of second wave principles to Jewish identity and religious practice (Roshell Goldstein, Francine Zuckerman, Nessa Rappoport and Leslea Newman); and writers and visual artists who consciously incorporated the diverse visions of these principles into their work  and, in so doing, provided new perspectives of Jewish women's lives and experiences (Rebecca Goldstein,  Lynn Sharon Schwartz, Helene Aylon, Marcia Freedman, E. M. Broner,  Elana Dykewomon and Kate Simon). 
Films:  The Heart Break Kid, Half the Kingdom
Field Trip:  The Dinner Party (Brooklyn Museum)