WGSS In Praxis

Jack Halberstam

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Jack Halberstam is Professor of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and English at Columbia University. Jack is a popular speaker and gives lectures around the country and internationally every year. Lecture topics include: queer failure, sex and media, subcultures, visual culture, gender variance, popular film, animation. Halberstam is currently working on several projects including a book titled WILD THING on queer anarchy, performance and protest culture, the visual representation of anarchy and the intersections between animality, the human and the environment. Halberstam is also finishing up a short book titled Trans* for UC Press, forthcoming in 2017.

Katherine Franke

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Katherine Franke is the Sulzbacher Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, where she also directs the Center for Gender and Sexuality Law and is the faculty director of the Public Rights/Private Conscience Project. She is a member of the Executive Committee for the Institute for Research on Women, Gender and Sexuality, a member of the Steering Committee for the Center for the Study of Social Difference, and an Affiliated Faculty member for the Center for Palestine Studies.  She is among the nation’s leading scholars writing on law, religion and rights, drawing from feminist, queer, and critical race theory.

Jennifer Hirsch

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Jennifer Hirsch’s principal areas of expertise are gender, sexuality, and reproductive health, U.S.-Mexico migration and migrant health, the comparative anthropology of love, and the applications of anthropological theory and methods to public health research and programs. Along with Dr. Claude Ann Mellins, Hirsch currently co-directs the Sexual Health Initiative to Foster Transformation (SHIFT), a study supported by the Office of the President that examines sexual health and sexual assault among Columbia and Barnard undergraduates.

Shamus Khan

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Shamus Khan’s work is primarily within the areas of cultural sociology and stratification, with a strong focus on elites. In addition to his primary focus, Khan also writes in the areas of gender theory, deliberative politics, and research methodology. He is currently the co-PI (with Jennifer Hirsch) of the qualitative portion of SHIFT, a large scale research project on sexual assault and sexual health among Columbia University undergraduates.

Gil Hochberg

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Gil Hochberg is Ransford Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature, and Middle East Studies at Columbia University. Her research focuses on the intersections among psychoanalysis, postcolonial theory, nationalism, gender and sexuality. She has published essays on a wide range of issues including: Francophone North African literature, Palestinian literature, the modern Levant, gender and nationalism, cultural memory and immigration, memory and gender, Hebrew Literature, Israeli and Palestinian Cinema, Mediterraneanism, Trauma and Narrative.

Camille Robcis

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Camille Robcis specializes in modern European intellectual history, with a focus on nineteenth- and twentieth-century France. Her interests have circled around three issues: the historical construction of norms, the intellectual production of knowledge, and the articulation of universalism and difference in modern French history. Prior to coming to Columbia, she taught at Cornell for ten years.

Tey Meadow

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Tey Meadow is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Studies of Women, Gender and Sexuality. Her scholarship spans the domains of law, politics, the family, sexuality and gender, with a specific focus on the creation and maintenance of social classifications. Her first book, Raising the Transgender Child: Being Male or Female in the Twenty First Century, is an ethnographic and interview-based study of the first generation of families affirming and facilitating gender nonconformity in children.