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Past Courses

Spring 2019

WMST Courses

WMST UN1001 Intro to Women’s and Gender Studies

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40am-12:55pm

Call number: 00410

Points: 3

Instructor: Rebecca M Young

Description:  An interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts and analytical categories in women’s and gender studies. This course grapples with gender in its complex intersection with other systems of power and inequality, including: sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and nation. Topics include: feminisms, feminist and queer theory, commodity culture, violence, science and technology, visual cultures, work, and family.


WMST BC3138 Affect and Activism

Days and times: M 2:10 – 4pm

Call number: 00409

Points: 3

Instructor: Neferti Tadiar

Description:  TBA


WMST UN3311 Feminist Theory

Days and times: Th 12:10pm – 2pm

Call number: 00411

Points: 4

Instructor: Alexander Pittman

Description: An exploration of the relationship between new feminist theory and feminist practice, both within the academy and in the realm of political organizing. Prerequisites: LIMITED TO 20 BY INSTRUC PERM; ATTEND FIRST CLASS


WMST BC3512 Art/Work: Sex, Aesthetics, and Capitalism

Days and times: Tu 12:10pm-4pm

Call number: 07390

Points: 4

Instructor: Alexander Pittman

Description: How can performances, theatrical texts, and other art/media objects illuminate the operations of gender, sexuality, and race in global capitalism? Drawing from a range of artistic media and critical traditions, we explore how aesthetic thought can help us analyze the sexual, racial, and national character of contemporary labor and life.


WMST UN3522 Senior Seminar II

Days and times: M 6:10pm – 8pm

Call number: 77743

Points: 4

Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod

Description: Individual research in Women’s Studies conducted in consultation with the instructor. The result of each research project is submitted in the form of the senior essay and presented to the seminar.


WMST UN3915 Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective 

Days and times: Th 10:10am – 12pm

Call number: 60899

Points: 4

Instructor: Selina Makana

Description: Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally, as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work and trafficking, feminist politics, and human rights. , If it is a small world after all, how do forces of globalization shape and redefine both men’s and women’s positions as as workers and political subjects? And, if power swirls everywhere, how are transnational power dynamics reinscribed in gendered bodies? How is the body represented in discussions of the political economy of globalization? These questions will frame this course by highlighting how gender and power coalesce to impact the lives of individuals in various spaces including workplaces, the home, religious institutions, refugee camps, the government, and civil society, and human rights organizations. We will use specific sociological and anthropological case studies, to look at how various regimes of power operate to constrain individuals as well as give them new spaces for agency.This course will enable us to think transnationally, historically, and dynamically, using gender as a lens through which to critique relations of power and the ways that power informs our everyday lives and identities. Prerequisites: Instructor approval required


WMST GU4275 Medea Goes to Court

Days and times: M 10:10am – 12pm

Call number: 

Points: 4

Instructor: Patrica Dailey and Lisa Dwan

Description: Medea has, like many of her Greek counterparts, proven a pivotal figure for sharply contrasting interpretations of her roles as woman, mother, wife, deity, immigrant, and murderer. This course explores facets of Medea the character and Medea the play in light of today’s politics and with the aim of understanding the extent of Euripides’ feminism in its ancient Greek context. How are we to judge Medea, the character and Medea the play? What do we make of the question of justice, of a woman’s honor and her claim to reason well in a culture of misogyny, both then and now? Might Medea herself go to court in our times? This course pursues these and many other questions in a seminar jointly taught by Patricia Dailey and Lisa Dwan. This seminar has the dual purpose of engaging in depth with the stage and literary traditions of Medea while preparing the terrain for the writing of a new Medea by Lisa Dwan and Margaret Atwood. With this in mind, students will be readings relevant selections by Atwood (poetry, fiction, essays) to better understand Atwood’s feminism and astute portrayals of the complexity of gender in contemporary culture.


WMST GU4300 Advanced Topics: Queer Theory

Days and times: W 2:10pm – 4pm

Call number: 12581

Points: 4

Instructor: Jack Halberstam

Description: TBA


WMST BC4303 Gender, Globalization, and Empire

Days and times: W 2:10pm – 4pm

Call number: 03299

Points: 4

Instructor: Neferti Tadiar

Description: Study of the role of gender in economic structures and social processes comprising globalization and in political practices of contemporary U.S. empire. This seminar focuses on the ways in which transformations in global political and economic structures over the last few decades including recent political developments in the U.S. have been shaped by gender, race, sexuality, religion and social movements. Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 20 students.


WMST W4311 Feminism and Science Studies

Days and times: W 10:10am – 12pm

Call number: 00412

Points: 4

Instructor: Rebecca M Young

Description: Investigates socially and historically informed critiques of theoretical methods and practices of the sciences. It asks if/how feminist theoretical and political concerns make a critical contribution to science studies. Prerequisites: Feminist Theory or permission of instructor.


WMST GU4506 Gender Justice

Days and times: M 2:10pm-4pm

Call number: 23048

Points: 3

Instructor: Katherine Franke

Description: This course will provide an introduction to the concrete legal contexts in which issues of gender and justice have been articulated, disputed and hesitatingly, if not provisionally, resolved. Readings will cover issues such as Workplace Equality, Sexual Harassment, Sex Role Stereotyping, Work/Family Conflict, Marriage and Alternatives to Marriage, Compulsory Masculinity, Parenting, Domestic Violence, Reproduction and Pregnancy, Rape, Sex Work & Trafficking. Through these readings we will explore the multiple ways in which the law has contended with sexual difference, gender-based stereotypes, and the meaning of equality in domestic, transnational and international contexts. So too, we will discuss how feminist theorists have thought about sex, gender and sexuality in understanding and critiquing our legal system and its norms.


WMST GR6001 Theoretical Paradigms: Reframing Gender Violence Globally

Days and times: M 4:10 – 6:10pm

Call number: 28143

Points: 3

Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod

Description: Over the past couple of decades, violence against women (VAW) and gender-based violence (GBV) have come to prominence as loci for activism throughout the world. Both VAW and GBV regularly garner international media attention and occupy a growing place in international law and global governance. Since 2000 alone there have been more than 25 UN protocols, instruments and conventions directed at its eradication or mitigation.  By embedding gendered violence in a complex matrix international norms, legal sanctions, and humanitarian aid, the anti-VAW movement has been able to achieve a powerful international “common sense” for defining, measuring, and attending to violence against women in developing countries, particularly during conflict and post-conflict situations. When invoked in the halls of the United Nations and used to shape international policy, the terms violence against women (VAW) and gender-based violence (GBV) are often assumed to have stable meanings; yet they do not.  What do different parties mean when they talk of violence against women or of gender-based violence?  What is left out when the problem is framed in particular ways, and whose interests are served by such framings?  Religion, culture, and ethnicity are often linked to gendered violence with entire groups pathologized. Women in conflict situations are abstracted from their local contexts while the conflicts themselves are insistently localized. The definition of VAW or GBV is narrowed to attacks on bodily integrity, with economic, political and structural forms of violence increasingly excluded from the frames.

This course will explore transnational feminist debates about gender-based violence and examine the critical concepts being developed within the scholarly literature to question this “common sense.” What are the elisions and exclusions in many common-sense understandings of these terms? Can we deepen the ways in which we engage with the manifestations and causes of such violence?  We will proceed through close readings of the texts of the key feminist thinkers, researchers, and activists who are contributing to the critical analysis of the dynamics and history of this international agenda. We pay special attention to place-based research on the applicability and deployment of particular approaches to gender-based violence as found in human rights work, humanitarianism, philanthrocapitalism, and the proliferating organizations, governmental and nongovernmental, around the world that promote girls’ and women’s rights and freedom from violence. Case studies will focus mostly on the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa.


WMST GR8001 Feminist Pedagogy

Days and times: Tu 6:10-8:10pm

Call number: 23212

Points: 1

Instructor: Marianne Hirsch

Description: This is a course is oriented to graduate students who are thinking about issues in teaching in the near and distant future and want to explore forms of pedagogy. The course will ask what it means to teach “as a feminist” and will explore how to create a classroom receptive to feminist and queer methodologies and theories regardless of course theme/content. Topics include: participatory pedagogy, the role of political engagement, the gender dynamics of the classroom, modes of critical thought and disagreement. Discussions will be oriented around student interest. The course will meet 4-5 times per SEMESTER (dates TBD) and the final assignment is to develop and workshop a syllabus for a new gender/sexuality course in your field.  Because this course is required for graduate students choosing to fulfill Option 2 for the Graduate Certificate in Feminist Studies at IRWGS, priority will be given to graduate students completing the certificate.

Crosslisted Courses

FILM W4940 Queer Cinema

Call number: 62548

Points: 3

Instructor: Ronald Gregg

Description: This course examines themes and changes in the (self-)representation of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender people in cinema from the early sound period to the present.   It pays attention to both the formal qualities of film and filmmakers’ use of cinematic strategies (mise-en-scene, editing, etc.) designed to elicit certain responses in viewers and to the distinctive possibilities and constraints of the classical Hollywood studio system, independent film, avant-garde cinema, and world cinema; the impact of various regimes of formal and informal censorship; the role of queer men and women as screenwriters, directors, actors, and designers; and the competing visions of gay, progay, and antigay filmmakers.  Along with considering the formal properties of film and the historical forces that shaped it, the course explores what cultural analysts can learn from film. How can we treat film as evidence in historical analysis? We will consider the films we see as evidence that may shed new light on historical problems and periodization, and will also use the films to engage with recent queer theoretical work on queer subjectivity, affect, and culture.


HIST GU4801 Gender and Women in Islam: South Asia

Call number: 84030

Points: 4

Instructor: Tahira S Khan

Description: This course will examine various roles that a religion can play in shaping its believers’ socio-political and religious identities on the basis of their natural/social differences i.e. sex and gender. Further, an attempt will be made to search for historical explanations through the lens of class, rural/urban economies and geo-ethnic diversities which have shaped gender relations and women’s status in various Muslim countries. The main focus of the course will be on Islam and its role in the articulation of gendered identities, the construction of their socio-religious images, and historical explanation of their roles, rights and status in the regions of South Asia and Middle East since 1900. The central argument of the course is that, for historical understanding of a set of beliefs and practices regarding gender relations and women’s status in any religious group, one needs to examine the historical context and socio-economic basis of that particular religion. By using the notion of gender and historical feminist discourses as tools of analysis, this course intends to understand and explain existing perceptions, misperceptions, myths and realities regarding gender relations and Muslim women’s situations in the distant and immediate past. This course begins with a historical materialist explanation of the religion of Islam and examines men & women’s roles, rights and responsibilities as described in the religious texts, interpretations, traditions and historical sources such as the Quran, Hadith, Sunnah and Sharia.  It will further attempt to study these issues by situating them in histories of local and regional diversities (i.e. South Asia, Middle East). A historical perspective will facilitate students’ understanding of male and female Muslim scholars’ ventures to re/read and re/explain the Islamic texts in modern contexts of South Asia and the Middle East.


HIST GU3017 Sexuality and the City 

Call number: 95942

Points: 4

Instructor: George Chauncey

Description:The city has classically been represented as the site of sexual freedom, but also of sexual immorality and danger.  This course explores the interrelated histories of sexuality and the city in the twentieth-century United States (especially New York) by exploring how urban conditions and processes shaped sexual practices, identities, communities, and ethics, and how sexual matters shaped urban processes, politics, and representation.


SOC UN3265 Sociology of Work & Gender 

Call number: 77414

Points: 3

Instructor: Teresa Sharpe

Description: This course examines gender as a flexible but persistent boundary that continues to organize our work lives and our home lives, as well as the relationship between the two spheres. We will explore the ways in which gender affects how work is structured; the relationship between work and home; the household as a place of paid (and unpaid) labor; and how changes in the global economy affect gender and work identities.


SOC GU4029 Sociology of Sexualities

Call number: 20245

Points: 4

Instructor: Tey Meadow

Description: TBA

 

Related Courses

AFRS BC3110 The Africana Colloquium: Caribbean Women

Call Number: 05430

Points: 4

Instructor: Celia E. Naylor

Description: Prerequisites: Students must attend first day of class and admission will be decided then. Enrollment limited to 18 students. Priority will be given to Africana majors and CCIS students (Africana Studies, American Studies and Women’s Studies majors; minors in Race and Ethnic Studies).


AMST UN3931 Section 5 – Equity in Higher Education 

Call Number: 2391

Points: 4

Instructor: Andrew Delbanco and  Roger Lehecka

Description: In this seminar we examine the roles colleges and universities play in American society; the differential access high school students have to college based on family background and income, ethnicity, and other characteristics; the causes and consequences of this differential access; and some attempts to make access more equitable. Readings and class meetings cover the following subjects historically and in the 21st century: the variety of American institutions of higher education; admission and financial aid policies at selective and less selective, private and public, colleges; affirmative action and race-conscious admissions; what “merit” means in college admissions; and the role of the high school in helping students attend college. Students in the seminar are required to spend at least four hours each week as volunteers at the Double Discovery Center (DDC) in addition to completing assigned reading, participating in seminar discussions, and completing written assignments. DDC is an on-campus program that helps New York City high school students who lack many of the resources needed to succeed in college and to be successful in gaining admission and finding financial aid. The seminar integrates students’ first-hand experiences with readings and class discussions. Email Professor Lehecka (rl9) to arrange interview. Priority to those applying by Nov. 1. 


AMST UN3931 Section 3 – American Legal History: The Rule of Law 

Call Number: 73460

Points: 4

Instructor: Michael Hindus

Description: The rule of law is the underpinning of our economy (through the enforcement of contracts and the protection of property) and defines and protects our rights.  This seminar will explore some of the most important ways in which law and the legal system transformed American society. We will look at the legal status of slaves and of freed people after emancipation, the status of women, both married and single, and how the concept of privacy became enshrined in law.  We will also look at how law transformed the economy in the 19th century and conversely how the explosive growth of the American economy disrupted and transformed American law. Other topics will include how Native Americans had their land taken away (with a guest lecturer who is an expert on Native American law) and the history of crime and punishment, leading to mass incarceration.  Readings will include secondary works as well as primary sources and legal cases. No preregistration, join waitlist and attend first class.


ANTH UN3728 Ethnographies of Black Life 

Call Number: 23458

Points: 4

Instructor: Vanessa L Agard-Jones

Description: This course explores themes that have shaped Anthropology’s (often fraught) engagement with Black life. We will critically examine texts that reveal the ways that the discipline and its practitioners have sought to interface with people and populations of African descent—and have sought to define the constitution of Blackness itself—in the Americas. Plumbing the dynamic relationship between historical and ethnographic inquiry, we will ask pressing questions not only about conditions of Black life (and Black death), but also about the production of knowledge about the people who live under Blackness’ sign. Finally, we will turn our collective attention to key issues in the practice, ethics, and politics of ethnography, while also immersing ourselves in the archives produced through ethnographic and auto-ethnographic practice, including those found in various NYC collections.


AHIS GR8487 Seeing Women’s Work in the art of Native Americans 

Call Number: 62698

Points: 4

Instructor: Elizabeth Hutchinson

Description: This seminar is organized around the study of pottery, baskets, weavings and other tailored textiles on display in the exhibition “Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection,” and is a collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This landmark long-term display is the first to present Indigenous North American art in the Museum’s American Wing and the display invites the close analysis of more than 100 objects, over half of which were created by women. Unlike in other areas, Native women’s artistic accomplishments have long been recognized. Yet there is more to be said about the significance of the expert design and craftspersonship of Indigenous women’s art. Meeting weekly in the galleries and joined several times during the semester by an Indigenous artist, curator, or scholar, we will investigate how to see and understand women’s work in the sourcing and preparation of materials, in the conceptualization of design and decoration, in the crafting of finished pieces, and in their use. Discussion will center on a single object, with related pieces brought in to deepen our investigation. Readings will range from texts that focus on individual artistic traditions to those which explore gender in relationship to Indigenous culture and history. Each student will offer two presentations to the class: the first will focus on one of the works on display and the second will pair an object from “Art of Native America” with a related work created by a living Indigenous woman artist.


CLEN UN3223 Medical Fictions, Romantic to Modern  

Call Number: 68696

Points: 4

Instructor: Arden A Hegele

DescriptionLiterature and medicine have always been in dialogue: Apollo was the god of physicians and poetry, while some of the greatest writers, such as John Keats and Anton Chekhov, were trained as doctors. In our time, literature and medicine have become ever more entwined in Susan Sontag’s formulation of “illness as metaphor,” and in the emergent fields of “medical humanities” and “narrative medicine” that bridge the practices of writer and doctor. This course, which is open to students in both medicine and literature, aims to introduce students to how literary fiction—from the 19th century to the present day—reveals the historical interplay between physicians and writers. We examine how medical professionalism is portrayed in literature, how writers and doctors negotiate the clinical encounter, and how narrative shapes the physician’s practice. As we move through shifting paradigms in both medical and literary history, we explore how thematic, generic, and ethical concerns transcend the divisions between the disciplines: new fields like epidemiology, pathology, and psychiatry influenced the familiar form of the novel, while the case history and gothic fiction display unexpected commonalities. We consider, too, how problems of gender and sexuality recur across medical fictions, and how medical ways of knowing lend themselves to great artistic movements. As we read, we will strive to answer a broader question: why is medicine so often represented through tropes of the supernatural? Writers include Edgar Allan Poe, Charlotte Brontë, Anton Chekhov, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sylvia Plath, and Kazuo Ishiguro, as well as critical readings by Virginia Woolf, Sigmund Freud, Oliver Sacks, Michel Foucault, and Donna Haraway. The class will also attend a reading of a new play, Krista Knight’s Lipstick Lobotomy. Both literature and medical (or pre-med) students are invited to apply; medical students may take this course for R-credit or as a substitute for their Narrative Medicine requirement. This seminar will particularly suit students who are interested in British literature, literature post-1800, prose fiction, social justice, and the medical humanities.  To apply, write to the course instructor with a brief statement of interest.


CLGM GU4150 C.P. Cavafy and the Poetics of Desire 

Call Number: 13773

Points: 4

Instructor: Nikolas Kakkoufa

Description: This course takes C. P. Cavafy’s oeuvre as a departure point in order to discuss desire and the ways it is tied with a variety of topics. We will employ a number of methodological tools to examine key topics in Cavafy’s work such as eros, power, history, and gender. How can we define desire and how is desire staged, thematized, or transmitted through poetry? How does a gay poet write about desired bodies at the beginning of the previous century? What is Cavafy’s contribution to the formation of gay identities in the twentieth century? How do we understand the poet’s desire for an archive? How important is the city for activating desire? How do we trace a poet’s afterlife and how does the desire poetry transmits to readers transform through time? How does literature of the past address present concerns? These are some of the questions that we will examine during this course. 


CLSC GU4320 Marginalization in Medicine 

Call Number: 14837

Points: 4

Instructor: Samuel K Jr Roberts

Description: There is a significant correlation between race and health in the United States.  People of color and those from underserved populations have higher mortality rates and a greater burden of chronic disease than their white counterparts.  Differences in health outcomes have been attributed to biological factors as race has been naturalized.  In this class we will explore the history of the idea of “race” in the context of changing biomedical knowledge formations.  We will then focus on the impact that social determinants like poverty, structural violence, racism and geography have on health.  Ultimately, this course will address the social implications of race on health both within the classroom and beyond. In addition to the seminar, there will also be a significant service component. Students will be expected to volunteer at a community organization for a minimum of 3 hours a week. This volunteer work will open an avenue for students to go beyond the walls of their classrooms while learning from and positively impacting their community.


CSER UN3219 Native Food Sovereignty  

Call Number: 81759

Points: 4

Instructor: Hiilei J Hobart

DescriptionWhat is food sovereignty? How do you decolonize your diet? This course takes a comparative approach to understanding how and why food is a central component of contemporary sovereignty discourse. More than just a question of eating, Indigenous foodways offer important critiques of, and interventions to, the settler state: food connects environment, community, public health, colonial histories, and economics. Students will theorize these connections by reading key works from across the fields of Critical Indigenous Studies, Food Studies, Philosophy, History, and Anthropology. In doing so, we will question the potentials, and the limits, of enacting, food sovereignty within the settler state, whether dietary decolonization is possible in the so-called age of the Anthropocene, and the limits of working within and against today’s legacies of the colonial food system.


EAAS UN3207 Lights, Camera, Action: The Visual Culture of K-POP

Call Number: 22048

Points: 4

Instructor: So-Rim Lee

DescriptionIn this course, we will explore the total political economy of culture that is K-pop, simultaneously a State-sponsored industry, an agency-generated cultural product, and a fandom-distributed community. In the recent years, scholars in various sectors have been actively demystifying the many social performances entailing K-pop through the frames of globalization and transnationalism. To see K-pop as transnationalism in performance is to construe it not as unidirectional or monolithic, but as a constant interpellation between national export and transnational transaction, each utterance refracted a mile a minute by its “glocal (global and local)” performers through social and web-based media. Paying particular attention to how such identities are negotiated within the portmanteau “K-pop,” we will engage with the critical frames of Korean studies, performance studies, and media & visual culture to explore its major topics and defining moments in rigorously discussion-based seminars.


ENGL UN3225 Virginia Woolf

Call Number: 61565

Points: 4

Instructor: Edward Mendelson

Description(Lecture). Six novels and some non-fictional prose: Jacob’s Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, Orlando, The Waves, Between the Acts; A Room of One’s Own, Three Guineas.  Applications on paper only (not e-mail) in Professor Mendelson’s mailbox in 602 Philosophy, with your name, e-mail address, class (2017, 2018, etc.), a brief list of relevant courses that you’ve taken, and one sentence suggesting why you want to take the course.


ENGL GU4622 African American Literature II 

Call Number: 23582

Points: 3

Instructor: Farah Griffin

Description(Lecture). This survey of African American literature focuses on language, history, and culture. What are the contours of African American literary history? How do race, gender, class, and sexuality intersect within the politics of African American culture? What can we expect to learn from these literary works? Why does our literature matter to student of social change? This lecture course will attempt to provide answers to these questions, as we begin with Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937) and Richard Wright’s Native Son (1940) and end with Melvin Dixon’s Love’s Instruments (1995) with many stops along the way. We will discuss poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fictional prose. Ohter authors include Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Malcom X, Ntzozake Shange, Audre Lorde, and Toni Morrison. There are no prerequisites for this course. The formal assignments are two five-page essays and a final examination. Class participation will be graded.


ENGL UN3895 Fantasy in Medieval Romance 

Call Number: 77496

Points: 4

Instructor: Jenna A Shoen

DescriptionWhat kinds of fantastic creatures and supernatural wonders fill the medieval imagination? What do these strange marvels say about medieval desires, fears, and beliefs? This course examines the supernatural in medieval romance, the most popular genre of the middle ages. Throughout the semester, we will investigate a wide-range of romances from early Breton lais to modern film adaptations, and we will identify the primary conventions and concerns that define the genre, such as waste lands, witches, demons, chivalry, identity, and sexual desire. We will pay particularly close attention to how fantasy works in these romances, considering what about the genre makes it particularly receptive to magic and what kinds of magical motifs recur throughout romance. We will contemplate how the supernatural works in these romances to articulate other pressing medieval concerns, such as religion, science, gender, politics, and culture. Most of our texts will be in the original Middle English, and you will achieve a proficient reading level of the language by the end of the course.


ENGL UN3287 Hauntings: American Poetry in the 1980s  

Call Number: 14269

Points: 4

Instructor: Tiana A Reid

DescriptionThis seminar explores the relationship between history and poetry. Focusing on the 1980s, also known as the Reagan era, we will privilege poetic production as a vantage point to think about this tumultuous period in the U.S. What is the relationship between this historical conception of the Reagan era and the poetic sensibility fostered in and against those social political conditions? By focusing on reading poetry books published in the 1980s, we will think through post-NY school, language, eco-, improvisational, confessional, avant-garde, feminist, visual, and performance poetry. What the political stakes of formal poetic concerns?


ENGL UN3851 Indian Writing in English 

Call Number: 70206

Points: 4

Instructor: Gauri Viswanathan

DescriptionAs the great imperial powers of Britain, France, and Belgium, among others, ceded self-rule to the colonies they once controlled, formerly colonized subjects engaged in passionate discussion about the shape of their new nations not only in essays and pamphlets but also in fiction, poetry, and theatre. Despite the common goal of independence, the heated debates showed that the postcolonial future was still up for grabs, as the boundary lines between and within nations were once again redrawn. Even such cherished notions as nationalism were disputed, and thinkers like the Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore sounded the alarm about the pitfalls of narrow ethnocentric thinking. Their call for a philosophy of internationalism went against the grain of ethnic and racial particularism, which had begun to take on the character of national myth. The conflict of perspectives showed how deep were the divisions among the various groups vying to define the goals of the postcolonial nation, even as they all sought common cause in liberation from colonial rule.

Nowhere was this truer than in India. The land that the British rulers viewed as a test case for the implementation of new social philosophies took it upon itself to probe their implications for the future citizenry of a free, democratic republic. We will read works by Indian writers responding to decolonization and, later, globalization as an invitation to rethink the shape of their societies. Beginning as a movement against imperial control, anti-colonialism also generated new discussions about gender relations, secularism and religious difference, the place of minorities in the nation, the effects of partition on national identity, among other issues. With the help of literary works and historical accounts, this course will explore the challenges of imagining a post-imperial society in a globalized era without reproducing the structures and subjectivities of the colonial state. Writers on the syllabus include Rabindranath Tagore, M.K. Gandhi, B.R. Ambedkar, Mulk Raj Anand, Raja Rao, Mahasweta Devi, Bapsi Sidwa, Rohinton Mistry, Amitav Ghosh, and Arundhati Roy.


FILM UN1000 Introduction to Film and Media Studies 

Call Number: 27519

Points: 3

Instructor: Jane Gaines

DescriptionPrerequisites: Discussion section FILM UN1001 is a required corequisite. This course serves as an introduction to the study of film and related visual media, examining fundamental issues of aesthetics (mise-en-scene, editing, sound), history (interaction of industrial, economic, and technological factors), theory (spectatorship, realism, and indexicality), and criticism (auteurist, feminist, and genre-based approaches). The course also investigates how digital media change has been productive of new frameworks for moving image culture in the present. FILM UN1001 is required discussion section for this course.


HIST GU4713 Orientalism and the Historiography of the Other 

Call Number: 14969

Points: 4

Instructor: Rashid I Khalidi   

DescriptionThis course will examine some of the problems inherent in Western historical writing on non-European cultures, as well as broad questions of what it means to write history across cultures. The course will touch on the relationship between knowledge and power, given that much of the knowledge we will be considering was produced at a time of the expansion of Western power over the rest of the world. By comparing some of the “others” which European historians constructed in the different non-western societies they depicted, and the ways other societies dealt with alterity and self, we may be able to derive a better sense of how the Western sense of self was constructed. Group(s): C Field(s): ME


HRTS GU4880 Human Rights in the United States  

Call Number: 75307

Points: 3

Instructor: Lara J Nettelfield    

DescriptionThe United States sees itself as a country founded on the norms of equality under the law and inalienable rights but the modern reality is quite different. Police brutality in Ferguson, Executive Orders banning Muslims, protests at the Dakota Pipeline, the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, high levels of domestic violence, wage stagnation, and the lack of a right to health care, all point to a human rights crisis at home. Some scholars have even argued that, for the majority of its citizens, the United States has the standards of a “third world” country. In which areas are the most violations of human rights occurring and why? How have long term trends, including historical legacies, contributed to the current state of affairs? This survey course will provide an overview of contemporary human rights issues in the United States and will analyze them through the theoretical lenses of scholarship in the fields of comparative politics (including social movements) and law and society. It will outline the different actors in the human rights landscape, and focus on the various forms and strategies of mobilization around human rights issues with an eye to what has helped increase the enjoyment of rights.


RELI UN3521 Muslim Masculinities

Call Number: 88947

Points: 4

Instructor: Derek Mancini-Lander   

Description This interdisciplinary course explores a variety of Muslim modes of masculinity as they have developed over time and as they have varied across different regions of the Islamic World. Students examine and problematize the social and cultural construction of masculinity in various parts of the Islamic world, including in the Middle East, South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, and in the Muslim diasporas of Europe and the Americas. In trying to understand the complex ways in which men and manhood are made in Islamic societies we will center our attention on the perceptions of bodily and social differences in Muslims’ larger articulations of gender and sexuality. A particular focus will be on the relationship between masculinity and violence against women and non-Muslims.


RUSS GU4453 Women and Resistance in Russia

Call Number: 29530

Points: 3

Instructor: Valentina Izmirlieva    

DescriptionCultural and political history of women and resistance in Russia, from the Putin era to medieval saints. Explores forms and specificity of female resistance in Russia across history. Addresses questions of historical narrative in light of missing sources. Material includes: prose by Svetlana Alexievich, Lydia Chukovskaya, Lidiya Ginzburg, Alexandra Kollontai, Masha Gessen, Anna Politkovskaia, and Pussy Riot’s Nadezhda Tolokonnikova; poetry by Anna Akhmatova, Marina Tsvetaeva and Sophia Parnok; films by Kira Muratova; visual art by Natalia Goncharova and fellow “amazons” of the Russia Avant Garde, together with memoirs, saint’s lives, letters, diaries, and urban legend. Final project: curating a museum exhibit. Prerequisites: Open to undergraduate and graduate students. No Russian required for the undergraduate students. Graduate students are expected to do the readings in Russian.


ACLS X3450 Women and Leadership 

Call Number: 04851

Points: 4

Instructor: Sylvie R Honig     

DescriptionPrerequisites: Permission of instructor. Limited to 15. Examination of the social conditions and linguistic practices that have shaped the historical and contemporary gendering of leadership, power, and authority in the United States and around the world. Through examples drawn from the social, political, and economic worlds, we will explore leadership in varying racial, class, and regional contexts.


CLCV GU4110 Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece  

Call Number: 00354

Points: 3

Instructor: Helene P. Foley

DescriptionPrerequisites: sophomore standing or the instructor’s permission. Examination of the ways in which gender and sexuality are constructed in ancient Greek society and represented in literature and art, with attention to scientific theory, ritual practice, and philosophical speculation. Topics include conceptions of the body, erotic and homoerotic literature and practice, legal constraints, pornography, rape, and prostitution.


ECHS X2590 Measuring History: Empirical Approaches to Economic and Social History

Call Number: 08899

Points: 4

Instructor: Alan Dye 

DescriptionThis course examines big themes in economic and social history-population history and human well-being, inequality and poverty, and gender differences. Using these themes, it adopts a hands-on data-driven approach to introduce tools and concepts of empirical reasoning. Datasets related to each theme create opportunities for learning by doing.


EDUC X3042 Gender, Sexuality, and Schooling 

Call Number: 01186

Points: 4

Instructor: Rachel Throop 

DescriptionBroadly, this course explores the relationship between gender, sexuality, and schooling across national contexts. We begin by considering theoretical perspectives, exploring the ways in which gender and sexuality have been studied and understood in the interdisciplinary field of education. Next, we consider the ways in which the subjective experience of gender and sexuality in schools is often overlooked or inadequately theorized. Exploring the ways that race, class, citizenship, religion and other categories of identity intersect with gender and sexuality, we give primacy to the contention that subjectivity is historically complex, and does not adhere to the analytically distinct identity categories we might try to impose on it.


ENGL BC3100 Creative Nonfiction: The Queer Story 

Call Number: 0000

Points: 4

Instructor: Jennifer Boylan 

Description: Stories created and edited in this creative nonfiction workshop will focus on the lives and experiences of LGBTQ people. Written work may include essays, memoir, reportage, and other nonfiction. This work will be augmented by lectures, trainings, and reading about media representation of queer lives. 


ENTH BC3145 Early American Drama and Performance: Staging a Nation

Call Number: 01214

Points: 4

Instructor: Pamela Cobrin

Description: Competing constructions of American identity in the United States date back to the early republic when a newly emerging nation struggled with the questions: What makes an American American? What makes America America? From colonial times forward, the stage has served as a forum to air differing beliefs as well as medium to construct new beliefs about Nation, self and other. The texts we will read, from colonial times through WWI, explore diverse topics such as politics, Native American rights, slavery, labor unrest, gender roles, and a growing immigrant population.


FRENCH BC3102 Paris is a Woman: Women of the Left Bank 

Call Number: 01218

Points: 3

Instructor: Hadley T Suter

Description: This course will group together the women who shaped and epitomized Left Bank culture in Paris from the Belle Époque to the mid-twentieth century; it will also situate these women in relation to their male peers whose works went on to establish the canons of Symbolism, Dadaism, Surrealism, and Existentialism. We will focus primarily on the realms of literature, philosophy, and art, but we will also examine how some of these women advanced cultural production more broadly—by starting publishing presses, opening bookshops, holding salons, etc. Readings will be primarily in French (Colette, Anna de Noailles, Renée Vivien, Simone de Beauvoir; Breton, Valéry, Aragon, Sartre) but will also include some English-language authors (Gertrude Stein, Djuna Barnes, Anaïs Nin). All discussions, coursework, and examinations will be in French.


POLS BC3254 First Amendment Values

Call Number: 01940

Points: 3

Instructor: Paula A Franzese

Description: Examines the first amendment rights of speech, press, religion and assembly. In-depth analysis of landmark Supreme Court rulings provides the basis for exploring theoretical antecedents as well as contemporary applications of such doctrines as freedom of association, libel, symbolic speech, obscenity, hate speech, political speech, commercial speech, freedom of the press and religion. (Cross-listed by the American Studies Program.) 


POLS BC3445 Colloquium on Gender and Public Policy

Call Number: 05526

Points: 4

Instructor: Katherine L. Krimmel

Description: In this course, we will examine how notions of sex and gender have shaped public policies, and how public policies have affected the social, economic, and political citizenship of men and women in the United States over time.

 


PSYC BC3152 Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality

Call Number: 01798

Points: 4

Instructor: Wendy McKenna 

Description: This seminar is a critical examination of research and theory in human sexuality. The first part of the course is an overview of influential social science research on sexuality during the 20th century. The second part is a detailed investigation of contemporary research and writing on selected issues in human sexual behavior, including sexual socialization, gender and sexuality, and contemporary approaches to understanding psychosexual disorders.


RELI GU4525 Religion, Gender, & Violence

Call Number: 00400

Points: 4

Instructor: Janet Jakobsen

Description: Investigates relations among religion, gender, and violence in the world today. Focuses on specific traditions with emphasis on historical change, variation, and differences in geopolitical location within each tradition, as well as among them at given historical moments. 


URBS W3485 Urban Political Economy

Call Number: 01269

Points: 3

Instructor: Christain Seiner

Description: What are the processes driving social change in contemporary cities? How are urban spaces structured in power? This course introduces some of the main concepts, theories, and ideas of contemporary scholarship in urban political economy, with a focus on the history and institutions of New York City. We will approach urban politics and economy from a geographic and historical perspective in order to arrive at some consensus conclusions about how urban spaces and places are made. While New York City will be a primary focus, we will read case studies and history on other cities as well. Throughout the course we will emphasize the structural implications of class, race, and gender.

 


Fall 2018

WMST Courses

WMST BC2140 Critical Approaches in Social and Cultural Theory

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40 am – 12:55 pm

Call number: 02265

Points: 3

Instructor: Alex Pittman

Description: Introduction to key concepts from social theory as they are appropriated in critical studies of gender, race, sexuality, class and nation. We will explore how these concepts are taken up from different perspectives to address particular social problems, and the effects of these appropriations in the world.

 

WMST BC2150 Practicing Intersectionality

Days and times: Tu/Th 1:10 pm – 2:45 pm

Call number: 01326

Points: 3

Instructor: Manijeh Moradian

Description: This introductory course for the Interdisciplinary Concentration or Minor in Race and Ethnicity (ICORE/MORE) is open to all students. We focus on the critical study of social difference as an interdisciplinary practice, using texts with diverse modes of argumentation and evidence to analyze social differences as fundamentally entangled and co-produced. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this course, Professor Jordan-Young will frequently be joined by other faculty from the Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (CCIS), who bring distinct disciplinary and subject matter expertise. Some keywords for this course include hybridity, diaspora, borderlands, migration, and intersectionality.

 

WMST UN3125 Introduction to Sexuality Studies

Days and times: M/W 2:40 pm – 3:55 pm

Call Number: 21138

Instructors: Jack Halberstam

Points: 3

Description: This course is designed to introduce major theories sexuality, desire and identity. We will be considering the relations between the history of sexuality and the politics of gender. We will read some primary texts in gender theory, and in the study of sexuality, desire, and embodiment. This course also provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary examination of human sexual and erotic desires, orientations, and identities. We will study how desires are constructed, how they vary and remain the same in different places and times, and how they interact with other social and cultural phenomena such as government, family, popular culture, scientific inquiry, and, especially, race and class.

 

WMST BC3312 Theorizing Women’s Activism

Days and times: W 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call number: 01401

Points: 4

Instructor: Christina Heatherton

Description: Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or Feminist Theory or permission of instructor. Helps students develop and apply useful theoretical models to feminist organizing on local and international levels.  It involves reading, presentations, and seminar reports.  Students use first-hand knowledge of the practices of specific women’s activist organizations for theoretical work.

 

WMST BC3514 Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions

Days and times:  Th 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 05571

Points: 4

Instructor: Alex Pittman

Description: This course will provide students with a comparative perspective on gender, race, and sexuality by illuminating historically specific and culturally distinct conditions in which these systems of power have operated across time and space. In particular, the course seeks to show how gender has not always been a binary or primary category system.  Such approach is also useful in understanding the workings of race and sexuality as mechanisms of differentiation.  In making these inquiries, the course will pay attention to the intersectional nature of race, gender, and sexuality and to strategic performances of identity by marginalized groups.

 

WMST UN3521 Senior Seminar I

Days and times: Tu 12:10 – 2:10pm

Instructors: Lila Abu-Lughod

Call number: 13284

Points: 4

Description: The Senior Seminar in Women’s Studies offers you the opportunity to develop a capstone research paper by the end of the first semester of your senior year. Senior seminar essays take the form of a 25-page paper based on original research and characterized by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of women, sexuality, and/or gender. You must work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of your thesis and who can advise you on the specifics of method and content. Your grade for the semester with be determined by IRWGS’s Director of Undergraduate Studies in consultation with your advisor. Students receiving a grade of “B+” of higher in Senior Seminar I will be invited to complete Senior Seminar II. Senior Seminar II students will complete a senior thesis of 40-60 pages in a course facilitated by the IRWGS Director.

 

WMST UN3525 Senior Seminar: Knowledge, Practice, Power

Days and times: Tu 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructors: Rebecca M Young

Call number: 08939

Points: 4

Description: Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to senior majors. The Senior Seminar in WGSS offers you the opportunity to develop a capstone research project during the first semester of your senior year. The capstone project may be freestanding, or, with permission of the instructor, may be continued during the spring semester as a Senior Thesis.  The capstone project must be based on original research and involve an interdisciplinary approach to the study of women, sexuality, and/or gender. You must work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of your project and who can advise you on the specifics of method and content. Your grade for the semester with be determined by the Senior Seminar instructor in consultation with your advisor.

 

WMST BC3915 Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective

Days and times: T 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 01330

Points: 4

Instructor: Elizabeth Bernstein

Description: Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or the instructor’s permission.

Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally, as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work and trafficking, feminist politics, and human rights.

If it is a small world after all, how do forces of globalization shape and redefine both men’s and women’s positions as as workers and political subjects? And, if power swirls everywhere, how are transnational power dynamics reinscribed in gendered bodies? How is the body represented in discussions of the political economy of globalization? These questions will frame this course by highlighting how gender and power coalesce to impact the lives of individuals in various spaces including workplaces, the home, religious institutions, refugee camps, the government, and civil society, and human rights organizations. We will use specific sociological and anthropological case studies, to look at how various regimes of power operate to constrain individuals as well as give them new spaces for agency.This course will enable us to think transnationally, historically, and dynamically, using gender as a lens through which to critique relations of power and the ways that power informs our everyday lives and identities.

 

WMST UN3335 Gender and Wars: Perspectives from the Global South

Days and times: W 10:10pm-12:00pm

Call Number: 18109

Points: 4

Instructor: Selina Makana

Description: Wars are salient features of globalization. But, how can we understand the relationship between gender and war? How do notions of masculinities and femininities operate in the organizing, waging, protesting, and commemorating war? Starting from the premise that gender is crucial to explaining what happens in national revolutionary wars, postcolonial conflicts and civil wars, peacekeeping and humanitarian interventions, and the social and personal aspects when wars come to an end; this course considers a transnational feminist analysis to reflect on the relationship between gender and militarism. It pulls together literature from different disciplinary fields to explore the gendered dimensions of wars of national liberation, armed conflicts, wartime gender based/sexual violence, politics of victimhood, anti-war activism, resistance and agency. We will pay particular attention to case studies from the global South. The gendered analyses of war will be explored from a multi-disciplinary framework including history, anthropology, sociology, political science, international relations, philosophy, literature and film. We will utilize film, journalistic accounts, ethnographic narratives and other resources to explore the complex ways in which people, especially men and women experience and respond to wars differently.

 

WMST UN3450 Topics in Sexuality and Gender Law

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call Number: 82596

Points: 3

Instructor: Suzanne Goldberg

Description:

As society shifts in its views about sexuality and gender, so too does the law.  Indeed, legal developments in this area have been among the most dynamic of the past couple of decades.  Yet law does not map easily or perfectly onto lived experience, and legal arguments do not necessarily track the arguments made in public debate.

In this seminar, we will explore the evolving jurisprudence of sexuality and gender law in a variety of areas.  Our goal throughout the semester will be to understand and think about these issues as lawyers do – with our primary focus on understanding and evaluating the arguments that can be made on both (or all) sides of any particular case, with some attention to the factors outside of the courtroom that might shape how courts approach their work.  Related to this, we will also seek to understand how and why some of the jurisprudence has changed over time.

 

WMST GU4000 Genealogies of Feminism: Vision and Difference

Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call Number: 68314

Points: 4

Instructor: Marianne Hirsch

Description: Even before Laura Mulveys classic feminist essay on the “male gaze,” feminist artists and filmmakers, as well as theorists of visuality, have analyzed, critiqued and contested the association of vision with power and knowledge. Creatively reframing the gaze and subverting conventions of visual representation, they have reimagined the relationship of media technologies to embodied and social difference, and to social constructions of gender, race, class and sexuality. This course will study these theories and practices by looking at late 20th and early 21st century painting, film, television, photography, comics, performance, activism and social media in transnational perspective.

 

WMST BC3131 Women & Science

Days and times: T 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call Number: 01327

Points: 4

Instructor: Laura E Kay

Description: History and politics of women’s involvement with science. Women’s contributions to scientific discovery in various fields, accounts by women scientists, engineers, and physicians, issues of science education. Feminist critiques of biological research and of the institution of science.

 

WMST BC 3132 Gendered Controversies

Days and times: W 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call Number: 01328

Points: 4

Instructor: Janet Jakobsen, Rebecca Jordan-Young

Description: Investigates the significance of contemporary and historical issues of social, political, and cultural conflicts centered on women’s bodies. How do such conflicts constitute women, and what do they tell us about societies, cultures, and politics? – D. Ko

 

WMST V3813 Colloquium on Feminist Inquiry

Days and times: W 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call Number: 01334

Points: 4

Instructor: Janet Jakobsen

Description: A survey of research methods from the social sciences and interpretive models from the humanities, inviting students to examine the tension between the production and interpretation of data. Students receive firsthand experience practicing various research methods and interpretive strategies, while considering larger questions about how we know what we know.

 

Crosslisted Courses

ANTH UN3465 Women, Gender Politics in the Muslim World

Days and times: MW 11:40am-12:55pm

Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod

Points: 3

Call Number: 65089

Description: Practices like veiling that are central to Western images of women and Islam are also contested issues throughout the Muslim world. Examines debates about Islam and gender and explores the interplay of cultural, political, and economic factors in shaping women’s lives in the Muslim world, from the Middle East to Southeast Asia.

 

CLEN GU4559 Literature and Intersectional Feminisms

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructors: Denise Cruz

Call number: 

Points: 4

Description: The term “intersectional feminism” has seen renewed currency in the last year or so, but the methodologies and theories of intersectional feminisms have a much longer history. Kimberlé Crenshaw first theorized “intersectional feminism” as a critical framework in the 1990s. Crenshaw’s initial formation, however (as she herself has recognized), was conversant with a longer history of woman-of-color, transnational, and postcolonial feminisms. This seminar focuses on historicizing and examining contemporary literature through an intersectional approach that combines woman-of-color feminisms, transnational and global feminisms, postcolonial studies, queer studies, and disability studies. How do these texts imagine these crossings? What possible complexities, conflicts, or coalitions emerge? Since formal innovation has long been critical to foundational work in gender and sexuality studies scholars and writers, who often weave together art, practice, and politics, we will read theory as literature and literature as theory, and we will closely analyze links between intersectional feminisms and form, aesthetics, and genre.

 

CPLS GU4220 Sexual Science? Writing and the Epistemological Question of Psychoanalysis

Days and times: Th 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructors: Marcus Coelen

Call number: 62196

Points: 4

Description: Mallarmé saw writing as a “mad game” [“ce jeu insensé d’écrire”]. Following Blanchot following Mallarmé, Foucault equaled literature’s writing again with “madness [folie]” and then both with the enigmatic thought of an “absence of work [absence d’œuvre].”

By bringing together close readings and references to clinical experience, this course hopes to show that writing lies at the heart of psychoanalysis. We will also ask what share of the “mad game” is written into this heart, and how it is linked to the epistemological adventure of psychoanalysis. Is it a science that doesn’t work but still keeps writing?

In Freud we will trace a poetics that secretly informs the careful constructions of his concepts and theoretical compositions. With Schreber we will analyze a drive to find a formula for the mad experience, a drive that does not only inform his own Memoirs of my Nervous Illness but whose transference can be read in founding texts of psychoanalytic writing on psychosis. In Lacan we will comment on his intention to force a reduction of psychoanalytic discourse to such an extent that it may yield the letters of a “writing of the real.”

By elaborating these three moments of writing – (poetic) construction, (mad) formalization, (literal) reduction – we will ask what they have to do with the “sexual” – the word, the concept, the thing, and its metonymies (transference, libido, drive, affect, Eros) – with the “sexual”, this other “heart” of psychoanalysis. How does it pulse beat in the psychoanalytic epistemology?

 

HIST GR8938 Gender as Critique

Days and times: T 4:10pm – 6:00pm

Instructors: Camille A Robcis

Call number: 67897

Points: 4

Description: In recent years, conservative and religious activists throughout Europe and Latin America have organized massive street protests against what they are calling “the theory of gender.”  Although rarely defined, this “theory of gender” has been decried as the inspiration for women and LGBT rights and it has come to encapsulate a series of wide-ranging fears and fantasies from individualism, Marxism, hyper-liberalism, to the dissolution of the self.  The goal of this seminar is to explore different scholarly articulations of gender, in order to understand why this concept appears so threatening today. What does it mean to consider gender as a methodrather than an object and how does it shift in relation to sex, class, and race?  How can gender function as a lens for critique?  The course will begin with more “classic” accounts of gender (Beauvoir, Lévi-Strauss, Rubin, Wittig, Butler, Foucault, Scott) before turning to recent critical works across various disciplines (history, anthropology, literature, political theory, history of science, and psychoanalysis).

 

HSWM UN2761 Gender and Sexuality in African History

Days and times: T/TH 10:10am – 11:25 am

Instructors: Rhiannon Stephens

Call number: 23318

Points: 4

Description: 

 

MDES GR5040 Decolonizing Vision

Days and times: M 4:10pm – 6:00pm

Instructors: Gil Hochberg and Gayatri Gopinath

Call number: 60032

Points: 4

Description:  This interdisciplinary seminar explores the ways in which racial, imperial, and settler colonial regimes of power instantiate regimes of vision that determine what we see, how we see, and how we are seen. We will consider how the legitimacy and authority to rule and regulate particular populations has been inextricably linked to the concomitant power to visually survey these populations and the landscapes they inhabit. We explore how colonial modernity’s abiding legacy is the institution of a way of seeing, and hence knowing, that obscures the intimacies of imperial, racial, and settler colonial projects as they produce racial, gendered, and sexual subjectivities. Most importantly, we identify “decolonial visual practices” that speak to these submerged, co-mingled histories, and that point to their continuing resonance in the present.

Note: First class meets at CU, then at NYU on alternate Mondays.

 

MUSI GR8360 Gender/Sexuality/Music Theory/History

Days and times: M 2:10pm – 4:00pm

Instructors: Ellie Hisama

Call number: 23963

Points: 3

Description: This interdisciplinary seminar focuses on feminist and queer theory and current research in gender and sexuality studies in relation to music. Builds upon previous work theorizing music using gender and sexuality as analytical lenses and considers a variety of music to illustrate different strategies and approaches.

 

SOCI UN3323 Race, Gender, Sexuality & Punishment

Days and times: T 10:10am – 12:00pm

Instructors: Joss T. Greene

Call number: 68442

Points: 4

Description: This 4-credit course will examine constructions of criminality, historical shifts in punishment regimes, and the lived experience of incarceration. We will draw on classic sociological texts, as well as feminist, queer, and critical race theory. In so doing, we will develop an understanding of the interconnections between punishment regimes and other systems of social power. Students will learn to engage with, but also produce critical knowledge about punishment by conducting several small qualitative research assignments.

 

Related Courses

AHIS UN3313 Women Painters in Europe

Days and times: W 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: Michael Cole

Points: 4

Call Number: 19255

Description: This course studies gender gaps, their extent, determinants and consequences. The focus will be on the allocation of rights in different cultures and over time, why women’s rights have typically been more limited and why most societies have traditionally favored males in the allocation of resources. (Application Required)

 

ENGL UN3823 Austen & The Enlightenment Mind

Instructor: Katherine L Bergevin

Days and times: T 6:10pm-8:00pm

Points: 4

Call Number: 88746

Description: This course explores the conceptual origins of “sense” and “sensibility” in the work of the eighteenth-century’s most radical thinkers. We will discover how Jane Austen responded to and reformulated major intellectual and political debates of the Enlightenment, and so brought the novel to full fruition as a philosophical medium. We will ground our approach to Austen’s novels in contemporary theories of human behavior, psychology, and right–from Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who devised a system of education which might utterly subject the female spirit to male desire; to Mary Wollstonecraft and Ottobah Cugoano, whose philosophies respectively equate marriage with slavery, and urge slaves to rise and destroy their captors.  We will read in full most of Austen’s completed novels and a sampling of her juveneilia, as well as extensive excerpts from major philosophical works of the Enlightenment. Interspersed throughout the course will be a handful of landmark critical texts addressing the role of gender and race in Austen’s works. Students will leave the course Austen experts! They will also emerge well-versed in certain major arguments of Hume, Rousseau, and Wollstencraft, as well as a number of less-widely canonized authors whose works were nevertheless high highly influential in their time. The critical methods learned will provide students with a launching point for sophisticated, historically-based study of fascinating and challenging authors from any place and time.

 

ECON GU4480 Gender & Applied Economics

Instructor: Lena Edlund

Days and times: MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

Points: 3

Call Number: 29781

Description: This course studies gender gaps, their extent, determinants and consequences. The focus will be on the allocation of rights in different cultures and over time, why women’s rights have typically been more limited and why most societies have traditionally favored males in the allocation of resources.

 

CSER UN4360 America Diva: Race, Gender & Performance

Instructor: Deborah Paredez

Days and times: T 10:10am-12:00pm

Points: 3

Call Number: 28428

Description: This course studies gender gaps, their extent, determinants and consequences. The focus will be on the allocation of rights in different cultures and over time, why women’s rights have typically been more limited and why most societies have traditionally favored males in the allocation of resources.

 

HIST GR8938 Gender as Critique

Days and times: T/TH 10:10am – 11:25 am

Instructors: Camille A Robcis

Call number: 67897

Points: 4

Description:

 

HRTS GR5404 Human Rights of Women

Days and times: T/TH 10:10am – 11:25 am

Instructors: Sheila A Dauer

Call number: 29518

Points: 3

Description: This course introduces students to a range of obstacles that have arisen – and continue to arise – in the struggle to make sure that women are treated as full and legitimate bearers of human rights as well as some of the significant critiques that have emerged from this struggle. The course provides a historical overview of conflicts over women’s roles in family, the economy and the body politic and addresses gains women have made as well as challenges they face in relation to economic development, military conflict, domestic inequality, health, and religious and cultural beliefs. Materials provide a range of comparative views of advances and obstacles to women’s rights in Latin America, Asia, Africa, Europe and the U.S. Students will also learn about significant instruments, strategies, and movements intended to remedy the inequalities that affect women.

 

MDES GR8206 Psychoanalysis, Identity, Culture

Days and times: T 4:10pm – 6:00 pm

Instructors: Joseph A Massad

Call number: 72234

Points: 4

Description: This graduate seminar aims to introduce students to Freud and Freudian Psychoanalysis and the integration of both in critical theory. The main question the seminar aims to study is the formation of identity in psychoanalysis and how it relates to civilization and culture more generally, whether in its gender, sexual, or national configurations. The influence of Social Darwinism and Developmentalism more generally on Freudian psychoanalysis will be discussed as well as the importance of related temporal concepts deployed in psychoanalysis’ insistence on the divide between primitivism and culture. We will discuss a number of major scholarly works engaging Freud’s theories on all these questions and their relevance to social and cultural analysis.

Barnard Courses

ANTH BC3913 Inequalities: Race, Class, Gender

Days and times: M 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: John Salyer

Call number: 01205

Points: 4

Description: This class will examine the historical roots and ongoing persistence of social, economic, and political inequality and the continuing role that it plays in U.S. society by examining how such issues have been addressed both in social science and in law.

 

ACLS BC3450 Women & Leadership

Days and times: T 12:10pm-2:00pm OR W 10:10am-12:00pm

Instructor: Heather M Hurwitz

Call number: 09891

Points: 4

Description: Examination of the social conditions and linguistic practices that have shaped the historical and contemporary gendering of leadership, power, and authority in the United States and around the world. Through examples drawn from the social, political, and economic worlds, we will explore leadership in varying racial, class, and regional contexts.

 

ENGL BC3134 Unheard Voices: African Women

Days and times: 

Instructors: Yvette Christianse

Call number:

Points: 

Description: How does one talk of women in Africa without thinking of Africa as a ‘mythic unity’? We will consider the political, racial, social and other contexts in which African women write and are written about in the context of their located lives in Africa and in the African Diaspora.

 

ECON BC2010 The Economics of Gender

Days and times: T/TH 8:40am-9:55am

Instructor: Homa S Zarghamee

Call number: 06761

Points: 3

Description: Examination of gender differences in the U.S. and other advanced industrial economies. Topics include the division of labor between home and market, the relationship between labor force participation and family structure, the gender earnings gap, occupational segregation, discrimination, and historical, racial, and ethnic group comparisons.

 

HIST BC2010 Poverty, Race & Gender U.S.

Days and times: M/W 10:10am-11:25am

Instructor: Premilla Nadasen

Call number: 01348

Points: 3

Description: TBA

 

HIST BC3500 Nannies, Maids & Care Workers

Days and times: W 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: Premilla Nadasen

Call number: 01352

Points: 4

Description: This seminar explores themes from the American Revolution that pertain to the career of John Jay (King’s College class of 1764 and first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court). Themes will include: law and diplomacy, the American Enlightenment, slavery and abolition, women in the Revolution, Spain and the American West, the Constitution and the Supreme Court, early-national politics, and the “Jay Treaty” of 1795. Each student will write a research paper on a related topic over the course of the semester.

 

HIST BC3870 Gender & Migration: Global Perspective

Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: Jose Moya

Call number: 01354

Points: 4

Description: Explores migration as a gendered process and what factors account for migratory differences by gender across place and time; including labor markets, education demographic and family structure, gender ideologies, religion, government regulations and legal status, and intrinsic aspects of the migratory flow itself.

 

POLS BC3402 Comparative Politics of Gender Inequality

Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: Claire F. Ullman

Call number: 04616

Points: 3

Description: Uses major analytical perspectives in comparative politics to understand the persistence of gender inequality in advanced industrial states. Topics include: political representation and participation; political economy and capitalism; the historical development of welfare states; electoral systems, electoral quotas; the role of supranational and international organizations; and social policy.

 

PSYC BC3153 Psychology & Women

Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructor: Wendy McKenna

Call number: 01841

Points: 4

Description: Examines how female experience is and has been understood by psychologists. Through an understanding of gender as a social construction and issues raised by the intersections of gender, sexuality, class, and race, the course will analyze assumptions about what causes us to be gendered and about how being gendered affects behavior.

 

SOCI UN3301 Sociology of Gender

Days and times: MW 1:10pm-2:25pm

Instructor: Marnie F Brady 

Call number: 05599

Points: 3

Description: Examination of factors in gender identity that are both universal (across time, culture, setting) and specific to a social context. Social construction of gender roles in different settings, including family, work, and politics. Attention to the role of social policies in reinforcing norms or facilitating change.

 

SOCI BC3920 Adv Topics Gender & Sexuality

Days and times: TH 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructor: Elizabeth Bernstein

Call number: 01310

Points: 4

Description: This research and writing-intensive seminar is designed for senior majors with a background and interest in the sociology of gender and sexuality. The goal of the seminar is to facilitate completion of the senior requirement (a 25-30 page paper) based on “hands on” research with original qualitative data. Since the seminar will be restricted to students with prior academic training in the subfield, students will be able to receive intensive research training and guidance through every step of the research process, from choosing a research question to conducting original ethnographic and interview-based research, to analyzing and interpreting one’s findings. The final goal of the course will be the production of an original paper of standard journal-article length. Students who choose to pursue their projects over the course of a  second semester will have the option of revisiting their articles further for submission and publications.

 

Theatre UN3140 Performing Women

Days and times: W 12:10pm-2:00pm

Instructor: Shayoni Mitra

Call number: 05992

Points: 4

Description: This course examines the category of “woman” as it is mobilized in performance, considering both a variety of contemporary performances chosen from a wide range of genres and a diversity of critical/theoretical perspectives.

Spring 2018

WMST Courses

WMST UN1001 Intro to Women’s and Gender Studies

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40am-12:55pm

Call number: 67958

Points: 3

Instructor: Laura Ciolkowski/Deborah Valenze

Description:  An interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts and analytical categories in women’s and gender studies. This course grapples with gender in its complex intersection with other systems of power and inequality, including: sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and nation. Topics include: feminisms, feminist and queer theory, commodity culture, violence, science and technology, visual cultures, work, and family.

 

WMST UN3335 Gender and Wars: Perspectives from the Global South

Days and times: W 10:10am-12pm

Call number: 92397

Points: 3

Instructor: Selina Makana

Description: Wars are salient features of globalization. But, how can we understand the relationship between gender and war? How do notions of masculinities and femininities operate in the organizing, waging, protesting, and commemorating war? Starting from the premise that gender is crucial to explaining what happens in national revolutionary wars, postcolonial conflicts and civil wars, peacekeeping and humanitarian interventions, and the social and personal aspects when wars come to an end; this course considers a transnational feminist analysis to reflect on the relationship between gender and militarism. It pulls together literature from different disciplinary fields to explore the gendered dimensions of wars of national liberation, armed conflicts, wartime gender based/sexual violence, politics of victimhood, anti-war activism, resistance and agency. We will pay particular attention to case studies from the global South.

The gendered analyses of war will be explored from a multi-disciplinary framework including history, anthropology, sociology, political science, international relations, philosophy, literature and film. We will utilize film, journalistic accounts, ethnographic narratives and other resources to explore the complex ways in which people, especially men and women experience and respond to wars differently.

WMST UN3514 Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions

Days and times: W 2:10pm-4pm

Call number: 61229

Points: 4

Instructor: Saidiya Hartman

Description: This course will provide students with a comparative perspective on gender, race, and sexuality by illuminating historically specific and culturally distinct conditions in which these systems of power have operated across time and space. In particular, the course seeks to show how gender has not always been a binary or primary category system.  Such approach is also useful in understanding the workings of race and sexuality as mechanisms of differentiation.  In making these inquiries, the course will pay attention to the intersectional nature of race, gender, and sexuality and to strategic performances of identity by marginalized groups.

WMST GU4000 Genealogies of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Rights (sec 001)

Days and times: Tu 2:10pm-4pm

Call number: 75830

Points: 4

Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod

Description: The field of human rights, and the adjacent field of international women’s rights, have tended to be dominated by activists, lawyers, and policy-makers, many of whom leave unquestioned the underlying assumptions of the discourse of rights and leave unexamined the structural and institutional circuits of rights policy and practice. Those concerned with gender equity have been eager to extend the discourse of human rights to encompass women’s rights and sexual rights. Yet they too have only begun to think critically about the conceptual pitfalls and global circuitry of this form of politics. As some social thinkers note, both sides of the term “human rights” are ripe for critical rethinking:  the universality implied by the “human”—and by extension  “women” or “sexuality”–and the liberalism that makes “rights” the language of choice today in the search for justice. Although those working in multicultural settings or the international arena often invoke notions of culture, especially in framing dilemmas of intervention in terms of a clash between cultures and universal rights, it is important first to have the theoretical tools to develop adequate understandings of the dynamics of culture and the relationship between culture, social systems, and historical change.

This course will explore what theories of culture and ethnographies of particular communities, as well as other forms of regional knowledges, including the historical, have contributed to the development of thinking about the relationship between gender, rights. and culture. While appreciating the instrumental power and emancipatory possibilities of rights discourses in the sphere of gender and sexuality, whether around inequality or violence, it is also crucial to reflect on the recent challenges to this paradigm posed by questioning governmentality. This course requires instructor permission. Priority will be given to graduate students, including those fulfilling the requirements for the IRWGS graduate certificate. Qualified advanced undergraduates may apply for admission but are not guaranteed a place.

WMST GU4000 Genealogies of Feminism: Labor and Life (sec 002)

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4pm

Call number: 60925

Points: 4

Instructor: Neferti Xina Tadiar

Description: This advanced seminar examines materialist conceptions of labor and life as approached through feminist, anti-racist, queer, postcolonial, indigenous, and marxist perspectives. We will trace the ways that labor and life as well as their constitutive relations have been understood in historical and contemporary radical critiques of capitalism, with a focus on gender, race, sexuality and dispossession as analytical categories for understanding their shifting roles in structures and practices of social reproduction, the production and expropriation of value, the logic and exercise of violence, the organization of sociality and culture, and the practice and imagination of freedom, justice, and new forms and potentials of collective existence. Finally we will consider the limits and possibilities of different conceptions of “material life” for understanding politics today.

WMST GU4165 The Sexual Difference of Psychoanalysis

Days and times: Th 4:10pm-6pm

Call number: 

Points: 

Instructor: Marcus Coelen

Description: Psychoanalysis makes a difference.

This difference is both at its most fragile and most flagrant when it comes to sexuality. Since its invention by Freud, psychoanalysis may be seen as a place where sexuality, the difference that it makes in respect to any other determination of the “human”—philosophical, social, historical, or scientific—as well as the difference and differences that occur with and as the sexual, can invent their own language or speak in their own voice. And it cannot be excluded that these, language, voice, and speaking, appear in the name of a criticism or refusal of the very concepts linked to “sexual difference.” 

This seminar presents an occasion to read or reread some of the classical psychoanalytic texts on sex, sexuality, sexual difference, and sexuation as well as their commentaries, criticisms, or refutations.

The French contributions to this complex since the 1960s, coming from psychoanalysis as well as from philosophy and literature, have been extremely rich. Therefore, particular attention will be paid to some of these contributions.

WMST GU4506 Gender Justice

Days and times: M 2:10pm-4pm

Call number: 70748

Points: 3

Instructor: Katherine Franke

Description: This course will provide an introduction to the concrete legal contexts in which issues of gender and justice have been articulated, disputed and hesitatingly, if not provisionally, resolved. Readings will cover issues such as Workplace Equality, Sexual Harassment, Sex Role Stereotyping, Work/Family Conflict, Marriage and Alternatives to Marriage, Compulsory Masculinity, Parenting, Domestic Violence, Reproduction and Pregnancy, Rape, Sex Work & Trafficking. Through these readings we will explore the multiple ways in which the law has contended with sexual difference, gender-based stereotypes, and the meaning of equality in domestic, transnational and international contexts. So too, we will discuss how feminist theorists have thought about sex, gender and sexuality in understanding and critiquing our legal system and its norms.For more information, go to: http://web.law.columbia.edu/gender-sexuality/faculty/katherine-franke/gender-justice.

WMST GR8001 Feminist Pedagogy

Days and times: Tu 6:10-8:10pm

Call number: 62211

Points: 1

Instructor: Marianne Hirsch

Description: This is a course is oriented to graduate students who are thinking about issues in teaching in the near and distant future and want to explore issues related to pedagogy. The course will ask what it means to teach “as a feminist” and will explore how to create a classroom receptive to feminist and queer methodologies and theories regardless of course theme/content. Topics include: the role of political engagement, the gender dynamics of the classroom, and modes of critical thought and disagreement. Discussions can be oriented around student interest. The course will meet several times a month (dates TBD) and the final assignment is to develop a syllabus for a new gender/sexuality course in your field.  Because this course is required for graduate students choosing to fulfill Option 2 for the Graduate Certificate in Feminist Studies at IRWGS, priority will be given to graduate students completing the certificate.

This course does not meet weekly. There will be 4 – 5 sessions over the course of the semester, exact dates TBA.

 

Crosslisted Courses

ANTH UN2005 The Ethnographic Imagination

Days and times: MW 11:40am-12:55pm

Call number: 61687

Points: 3

Instructor: Lila Abu-Lughod

Description: Introduction to the theory and practice of “ethnography”—the intensive study of peoples’ lives as shaped by social relations, cultural images, and historical forces. Considers through critical reading of various kinds of texts (classic ethnographies, histories, journalism, novels, films) the ways in which understanding, interpreting, and representing the lived words of people—at home or abroad, in one place or transnationally, in the past or the present—can be accomplished.

 

CLCV UN3158 Women in Antiquity

Days and times: TR 2:40pm-3:55pm

Call number: 08872

Points: 3

Instructor: Kristina Milnor

Description: Examines the role of women in ancient Greek and Latin literature; the portrayal of women in literature as opposed to their actual social status; male and female in ancient Mediterranean cosmologies; readings from ancient epics, lyric drama, history, historical documents, medical texts, oratory, and philosophy, as well as from contemporary sociological and anthropological works that help to analyze the origins of the Western attitude toward women.

 

CLEN GU4905: The Antigone Project

Days and times: M 10:10pm-12:00pm

Call number: 11000

Points: 4

Instructor: Colm Toibin and Lisa Dwan

Description: This seminar will cover the translations of Antigone and the way that this text and story have been dealt with over the centuries, including: versions by Seamus Heaney, Anne Carson, Brecht, Kamila Shamsie, Jean Anouilh, and Athol Fugard. The course will also work with creative writing students, as they write their own versions, and performance students as they work out how the play in its versions could be produced.

In addition to reading versions of Antigone, the class examines how literature represents silence and outspokenness in a time of violence in the work of Seamus Heaney in Northern Ireland, Nadine Gordimer and J.M. Coetzee in South Africa, and Milosz and Herbert and Symborska from Poland, and in essays by James Baldwin.
Undergraduates and graduates are welcome to apply, but priority will be given to majors in English and Comparative Literature, IRWGS, performance and theatre, and creative writing.

 

CLEN GR6820 Studies in the Novel: Novel and Feminist Theory

Days and times: M 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 10632

Points: 4

Instructor: Marianne Hirsch

Description: N/A

 

ENGL GU4104 History of Sexuality

Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call number: 90948

Points: 4

Instructor: Julie Crawford

Description: This class is an introduction both to the study of the literature of the English Renaissance or early modern period, and to the study of the history of sexuality. While we will be looking at issues of sexuality in the literary texts that are at the center of this class, we will also be thinking about the history of sexuality as a field of study in its own right, how it’s been conceived of and practiced, its promises and pitfalls. We will be examining the humanist histories and methodologies that inform much Renaissance thought about  human sexuality – theories about bodies, desire, relationships between and among the sexes, materialism, and spirituality – as well as more recent critical approaches. We will think closely about the genres that (we think) privilege sexuality – eclogues, plays (especially those performed by boy players), erotic verse, verse letters, utopia and creation stories.

 

ENTA UN3939 Caryl Churchill Seminar

Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call number: 80947

Points: 4

Instructor: Jean Howards

Description: This undergraduate seminar looks at the entire dramatic career of Caryl Churchill, arguably England’s leading feminist dramatist. Beginning in the 1970s, when she wrote a series of plays on class and gender struggles in contemporary Britain and at earlier moment in England’s history, Churchill has staged explorations of some of the most pressing issues of our time: the destruction of the environment, the enduring and pernicious legacies of empire, the human suffering caused by unfettered capitalism, and the myriad ways in which women remain “the second sex.” Churchill’s feminism is intersectional, taking up questions of sex and gender in relation to other axes of social difference such as race and class. A committed theatrical experimentalist, Churchill constantly rethinks her theatrical practice while encouraging actors and directors, musicians and choreographers, to take an active role in shaping the final theatrical event. The class will explore Churchill’s canon for its themes and its stagecraft and will attend the spring production of her marvelous early play, Light Shining in Buckinghamshire, at The New York Theater Workshop.

 

GERM GU4350 German Film after 1945

Days and times: T 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 73760

Points: 3

Instructor: Claudia Breger

Description: Topic/Focus: Feelings. The course offers an introduction to German film since 1945 (in its European contexts) with a focus on ‘feelings.’ Methodologically highlighted by contemporary affect and emotion studies, feelings offer a lens for intersectional, multifaceted investigations of these cinematic histories. We will explore how feelings have been gendered and racialized; how they overlap with matters of sex (as closely associated with political revolt in Western Europe, while considered too private for public articulation in the socialist East, especially when queer); and how they foreground matters of nation and trauma (for example via the notions of German ‘coldness’ and inability to mourn the Holocaust). Simultaneously, the focus on feelings highlights questions of mediality (cinema as a prototypically affective medium?), genre and avant-garde aesthetics: in many films, ‘high-affect’ Hollywood cinema intriguingly meets ‘cold’ cinematic modernism. In pursuing these investigative vectors through theoretical readings and close film analysis, the course connects affect, gender, queer, and cultural studies approaches with cinema studies methodologies. The films discussed span postwar and New German Cinema, East German DEFA productions, the ‘Berlin School’ of the 2000s, and contemporary transnational cinema. The course is taught in English. All readings and films will be available in translation/with subtitles.

 

Related Courses

ACLS BC3450 Women and Leadership 

Days and times: T 12:10pm-2:00pm

Call number: 04851

Points: 4

Instructor: Heather M Hurwitz

Description: Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Limited to 15.   Examination of the social conditions and linguistic practices that have shaped the historical and contemporary gendering of leadership, power, and authority in the United States and around the world. Through examples drawn from the social, political, and economic worlds, we will explore leadership in varying racial, class, and regional contexts.

 

AFAS UN3930 Topics in the Black Experience: Black Sexual Diasporic Intimacy

Days and times: R 12:10pm-2:00pm

Call number: 26876

Points: 4

Instructor: Christine A Pinnock

Description: N/A

 

AFRS BC2006 Introduction African Diaspora

Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call number: 07625

Points: 3

Instructor: Yvette Christianse

Description: Interdisciplinary and thematic approach to the African diaspora in the Americas: its motivations, dimensions, consequences, and the importance and stakes of its study. Beginning with the contacts between Africans and the Portuguese in the 15th century, this class will open up diverse paths of inquiry as students attempt to answer questions, clear up misconceptions, and challenge assumptions about the presence of Africans in the ‘New World.’

 

AFRS BC3125 Diasporic Women at Work

Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call number: 02048

Points: 4

Instructor: Tamisha D Navarro

Description: This course is an exploration of different ways of conceptualizing the relationships between gender and labor over time, including critiques linking gendered labor to race and class. Grounded primarily in ethnography and political economy, we will look at some of the changes and continuities in the relationship between gender and forms of labor ranging from women in factories to affective labor/caring work in the African Diaspora, particularly the Caribbean and Latin America.

AFRS BC3552 Black Women Style and Performance

Days and times: W 10:10am-12:00pm

Call number: 09588

Points: 4

Instructor: Shirley Taylor

Description: N/A

 

AFRS BC3562 Caribbean Sexualities 

Days and times: W 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 05567

Points: 4

Instructor: Maja Horn

Description: The seminar offers an interdisciplinary study of sexualities in the Caribbean from the conquest to the contemporary moment. The principal focus will be on how sexualities intersect with questions of gender, race, nation, and diaspora in the Anglophone, Francophone and Spanish-speaking Caribbean. We will approach the study of Caribbean sexualities from various disciplines and areas of study, including history, anthropology, sociology, ethnomusicology, performance studies, literary studies, gender studies, cultural studies, and postcolonial theory. The first part of the seminar addresses Caribbean sexuality in the context of conquest, colonization and slavery, and then national independence. The remainder of the course addresses areas that have drawn particularly intense scholarly debates, including Caribbean family formation, masculinity, and same-sex desire, as well as sex tourism, and the gender and sexual politics of Caribbean popular music and dance.

 

AHIS BC3675 Feminism/Postmodernism in Art 

Days and times: TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

Call number: 06623

Points: 3

Instructor: Rosalyn Deutsche

Description: N/A

 

AHIS BC3929 Fashion Revolution

Days and times: W 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 05844

Points: 4

Instructor: Anne Higonnet

Description: N/A

 

ANTH BC3913 Inequalities: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality

Days and times: R 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call number: 04562

Points: 4

Instructor: John Salyer

Description: This class will examine the historical roots and ongoing persistence of social, economic, and political inequality and the continuing role that it plays in U.S. society by examining how such issues have been addressed both in social science and in law.

 

ECON GU4480 Gender and Applied Economics

Days and times: TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

Call number: 75105

Points: 3

Instructor: Lena Edlund

Description: Prerequisites: ECON W3211, W3213. This course studies gender gaps, their extent, determinants and consequences. The focus will be on the allocation of rights in different cultures and over time, why women’s rights have typically been more limited and why most societies have traditionally favored males in the allocation of resources.

 

ENGL BC3122 Creative Non-Fiction: Gendered Memoir 

Days and times: M 6:10pm-8:00pm

Call number: 07409

Points: 3-4

Instructor: Jennifer F Boylan

Description: Prerequisites: Writing sample required to apply: required cover sheet and instructions are available here. Students cannot add this course to their schedules until after they are admitted. A workshop in writing short autobiographical story with particular attention to the role gender plays in shaping experience. Focus on student writing, along with readings from the work of authors such as Augusten Buroughs; Alice Sebold; Alison Bechdel; Mary Karr, and others.

 

ENGL BC3907 Senior Seminar: Short Fiction and American Women 

Days and times: M 6:10pm-8:00pm

Call number: 00252

Points: 4

Instructor: Mary Gordon

Description: Prerequisites: Sign up through the “SR Seminar” section of myBarnard. Enrollment limited to senior Barnard English majors. (Formerly ENGL BC3997; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) We will explore the rich variety of fiction in shorter forms–short stories and novellas–written by American women. Writers to be studied will include Porter, Stafford, Welty, O’Connor, Olsen, Paley.

 

ENGL BC3909 Senior Seminar: Family in Fiction/Film

Days and times: R 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 02320

Points: 4

Instructor: Maura L Spiegel

Description: Looking closely at late Twentieth and Twenty-First Century stories, novels, memoir and films that center on the logic, dysfunction, romance, system, morphing, divorcing and curious maturation of the family. From Alison Bechdel’s graphic novel, Fun Home, to the Korean film, The Host, we will explore fresh and a few classic cinematic takes on this theme. We will explore renderings of “family cultures,” family feeling, family values, the family as a narrative configuration, and home as a utopian space, a nightmarish landscape, a memory palace and more. Authors and directors will include: Wes Anderson, Gaston Bachelard, Mira Bartok, Alison Bechdel, Joon-ho Bong, Jonathan Franzen, Vivien Gornick, Lasse Hallstrom, Tamara Jenkins, Ang Lee, Mike Leigh, Jim, Sheridan, Todd Solondz, Francois Truffaut, Tennessee Williams, D. W. Winnicott, Andrei Zvyagintsev.

ENGL BC3912 Senior Seminar: Utopias and Dystopias 

Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call number: 06866

Points: 4

Instructor: Anne L Prescott

Description: (Formerly ENGL BC3998; this course has been renumbered but has not changed in content.) A look first at Thomas More’s Utopia and then at the dreams or nightmares it inspired, whether hopeful, ironic, serious, parodic, speculative, nightmarish, or simply interrogatory. Authors include More, Rabelais, Bacon, Margaret Cavendish, William Morris, Bellamy, H.G. Wells, George Orwell, Ursula LeGuin and, if there is time, R.A. Lafferty’s scifi novel starring More and also a young adult novel by Lois Lowry.

 

GRKM GU4150 C.P. Cavafy and The Poetics of Desire

Days and times: T 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 23322

Points: 4

Instructor: Nikolas P. Kakkoufa

Description: This course takes C. P. Cavafy’s oeuvre as a departure point in order to discuss desire and the ways it is tied with a variety of topics. We will employ a number of methodological tools to examine key topics in Cavafy’s work such as eros, power, history, and gender. How can we define desire and how is desire staged, thematized, or transmitted through poetry? How does a gay poet write about desired bodies at the beginning of the previous century? What is Cavafy’s contribution to the formation of gay identities in the twentieth century? How do we understand the poet’s desire for an archive? How important is the city for activating desire? How do we trace a poet’s afterlife and how does the desire poetry transmits to readers transform through time? How does literature of the past address present concerns? These are some of the questions that we will examine during this course.

Though this course presupposes no knowledge of Modern Greek, students wanting to read Cavafy in the original are encouraged to take the 1-credit directed reading tutorial offered simultaneously.

 

HIST BC3788 Gender, Sexuality, Power, Africa

Days and times: T 6:10pm-8:00pm

Call number: 07888

Points: 4

Instructor: George A. Abosede

Description: Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. This course deals with the scholarship on gender and sexuality in African history. The central themes of the course will be changes and continuities in gender performance and the politics of gender and sexual difference within African societies, the social, political, and economic processes that have influenced gender and sexual identities, and the connections between gender, sexuality, inequality, and activism at local, national, continental, and global scales.

 

MUSI GR9405 Sexuality in Music/Dance Cultures 

Days and times: R 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call number: 62833

Points: 4

Instructor: Alessandra M Ciucci

Description: The objective of this seminar is to explore sexuality in music and dance cultures through an ethnographic perspective. We will examine relevant literature in ethnomusicology, anthropology, performance studies, and in other disciplines in which ethnography is an important component of methodology. A critical concern of this seminar is to analyze the influence that the globalization of sexuality has had on academic theories and writings on the subject. To this end, we will also look at the role played by works that challenge a universalization of sexuality.

 

MUSI UN2500 Women and Music

Days and times: MW 2:40pm-3:55pm

Call number: 18845

Points: 3

Instructor: Alessandra M Ciucci

Description: This course explores the relationship between women, music, and performance from a thematic and a cross-cultural perspective. Through the analysis of different case studies, we will investigate different topics from the perspective of ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, and performance studies. A number of critical questions we will consider include: how does a particular gender ideology constructs and is constructed by musical aesthetics? What are some of the critical roles for women in performance?  What is the significance of gender in performances? What does it mean for women to have have and to be the voice? And how is a musical performance bound up with emotions?

 

MUSI GR9405 Sexuality in Music and Dance Cultures

Days and times: R 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call number: 62833

Points: 4

Instructor: Alessandra M Ciucci

Description: The objective of this seminar is to explore sexuality in music and dance cultures through an ethnographic perspective. We will examine relevant literature in ethnomusicology, anthropology, performance studies, and in other disciplines in which ethnography is an important component of methodology. A critical concern of this seminar is to analyze the influence that the globalization of sexuality has had on academic theories and writings on the subject. To this end, we will also look at the role played by works that challenge a universalization of sexuality.

 

POLS BC3445 Colloquium: Gender and Public Policy 

Days and times: T 12:00pm-1:50pm

Call number: 05526

Points: 4

Instructor: Katherine L Krimmel

Description: In this course, we will examine how notions of sex and gender have shaped public policies, and how public policies have affected the social, economic, and political citizenship of men and women in the United States over time.

 

PORT UN3490 Formations of Gender, Popular Culture and Nation in Brazil and the Lusophone World

Days and times: M/W 2:40pm – 3:55pm

Call number: 21198

Points: 3

Instructor: Daniel da Silva

Description: From carnival to kuduro, Beyoncé to Carmen Miranda, gender and sexuality have been shaped through popular culture into bodies of cultural heritage or dissent in narratives and projects of nation-building. This course will consider how they are mediated, their intersections with race, and their roles in the contemporary history of Brazil along with its intersections with the broader Lusophone World and cultures of African Diaspora from Angola to New York. Through an analysis of music,film, social media, literature and performance, we will locate these bodies, the genres within which they emerge or are occluded, and consider how they matter to the nation.

 

PSYC BC3152 Psychological Aspects of Human Sexuality 

Days and times: M 11:00am-12:50pm

Call number: 01798

Points: 4

Instructor: Wendy McKenna

Description: Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, BC1001 and two other psychology courses and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20 students. This seminar is a critical examination of research and theory in human sexuality.  The first part of the course is an overview of influential social science research on sexuality during the 20th century.  The second part is a detailed investigation of contemporary research and writing on selected issues in human sexual behavior, including sexual socialization, gender and sexuality, and contemporary approaches to understanding psychosexual disorders.

 

PSYC BC3675 Feminism/Post-Modernism in Art

Days and times: TR 1:10pm-2:25pm

Call number: 06623

Points: 3

Instructor: Rosalyn Deutsche

Description: N/A

 

SOCI UN3261 Sexuality and Society

Days and times: TR 10:10am-11:25am

Call number: 76216

Points: 3

Instructor: Teresa Sharpe

Description: The purpose of this course is to explore the relationship between sexuality and society. Our aim is to provide an enormously broad introduction to this topic area, covering historical and national variation, exploring biological, psychological, historical, and sociological texts, and thinking critically about issues such as reproduction, desire, and identity. These readings can, at times, be demanding. Some will cover genetics; others will contain relatively dense cultural theory.

 

SOCI UN3265 Sociology of Work and Gender

Days and times: TR 11:40am-12:55pm

Call number: 23360

Points: 3

Instructor: Teresa Sharpe

Description: This course examines gender as a flexible but persistent boundary that continues to organize our work lives and our home lives, as well as the relationship between the two spheres. We will explore the ways in which gender affects how work is structured; the relationship between work and home; the household as a place of paid (and unpaid) labor; and how changes in the global economy affect gender and work identities.

 

SOCI BC3920 Advanced Topics Gender and Sexuality

Days and times: M 2:10pm-4:00pm

Call number: 03920

Points: 4

Instructor: Mignon R Moore

Description: This research and writing-intensive seminar is designed for senior majors with a background and interest in the sociology of gender and sexuality. The goal of the seminar is to facilitate completion of the senior requirement (a 25-30 page paper) based on “hands on” research with original qualitative data. Since the seminar will be restricted to students with prior academic training in the subfield, students will be able to receive intensive research training and guidance through every step of the research process, from choosing a research question to conducting original ethnographic and interview-based research, to analyzing and interpreting one’s findings. The final goal of the course will be the production of an original paper of standard journal-article length. Students who choose to pursue their projects over the course of a  second semester will have the option of revisiting their articles further for submission and publications.

 

SOCI BC3933 Sociology of the Body

Days and times: W 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 03303

Points: 4

Instructor: Elizabeth Bernstein

Description: This seminar examines the ways in which the body is discursively constituted, and itself serves as the substratum for social life. Key questions include: How are distinctions made between “normal” and “pathological” bodies, and between the “psychic” and “somatic” realms? How do historical forces shape bodily experience? How do bodies that are racialized, gendered, and classed offer resistance to social categorization?

 

SOCI BC3935 Gender and Organizations

Days and times: TR 12:00pm-2:00pm

Call number: 08844

Points: 4

Instructor: Heather M Hurwitz

Description: This course examines the sociological features of organizations through a gender lens. We will analyze how gender, race, class, and sexuality matter for individuals and groups within a variety of organizational contexts. The course is grounded in the sociological literatures on gender and organizations.

 

WMST BC2140 Critical Approaches in Social and Cultural Theory

Days and times: Tu/Th 10:10a – 11:25p

Call number: 09334

Points: 3

Instructor: Alex Pittman

Description: Introduction to key concepts from social theory as they are appropriated in critical studies of gender, race, sexuality, class and nation. We will explore how these concepts are taken up from different perspectives to address particular social problems, and the effects of these appropriations in the world.

 

WMST BC2150 Practicing Intersectionality

Days and times: MW 11:40am-12:55pm

Call number: 05499

Points: 3

Instructor: Lori Brooks

Description: This introductory course for the Interdisciplinary Concentration or Minor in Race and Ethnicity (ICORE/MORE) is open to all students. We focus on the critical study of social difference as an interdisciplinary practice, using texts with diverse modes of argumentation and evidence to analyze social differences as fundamentally entangled and co-produced. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this course, Professor Jordan-Young will frequently be joined by other faculty from the Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (CCIS), who bring distinct disciplinary and subject matter expertise. Some keywords for this course include hybridity, diaspora, borderlands, migration, and intersectionality.

 

WMST BC3132 Gendered Controversies

Days and times: T 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 05173

Points: 4

Instructor: Janet Jakobsen

Description: Investigates the significance of contemporary and historical issues of social, political, and cultural conflicts centered on women’s bodies. How do such conflicts constitute women, and what do they tell us about societies, cultures, and politics?

 

WMST BC3512 Art/Work: Sex, Aesthetic, Capitalism

Days and times: W 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 07390

Points: 4

Instructor: Alexander Pittman

Description: Prerequisites: none How can performances, theatrical texts, and other art/media objects illuminate the operations of gender, sexuality, and race in global capitalism? Drawing from a range of artistic media and critical traditions, we explore how aesthetic thought can help us analyze the sexual, racial, and national character of contemporary labor and life.

 

WMST BC3530 Feminist Media Theory

Days and times: W 12:10pm-2:00pm

Call number: 08866

Points: 4

Instructor: Jonathan L Beller

Description: The integration of contemporary media and social practices of all types is intensifying. This seminar examines media theory and various media platforms including Language, Photography, Film, Television, Radio, Digital Video, and Computing as treated by feminists, critical race and queer theorists, and other scholars and artists working from the margins.

 

WMST GU4302 2nd Wave and Jewish Women’s Art

Days and times: M 4:10pm-6:00pm

Call number: 00295

Points: 4

Instructor: Irena Klepfisz

Description: Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 13 students. A study of  Jewish women’s fiction, memoirs, art and film in response to the feminist/gender issues raised by the Second Wave. The seminar includes analysis of the writings and artwork of Jo Sinclair, Tillie Olsen, Judy Chicago, Helene Aylon, Elana Dykewomon, Rebecca Goldstein, E.M. Broner and others.

Fall 2017

WMST Courses

WMST 2140 Critical Approaches to Feminist Questions

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40 am – 12:55 pm

Call number: 02265

Points: 3

Instructor: Alex Pittman

Description: Introduction to key concepts from social theory as they are appropriated in critical studies of gender, race, sexuality, class and nation. We will explore how these concepts are taken up from different perspectives to address particular social problems, and the effects of these appropriations in the world.

WMST 3125 Introduction to Sexuality Studies

Days and times: M/W 2:40 pm – 3:55 pm

Instructors: Jack Halberstam

Location: 516 Hamilton Hall

Points: 3

This course is designed to introduce major theories sexuality, desire and identity. We will be considering the relations between the history of sexuality and the politics of gender. We will read some primary texts in gender theory, and in the study of sexuality, desire, and embodiment. This course also provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary examination of human sexual and erotic desires, orientations, and identities. We will study how desires are constructed, how they vary and remain the same in different places and times, and how they interact with other social and cultural phenomena such as government, family, popular culture, scientific inquiry, and, especially, race and class.

WMST 3311 Feminist Theory

Days and times: T 10:10am-12:00pm

Instructors: Tina Campt

Location: 318 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

Call number: 03462

Points: 4

Prerequisites: LIMITED TO 20 BY INSTRUC PERM; ATTEND FIRST CLASS An exploration of the relationship between new feminist theory and feminist practice, both within the academy and in the realm of political organizing.

WMST 3312 Theorizing Women’s Activism

Days and times: T 2:10pm-4:00pm

Location: 227 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

Call number: 01401

Points: 4

Instructor: Janet Jakobsen

Description: Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or Feminist Theory or permission of instructor. Helps students develop and apply useful theoretical models to feminist organizing on local and international levels.  It involves reading, presentations, and seminar reports.  Students use first-hand knowledge of the practices of specific women’s activist organizations for theoretical work.

WMST 3450 Topics in Gender and Sexuality Law

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4:00pm

Location: 754 EXT Schermerhorn Hall [SCH]

Call number: 82296

Points: 3

Instructor: Suzanne Goldberg

Description: As society shifts in its views about sexuality and gender, so too does the law.  Indeed, legal developments in this area have been among the most dynamic of the past couple of decades.  Yet law does not map easily or perfectly onto lived experience, and legal arguments do not necessarily track the arguments made in public debate.
In this seminar, we will explore the evolving jurisprudence of sexuality and gender law in a variety of areas.  Our goal throughout the semester will be to understand and think about these issues as lawyers do – with our primary focus on understanding and evaluating the arguments that can be made on both (or all) sides of any particular case, with some attention to the factors outside of the courtroom that might shape how courts approach their work.  Related to this, we will also seek to understand how and why some of the jurisprudence has changed over time.

WMST 3514 Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions

Days and times: R 4:10pm-6:00pm

Location: TBA

Call number: 05571

Points: 4

Instructor: Alex Pittman

Description: This course will provide students with a comparative perspective on gender, race, and sexuality by illuminating historically specific and culturally distinct conditions in which these systems of power have operated across time and space. In particular, the course seeks to show how gender has not always been a binary or primary category system.  Such approach is also useful in understanding the workings of race and sexuality as mechanisms of differentiation.  In making these inquiries, the course will pay attention to the intersectional nature of race, gender, and sexuality and to strategic performances of identity by marginalized groups.

WMST 3521 Senior Seminar I

Days and times: T 10:10 – 12:00pm

Location: 754 EXT Schermerhorn Hall

This course offers you the opportunity to develop a capstone.

WMST 3525 Senior Seminar I: Knowledge, Practice, Power

Days and times: T 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructors: Janet R. Jakobsen

Location: 805 Altschul Hall (Barnard)

Call number: 08939

Points: 4

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to senior majors. The Senior Seminar in WGSS offers you the opportunity to develop a capstone research project during the first semester of your senior year. The capstone project may be freestanding, or, with permission of the instructor, may be continued during the spring semester as a Senior Thesis.  The capstone project must be based on original research and involve an interdisciplinary approach to the study of women, sexuality, and/or gender. You must work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of your project and who can advise you on the specifics of method and content. Your grade for the semester with be determined by the Senior Seminar instructor in consultation with your advisor.

WMST 3785 Narrating Rape: Literature, Gender and Violence

Days and times: T 2:10 – 4:00pm

Instructors: Marianne Hirsch

Call number: 25033

Points: 4

Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission.

(Seminar).  Despite the fact that gender-based violence destroys the frameworks of identity and community, testimony and truth, memory and justice, rape has been a fundamental and globally pervasive literary and artistic theme and trope, often the very act that engenders representation, narrative and plot.  This seminar will explore how rape has been imaged, written and told in the face of its unspeakability and the silences surrounding it, and how the act of bearing witness can become an act of resistance, rebuilding voice, subjectivity and community.  Literary texts will be read alongside feminist theoretical work on gender-violence, embodiment, trauma, testimony and law.

Requirements: class attendance and participation, weekly one-page postings on the readings, two 8-10 page papers.

Application instructions:E-mail Professor Marianne Hirsch (mh2349@columbia.edu) with the subject heading “Narrating Rape seminar.” In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

WMST 3915 Gender and Power in Global Perspective

Days and times: W 4:10pm-6:00pm

Location: 754 EXT Schermerhorn Hall [SCH]

Call number: 02432

Points: 4

Instructor: Selina Makana

Description:

Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or the instructor’s permission.

Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally, as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work and trafficking, feminist politics, and human rights.

If it is a small world after all, how do forces of globalization shape and redefine both men’s and women’s positions as as workers and political subjects? And, if power swirls everywhere, how are transnational power dynamics reinscribed in gendered bodies? How is the body represented in discussions of the political economy of globalization? These questions will frame this course by highlighting how gender and power coalesce to impact the lives of individuals in various spaces including workplaces, the home, religious institutions, refugee camps, the government, and civil society, and human rights organizations. We will use specific sociological and anthropological case studies, to look at how various regimes of power operate to constrain individuals as well as give them new spaces for agency.This course will enable us to think transnationally, historically, and dynamically, using gender as a lens through which to critique relations of power and the ways that power informs our everyday lives and identities.

WMST GR 6001 Theoretical Paradigms: Feminist Practice

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm

Instructors: Saidiya V Hartman

Location: 754 EXT Schermerhorn Hall [SCH]

Call number: 67300

Points: 4

TBA

WMST GR8010 Advanced Topics: Ecofeminism

Days and times: M 12:10pm-2:00pm

Instructors: Branka Arsic

Location: 754 EXT Schermerhorn Hall [SCH]

Call number: 75780

Points: 4

The course will reconstruct the major arguments formulated by ecofeminist theorists by reading some of the major ecological treatises of the 19th and 20th centuries, and by introducing some of the questions that have preoccupied feminist philosophers in the last couple of decades. We will thus begin by inquiring into how philosophers, and later ecologists, from Schelling, Hegel and Nietzsche to Jakob von Uexküll, Simone Weil, and Gilles Deleuze, understood the earth, matter, and life on earth, before moving to discuss questions of gendered subjectivity and embodied personhood as formulated in the works of Simone de Beauvoir (selections from The Ethics of Ambiguity), Luce Irigaray (selections from The Forgetting of Air, Marine Lover) and Julia Kristeva (selections from Black Sun and Tales of Love). In this introductory part of the course we will pay special attention to how feminist thinkers developed a philosophy of elements and vegetal life in order to articulate aspects of the feminine, or what some of them also called “woman’s” subjectivity.

WMST GU4310 Contemporary American Jewish Women’s Literature

Days and times: M 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructors: Irena Klepfisz

Location: 306 Milbank Hall (Barnard)

Call number: 07495

Points: 4

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Sophomore standing. Identifies trends in Jewish American women’s writing of this period: integration of Jewish and feminist consciousness into Jewish women’s mainstream writing; exploration through fictive narratives of women’s roles in Jewish orthodox communities; recording of experiences of immigrants from the former Soviet Union and from Arab countries.

Crosslisted Courses

AMST UN3930 Topics in American Studies: Gender History and American Film

Days and times: Tues 10:10 – 12:00 pm

Instructors: Hilary Anne Hallett

Location: 317 Hamilton Hall

Call number: 22188

Points: 4

Please refer to the Center for American Studies for the course descriptions for each section.

CLFR UN3617 Writing Women in Medieval France and England

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4:00pm

Instructors: Eliza Zingesser

Call number: 22198

Points: 3

Description: 

This course is an introduction both to the works of women who either lived in France or adopted French as a literary language in the Middle Ages, as well as to works commenting on the role of women, often from an antifeminist viewpoint. Our explorations will take us across a wide range of genres, from poetry to legal documents to mystical treatises to romances.
Class discussion in English, with readings available in both modern French and English. The course can be taken for French credit if students complete the reading and all assignments in French.

CPLS GR6350 Subjectivity and Power

Days and times: T 4:10 – 6pm

Call number: 11648

Points: 4

Instructor: Simona Forti

Description: Contemporary political-philosophical debate revolves around the question of new forms of power, from biopower to governmentality. Many authors involved, from Giorgio Agamben to Nikolas Rose, claim to be developing core ideas put forward by Michel Foucault: mainly, Foucault’s insight concerning the inextricable tangle of subjectivity and power relations which, accordingly, dismantels the classical liberal and juridical view of the face-off between “the individual – the state.” While they provide original analyses of the functioning of the new forms of power, they nevertheless neglect to delve deeply into the folds of subjectivity.

The course traces a philosophical genealogy of the interrelation between subjectivity, power, and domination in order to shed light on the subjective side of this relation. Readings from Friedrich Nietzsche, Hannah Arendt, Michel Foucault, Primo Levi, Jacques Derrida Judith Butler, will allow us to raise questions that often remain unthought, such as:  What is the structure of a subjectivity that easily slides into domination? What desires motivate our attachment to constraining powers, and from where does our anxiety to conform stem? At the same time, drawing on the writings of these authors, we will ask ourselves how to envisage the conditions of possibility for a resistant subject, for an idea of the Self that is capable of creating friction with domination. Far from being a return to the monism of individualism, this Self will turn out to be an “an-archic” subject that blurs the boundaries between ethics and politics.

PHIL UN2110 Philosophy and Feminism

Days and times: MW 11:40am-12:55pm

Instructors: Christia Mercer

Location: 833 Seeley W. Mudd Building

Call number: 19570

Points: 3

Is there an essential difference between women and men? How do questions about race conflict or overlap with those about gender? Is there a “normal” way of being “queer”? Introduction to philosophy and feminism through a critical discussion of these and other questions using historical and contemporary texts, art, and public lectures. Focus includes essentialism, difference, identity, knowledge, objectivity, and queerness.  This course will have unrestricted enrollment and no required discussion section.

PORT GR6004 Race, Gender, and Affect in Brazilian Perspective

Days and times: M 1pm – 3pm

Instructors: Ana Paulina Lee

Location: 505 Casa Hispánica

Call number: 78496

Points: 4

This graduate seminar will examine affect, mood, taste, and feeling as critical sites in Brazilian studies about race and gender. Particular attention will be paid to the “affective turn” in critical race and queer theory. We will examine a number of issues related to affect theory, beginning with, what is affect? Can we study affect historically and geographically? How is affect racialized or gendered? What can affect theory bring to cultural memory studies? By drawing on theories of affect, cultural memory, food studies, historical and anthropological studies about racial and ethnic formation, and gender and sexuality studies, we will discuss how affect illuminates the intersecting realms of aesthetics, politics, performance, and cultural memory, and across bodies in mundane and spectacular ways.

Class will be conducted in English or Portuguese, depending on enrollment.

PORT UN3327 Visual Cultures and Ethnicities of Latin America

Days and times: Tues 1:00pm-4:00pm

Instructors: Ana Paulina Lee

Call number: 82346

Points: 3

This course is a comparative study of the cultures and ethnicities of Latin America, with a focus on Asian migration, settlement, and visual culture. Course readings, in-class mapping workshops, and discussions will examine Asian diasporic artistic production, performance, and visual cultures. We will pair visual and cultural analysis with studies about spatial theory and cultural geography, including the relationship between perception and space to race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender. We will question how visual culture, artistic practice, and performance have interrupted static understandings of ethnicity, race, gender, and sexuality. We will read theories about cultural hybridity, performance, affect, memory, and migration and examine artistic production from Latin America. We will also analyze the symbolic value and socio-economic positions of ethnic neighborhoods like Chinatown in Cuba or Japantown in Brazil. In addition, we will examine representations of Asian-ness in a variety of popular culture and media. Using mapping software, students will create digital media projects that highlight Asian diasporic artistic practices in Latin America.

SOCI UN3261 Sexuality & Society

Days and times: MW 1:10-2:25pm

Instructors: Shamus Khan

Call number: 63478

Points: 3

The purpose of this course is to explore the relationship between sexuality and society. Our aim is to provide an enormously broad introduction to this topic area, covering historical and national variation, exploring biological, psychological, historical, and sociological texts, and thinking critically about issues such as reproduction, desire, and identity. These readings can, at times, be demanding. Some will cover genetics; others will contain relatively dense cultural theory.

Related Courses in other Departments

AFAS GU4080 Topics in the Black Experience: gender, Sexuality and Labor in the Caribbean

Days and times: Thurs 12:10 – 2:00 pm

Location: 758 EXT Schermerhorn Hall

Instructor: Christine A Pinnock

Description: Please refer to Institute for Research in African American Studies for section-by-section course descriptions.

AFAS GU4080 Topics in the Black Experience: MLK Jr and Radical Democracy

Days and times: W 12:10 pm – 2:00 pm

Location: 758 Extension Schermerhorn

Points: 4

Instructor: Obery Hendricks

Description: Please refer to Institute for Research in African American Studies for section-by-section course descriptions.

AFRS BC3550 Gay Harlem

Days and times: M 2:10 – 4:00 pm

Instructor: Richard Blint

Description: Prerequisites: This course is limited to 20 students and by permission only. This course explores Harlem’s role in the production of sexual modernity and in particular as a space of queer encounter. While much of our investigation will be devoted to the intersection of race and sexuality in African American life, we also consider Harlem’s history as a communal space for Italian, Puerto Rican, and more recent immigrants. Students will be encouraged to distinguish and connect contemporary sites of sexual culture in Harlem to the historical articulations of race and sexuality examined in the course.

CLFR UN3716 Francophone Romance, Love, and Sex

Days and times: Thurs 11:40am-12:55pm

Instructors: Madeleine Dobie

Description: Comparative Literature: French

CSER UN3922 Asian American Cinema

Days and times: Thurs 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructor: Eric Gamalinda

Description: This seminar focuses on the critical analysis of Asian representation and participation in Hollywood by taking a look at how mainstream American cinema continues to essentialize the Asian and how Asian American filmmakers have responded to Hollywood Orientalist stereotypes. We will analyze various issues confronting the Asian American, including yellowface, white patriarchy, male and female stereotypes, the “model minority” myth, depictions of “Chinatowns,” panethnicity, the changing political interpretations of the term “Asian American” throughout American history, gender and sexuality, and cultural hegemonies and privileging within the Asian community.

CSER UN4360 American Diva: Race, Gender, and Performance

Days and times: Tuesday 10:10am-12:00pm

Instructor: Deborah Paredez

ECON BC2010 The Economics of Gender

Days and times: Thurs 10:10am-11:25am

Instructor: Homa S Zarghamee

Description: Examination of gender differences in the U.S. and other advanced industrial economies. Topics include the division of labor between home and market, the relationship between labor force participation and family structure, the gender earnings gap, occupational segregation, discrimination, and historical, racial, and ethnic group comparisons.

ENGL UN3305 Gender and Sexuality in the Irish Novel

Days and times: Tues 4:10pm-6:00pm

Instructor: Emily Bloom

Description: This course will chart changing attitudes towards gender and sexuality from the nineteenth to the twentieth century in terms of the development of novelistic genres. These genres include marriage plot novels in which the 1800 Act of Union was figured as a marriage between a feminized Ireland and a masculine England, the Big House novel—an Irish variant of the country house novel—pioneered by women writers, the gothic novel by writers like Oscar Wilde, the modernist novels of James Joyce and Elizabeth Bowen, banned books that were silenced by national censorship boards, and finally the queer Irish novel of the late twentieth century.

HIST GR8770 Household and Family in African History

Days and times: Tues 10:10am-12:00pm

Instructor: Rhiannon Stephens

Description: The household and family loomed large in the colonial ethnographies of Africa of the twentieth century. But in the imaginings of those anthropologists, household and family were eternal structures; they were institutions without history. Historical scholarship and later anthropologists have challenged that notion and shown that these were and are complicated and diverse social institutions with specific histories and consequences. This course puts the anthropological theories of household and family in Africa into conversation with historical scholarship on them. In so doing, we will explore questions of lineage, marriage, gender and kinship, which have often been invoked as explanatory factors in historical processes, but all of which need to be historicized themselves.

HIST GU4217 Women as Cold War Weapons

Days and times: Wed 12:10pm-2:00pm

Points: 4

Instructor: Victoria Phillips

Description: Cold War ideological campaigns for the “hearts and minds” abutted “hot war” confrontations between 1945 and 1991, and women engaged with both. This course has three purposes: (i) to examine the role of women in the United States as a reflection and enactment of Cold War politics; (ii) to provide an understanding of cultural forces in building ideas in foreign markets; (iii) to reframe the understanding of power as a strategy of United States Cold War battles. To this end, the class will open with a history and examination of women and the traditional narratives of the nation at “wars,” and then continue to explore the political power of women, cultural diplomacy, military operations, and conclude with two case studies. This seminar examines the history of government and private sector mechanisms used to export national ideals by and about women in order to enact American foreign policy agendas in the Cold War. To build their knowledge, students will be asked to parse primary materials in the context of secondary readings. They will do class presentations and present at a conference, and will have the opportunity to discuss their interests with leading scholars of the Cold War. The requirements include significant weekly readings, postings, attendance at discussions, a class presentation, and participation in the class conference at the conclusion of the semester.

HSEA GU4893 East Asian: The Family in Chinese History

Days and times: Tues 4:10 – 6:00 pm

Instructor: Robert P Hymes

Description: History: East Asian

HSEA GU4893 East Asian: The Family in Chinese History

Days and times: Tues 4:10 – 6:00 pm

Instructor: Robert P Hymes

MDES GR8280 Study of Gender and Sexuality in the Arabic World

Days and times: Tuesdays 4:10-6pm

Location: TBA

Call number: 98697

Points: 4

Instructor: Joseph A Massad

Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission. This course aims to familiarize graduate students with the different methods and approaches that US and European scholars have used to study gender and sexuality in other societies generally, and the way they study them in the context of the Arab World specifically. The course will also explore how Arab scholars have also studied their own societies. We will survey these different approaches, both theoretical and empirical, outlining their methodological difficulties and limitations. Readings will consist of theoretical elaborations of these difficulties and the methodological and empirical critiques that the field itself has generated in order to elaborate how gender and sexuality in the Arab World have been studied, or more accurately, not studied, and how many of these methodological pitfalls can be avoided.

MUSI GR8370 Ruth Crawford Seeger

Days and times: Monday 12:10-2pm

Instructors: Ellie M. Hisama

Location: TBA

Call number: 23043

Points: 3

POLS BC3402 The Comparative Politics of Gender Inequality

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm

Location: TBA

Call number: 04616

Points: 3

Instructor: Claire F Ullman

Prerequisites: Not an introductory-level course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC 3507. Enrollment limited to 20 students; L-course sign-up through eBearBarnard syllabus. Uses major analytical perspectives in comparative politics to understand the persistence of gender inequality in advanced industrial states. Topics include: political representation and participation; political economy and capitalism; the historical development of welfare states; electoral systems, electoral quotas; the role of supranational and international organizations; and social policy

RUSS GR6141 Women’s AutoBi. Prose 18th&19th Century

Days and times: MW 4:10-6pm

Location: TBA

Call number: 13306

Points: 4

Instructor: Irina Reyfman

The course examines the emergence of women autobiographical prose in the late eighteenth century and the rapid growth of women’s interest autobiographical genres in the course of the nineteenth century.  Often illiterate or semi-literate in the early modern period, women became expert writers by the second third of the nineteenth century.  The reading list includes memoirs and diaries of some of the most remarkable autobiography writers of the period, including Nadezhda Durova, who lived most of her life as a man and took part in the War of 1812; Avdotia Panaeva, Nikolai Nekrasov’s common-law wife and active participant in journalistic life of the period; Sofia Tolstaya, Leo Tolstoy’s wife and herself an outstanding writer.

PSYC BC3153 Psychology and Women

Days and times: M 11:10am-12:50pm

Location: TBA

Call number: 01841

Points: 4

Instructor: Wendy McKenna

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and at least two psychology courses. Permission of the instructor required for majors other than Psychology or Women’s Studies. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Examines how female experience is and has been understood by psychologists. Through an understanding of gender as a social construction and issues raised by the intersections of gender, sexuality, class, and race, the course will analyze assumptions about what causes us to be gendered and about how being gendered affects behavior.

Spring 2017

WMST 1001 Intro to Women’s and Gender Studies

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40 am – 12:55 pm
Instructors: Laura Ciolkowski
Location: 405 Milbank Hall
Points: 3

An interdisciplinary introduction to key concepts and analytical categories in women’s and gender studies. This course grapples with gender in its complex intersection with other systems of power and inequality, including: sexuality, race and ethnicity, class and nation. Topics include: feminisms, feminist and queer theory, commodity culture, violence, science and technology, visual cultures, work, and family.

WMST 3514 Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions: Debates on Women in the PreModern World

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Instructors: Julie A. Crawford
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext

This class is an introduction to the debates on women that played a dominant role in both the philosophical and literary traditions of the European/Atlantic world from the classical period through the seventeenth-century. Beginning with the works of ancient political theory that actively debated women’s political, social, and ethical position in society (chiefly Aristotle, Plato, and Plutarch), the course will address the pan-European books of “Good Women” that served as exemplary case studies, the querelle des femmes (or debate on women) that dominated political and humanist discourse of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and the crucial importance of the political analogies between the household and the state and the marital and social contracts in the premodern world (and, indeed, in our own).  We will study works from ancient Greece and Rome and medieval and early modern Italy, Spain, France, England, Ethiopia and Mexico, and topics ranging from domestic violence and political resistance theory to transvestitism and lesbianism.

WMST 3522 Senior Seminar II

Days and times: W 10:10a – 12p
Instructors: Patricia A. Dailey
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Points: 3

Individual research in Women’s Studies conducted in consultation with the instructor. The result of each research project is submitted in the form of the senior essay and presented to the seminar.

WMST 3800 Feminist Listening

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4pm
Instructors: Ellie M. Hisama
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext

Feminist Listening: Critical and Intersectional Approaches to Popular Music develops modes of feminist listening to a variety of examples in popular music including hip-hop,
pop, rock, R&B, country music, and crossover/experimental music. By examining the sonic, texted, and visual components of popular music in relation to gender, sexuality, the body, race, ethnicity, economics, and nation, students will develop a critical vocabulary for discussing and analyzing the effects and meanings of popular music as filtered by twenty-first century listeners. Through close listening, discussion of assigned readings and pieces, and analytical writing on recorded and live performances, the course will encourage students to examine a wide repertory of popular music by using a variety of intersectional analytical “sieves,” refining and enriching their experience of popular music as critically astute listeners and writers.

This course is designed for students who are interested in sharpening their listening practices but does not assume previous formal study of music. The course 1) introduces the fundamental of music through exercises in listening and writing, 2) focuses on a selection of current literature on listening, theoretical approaches to music analysis, and feminist/queer criticism; 3) attunes students to the various indices of musical structure (melody, form, harmony, rhythm & meter, words, flow & groove, performance); 4) brings together these parts of music into feminist/queer, alternative hearings of specific works.

 

WMST 4000 Genealogies of Feminism: Vision and Difference

Days and times: Tu 4:10-6pm
Instructors: Marianne Hirsch
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext

Even before Laura Mulvey’s classic feminist essay on the “male gaze,” feminist artists and filmmakers, as well as theorists of visuality, have analyzed, critiqued and contested the association of vision with power and knowledge. Creatively reframing the gaze and subverting conventions of visual representation, they have reimagined the relationship of media technologies to embodied and social difference, and to social constructions of gender, race, class and sexuality. This course will study these theories and practices by looking at late 20th and early 21st century painting, film, television, photography, comics, performance, activism and social media in transnational perspective.

WMST 8001 Feminist Pedagogy

Days and times: F 10:10a – 12p
Instructors: Lila Abu-Lughod
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Points: 4

This course is oriented to graduate students who are planning to teach in the near and distant future and who want to explore issues related to pedagogy. The course will ask what it means to teach “as a feminist” and will explore how to create a classroom receptive to feminist and queer methodologies and theories regardless of course theme/content. Topics include: the role of political engagement, the gender dynamics of the classroom, and modes of critical thought and disagreement. Discussions can be oriented around student interest. The course will meet several times a month (dates TBD) and the final assignment is to develop a syllabus for a new gender/sexuality course in your field.  Because this course is required for graduate students choosing to fulfill Option 2 for the Graduate Certificate in Feminist Studies at IRWGS, priority will be given to graduate students completing the certificate.

WMST 8010 Advanced Topics: Post Human Feminists

Days and times: Tu 6:10 – 8pm
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext

This course examines the trajectory of feminism and its critical interlocutors as they engage anthropogenic climate change and toxicity. The course begins with an examination of a reorientation of some major thinkers in feminist theory from the problematization of gender and sexuality to problematization of the human and its posts. It then turns to how a reading of anthropogenic climate change and toxicity appears when read from a history of colonialism, racism, capitalism. For most weeks, the course juxtaposes early work of the featured author or other relevant authors. This dual focus seeks to foreground the trajectory, velocity and genealogy of a field and concept.

 

WMST BC 2140 Critical Approaches

Days and times: M/W 4:10pm – 5:25pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 09334
Points: 3

Introduction to key concepts from social theory as they are appropriated in critical studies of gender, race, sexuality, class and nation. We will explore how these concepts are taken up from different perspectives to address particular social problems, and the effects of these appropriations in the world.

WMST BC 3132 Gendered Controversies

Days and times: T 4:10 – 6p
Instructors: Janet R. Jakobsen
Location: TBA
Call number: 05173
Points: 4

Investigates the significance of contemporary and historical issues of social, political, and cultural conflicts centered on women’s bodies. How do such conflicts constitute women, and what do they tell us about societies, cultures, and politics?

WMST BC 3311 Feminist Theory

Days and times: Tu 10:10am – 12pm
Instructors: Tina Campt
Location: TBA

TBA

WMST BC 3512 Art Work

Days and times: W 4:10-6pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 07390
Points: 4

WMST BC 3514 Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions

Days and times: M 4:10 – 6pm
Instructors: Dorothy Yin-Yee Ko
Location: TBA
Call number: 07992
Points: 4

This course will provide students with a comparative perspective on gender, race, and sexuality by illuminating historically specific and culturally distinct conditions in which these systems of power have operated across time and space. In particular, the course seeks to show how gender has not always been a binary or primary category system.  Such approach is also useful in understanding the workings of race and sexuality as mechanisms of differentiation.  In making these inquiries, the course will pay attention to the intersectional nature of race, gender, and sexuality and to strategic performances of identity by marginalized groups.

WMST BC 3526 Senior Seminar II

Days and times: W 4:10-6pm
Instructors: Elizabeth Bernstein
Location: TBA
Call number: 01088
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to senior majors. Individual research in Women’s Studies conducted in consulation with the instructor. The result of each research project is submitted in the form of the senior essay and presented to the seminar.

WMST BC 4302 Jewish Women’s Responses 2nd Wave Fem. 1939-90

Days and times: M 4:10 – 6pm
Instructors: Irena Klepfisz
Location: TBA
Call number: 00295
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 13 students. A study of  Jewish women’s fiction, memoirs, art and film in response to the feminist/gender issues raised by the Second Wave. The seminar includes analysis of the writings and artwork of Jo Sinclair, Tillie Olsen, Judy Chicago, Helene Aylon, Elana Dykewomon, Rebecca Goldstein, E.M. Broner and others.

WMST BC3530 Feminist Media Theory

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Instructors: Jonathan Lyle Beller
Location: TBA
Call number: 08866
Points: 4

The integration of contemporary media and social practices of all types is intensifying. This seminar examines media theory and various media platforms including Language, Photography, Film, Television, Radio, Digital Video, and Computing as treated by feminists, critical race and queer theorists, and other scholars and artists working from the margins.

Crosslisted courses

ANTH UN 1200 The Anthropology of Sexuality

Days and times: M/W 11:40 am – 12:55 pm
Instructors: Carole Vance
Call number: 88944
Points: 3

This course offers a broad overview of the social, cultural, political, and economic dimensions of sexuality. It focuses on the rapid transformations that are taking place globally in the early 21st century, and on the impact that these transformations have had on sexuality. The relationships between men, women and children are changing quickly, as are traditional family structures and gender norms. What were once viewed as private matters have become public, and an array of new social movements (transgender, intersex, sex worker, people living with HIV) have come into the open. Sexuality has become a focus for public debate and political action in important new ways that will be examined in detail in this course.

CLC GU 4110 Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Greece

Days and times: Tu/Th 2:40 pm – 3:55 pm
Instructors: Helene Peet Foley
Location: TBA
Call number: 08631
Points: 3

Prerequisites: sophomore standing or the instructor’s permission. Examination of the ways in which gender and sexuality are constructed in ancient Greek society and represented in literature and art, with attention to scientific theory, ritual practice, and philosophical speculation. Topics include conceptions of the body, erotic and homoerotic literature and practice, legal constraints, pornography, rape, and prostitution.

CLEN GR 6550 The Voice of the Witness: Trauma, Memory, testimony

Days and times: Th 4:10 – 6pm
Instructors: Marianne Hirsch
Location: TBA
Call number: 22799
Points: 4

The historian Annette Wievorka has called our age the “era of the witness.” This course examines the emergence of testimony as a genre and a telling source of evidence in the aftermath of 20th and 21st century catastrophes.  Focusing comparatively on several key sites that illuminate theoretical and gender dimensions of testimony  – war, dictatorship and crimes against humanity as well as rape and sexual abuse – we will study acts of witness in oral history, memoirs, blogs, film, performance and in trials and truth commissions. We will also look at the memorial functions of testimony archives and the role of testimony in museums and memorials.

ECON GU 4480 Gender and Applied Economics

Days and times: M/W 6:10pm – 7:25pm
Instructors: Lena Edlund
Location: TBA
Call number: 72823
Points: 3

Prerequisites: ECON W3211, W3213. This course studies gender gaps, their extent, determinants and consequences. The focus will be on the allocation of rights in different cultures and over time, why women’s rights have typically been more limited and why most societies have traditionally favored males in the allocation of resources.

POLS UN 3912 Gender, Religion and Legal Pluralism

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Instructors: Jean Louise Cohen
Location: 711 International Affairs Building
Call number: 77011
Points: 4

What modes of recognition of religious pluralism and self-government are compatible with democratic constitutionalism and gender equality? In the U.S. and Western Europe, proliferating demands for exemptions from valid general civil law (particularly anti-discrimination law pertaining to gender and sexuality) are made in the name of religious freedom, while in post-colonial contexts, legal pluralism in the field of personal status law—separate jurisdictions for religious/ethnic groups or state enforcement of different personal status laws for different groups– is touted as doing justice to social difference and plurality.  What is the impact on gender equality does deference to religious “nomos groups” by the state have domestically and internationally? What are the politics behind such deference and jurisdictional pluralism? This seminar will analyze the theoretical and political issues from the perspective of theories of democratic legitimacy, liberal and republican constitutionalism and feminism. It will have a theoretical and comparative historical focus, examining western and post-colonial contexts. Among the authors we will read are Mounira Charrad, Will Kymlica, Cecile Laborde, Saba Mahmood,  Mahmood Mamdani, Anne Philipps, Ayelet Shachar, Iris Marion Young, among others.

Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission. Pre-registration is not permitted. Seminar in Political Theory. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Related courses in other departments

AFRS BC 3589 Black Sexual Politics, U.S. Pop Culture

Days and times: T 2:10 – 4pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 08835
Points: 4

Instructor: Celia E. Naylor

Instructor will choose 18 students

EAAS GU 4710 The Woman Question in Modern China

Days and times: W 12:10 – 2pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 60534
Points: 4

Instructor: Gal Gvili

This course explores women in modern and contemporary Chinese fiction using two focal points: the representation of women in fiction, and the voices who write about women. Closely reading narratives by men and women who raised “the woman question” in China from the Mid Nineteenth century and until the Post-Mao era, we aim at understanding: how did “woman” come to dominate the literary imagination of modern Chinese authors? Is there such a thing as female writing? Can only women practice female writing? Our readings will take us chronologically from the early formations of women’s rights as an issue of social importance in China, through the ripening of a substantial feminist discourse and body of literature both committed to putting the figure of “woman” at the center of modernization, revolution, and reform. We will read essays by Chinese feminists, short stories, novellas and novels and pay particular attention to questions of narration, voice, and figuration. Our secondary reading will hone our analytical skills and help us to situate the literary texts within historical and thematic contexts.

HIST BC 2803 Gender and Empire

Days and times: Tu/Th 10:10am – 11:25am
Instructors: Anupama P Rao
Location: TBA
Call number: 01666
Points: 3

HIST BC 2865 Gender and Power in China

Days and times: Tu/Th 2:40 pm – 3:55 pm
Instructors: Dorothy Yin-Yee Ko
Location: TBA
Call number: 07302
Points: 3

This course explores the power dynamics of gender relations in Chinese history and contemporary society. Specifically, we seek to understand how a range of women–rulers, mothers, teachers, workers, prostitutes, and activists–exercised power by utilizing available resources to overcome institutional constraints.

LCRS GU 4500 Feminist and Queer Theory in Brazil

Days and times: T 2:10 – 4pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 70949
Points: 4

Instructor: Miriam Grossi

This course will introduce students to Brazilian gender studies and to feminist and queer theories from the perspective of social studies of science. Readings will combine anthropological, historical and political perspectives about women and LGBT people in Brazil. The course includes classical texts as well as some recent works and new directions. In order for the course to be useful, we will concentrate on texts published in English by Brazilian authors who work on the theme proposed. The course also aims to provide knowledge and access to Brazilian literature and journals. Students are expected to participate actively in the seminar and to engage in a personal project on a topic of choice – either on a literary track (e.g. one author), theory (one theme) or empirical research (e.g. conducting interviews and analysing data).

MUSI UN2500 Women and Music

Days and times: M/W 2:40pm-3:55pm
Location: 622 Dodge Hall
Call number: 67079
Points: 3

Instructor: Alessandra M Ciucci

This course explores the relationship between women, music, and performance from a thematic and a cross-cultural perspective. Through the analysis of different case studies, we will investigate different topics from the perspective of ethnomusicology, cultural anthropology, and performance studies. A number of critical questions we will consider include: how does a particular gender ideology constructs and is constructed by musical aesthetics? What are some of the critical roles for women in performance?  What is the significance of gender in performances? What does it mean for women to have have and to be the voice? And how is a musical performance bound up with emotions?

PORT GR 6114 Mapping Asian/Americas Art

Days and times: M 1:00 – 3:00PM
Instructors: Ana Paulina Lee
Location: 505 Casa Hispánica
Call number: 88977
Points: 4

Students enrolled in this course will receive training in mapping software and analysis from an art history perspective. No prior experience is necessary, but all students will leave with a fluent grasp in working with software that will engage a spatial approach to the study of artistic practice.

Course readings, discussions, site visits and mapping projects will examine how we may map the contours of Asian diasporic artistic practice. By bringing together studies about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and performance with mapping theory about borders and spatial divides, we will explore what constitutes an Asian diasporic artistic practice. We will interrogate the definition of racial and ethnic borders as they intersect with the networks of Asian diasporic spaces and cross national boundaries. Through practicum, we will create and read spatial information as population density or physical borders to see what they may reveal about the density of social relations that cannot be limited to identity. We will question the possibility and stakes of mapping histories of racialization and racial formation. We will test the limits of using data visualization for tracking these kinds of questions. Through using mapping technology, we will create data sets and new archives, and make map-based arguments to see where the constructs of race are produced and destroyed. We will also discuss how the transnational circulation and commodification of race, sexuality, and ethnicity through terms like diasporic art, music, and performance disrupt or reinforce these understandings, and engage in new forms of world-making.

For additional information, contact Professor Ana Paulina Lee, Latin American and Iberian Cultures Department (apl2147@columbia.edu)

RELI UN 3575 Evangelicalism: Sex, Media, and Religion in America

Days and times: T 10:10am-12:00pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 78096
Points: 3

Instructor: Elizabeth F Dolfi

Crossing denominations and encompassing a range of theological commitments, evangelical Christianity can be described as a theological disposition, a mode of hermeneutical practice, a theological-aesthetic sensibility, a mass spiritual movement, a practice of cultivating sacred affect, an errand to the world, and a genre of revivalism. This multidisciplinary seminar will emphasize the role of popular media in constituting an evangelical public, the gendered nature of evangelical subjectivity, the role of sex and sexuality in evangelical self-definition, and the ways that evangelical theological categories have shaped what we think of as “the secular” in the United States.

SOCI UN 3985 Queer Practice

Days and times: T 2:10 – 4:00pm
Instructors: Tey Meadow
Location: TBA
Call number: 29566
Points: 4

Is there a particularly “queer” way to live? Does a queer perspective mitigate for certain forms of social, interpersonal or political action? Are there sets of vocations, engagements or relationship formations that are, in and of themselves, distinctly queer? Or is queerness something that can infuse or transform pre-existing modes of personal or relational action? How does any of this relate to the version of “queer” one learns in college? Is a university education necessary, or even useful, for living a queer life? Does academic queer theory have any relevance to “real-world” politics, affects or activisms? Do classroom projects within Gender & Sexuality Studies prepare us to engage in projects of social change, political efforts, or in any meaningful way, to work more closely with others on shared goals related to social justice? Does a liberal arts education prepare us to navigate ideological, intellectual and interpersonal differences? To move from a critical gaze at social institutions into institutional change? To become more robust citizens of a world that includes a multiplicity of viewpoints, perspectives and values? Finally, at its best, what should the university classroom do to prepare students to forge their own social and political perspectives, and to move from gaze and consideration into movement and action?

Fall 2016

WMST 3200 Queer Theory *New Course*

Days and times: M 2:10 – 4pm
Instructors: Jack Halberstam
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Call number: 80943
Points: 4

This class will ask you to read a set of novels, theoretical essays and social science studies in order to think deeply about sexuality, identity, desire, race, objects, relationality, being, knowing and becoming. We will consider sexuality, desire and gender not as a discrete set of bodily articulations, nor as natural expressions of coherent identities so much as part of the formulation of self that Avery Gordon names “complex personhood.” Beginning with a recent film from the UK that rereads queerness back through a history or labor and ending with a recent film made entirely on the iPhone and that stages queerness as part of an alternative articulation of Hollywood, we will explore new and old theories of queer desire.

Through the readings, discussions, and assignments, you will develop critical analytical skills to consider social change movements with particular attention to how sex, gender, race, class, sexuality, sexual orientation, and other systems of power shape people’s everyday lives. We will trace the intersection of histories of labor, medicine, representation and activism and we will ask difficult questions about assimilation, mainstreaming, globalization and pink capitalism. Advanced undergraduate level course

WMST 3514 Historical Approaches to Feminist Questions:Debates on Women in the Premodern World

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4pm
Instructors: Julie A. Crawford
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Call number: 60596
Points: 4

This class is an introduction to the debates on women that played a dominant role in both the philosophical and literary traditions of the European/Atlantic world from the classical period through the seventeenth-century. Beginning with the works of ancient political theory that actively debated women’s political, social, and ethical position in society (chiefly Aristotle, Plato, and Plutarch), the course will address the pan-European books of “Good Women” that served as exemplary case studies, the querelle des femmes (or debate on women) that dominated political and humanist discourse of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and the crucial importance of the political analogies between the household and the state and the marital and social contracts in the premodern world (and, indeed, in our own).  We will study works from ancient Greece and Rome and medieval and early modern Italy, Spain, France, England, Ethiopia and Mexico, and topics ranging from domestic violence and political resistance theory to transvestitism and lesbianism.

WMST 3521 Senior Seminar I

Days and times: Tu 10:10am – 12pm
Instructors: Katherine Laura Biers
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Call number: 76412
Points: 4

The Senior Seminar in Women’s Studies offers you the opportunity to develop a capstone research paper by the end of the first semester of your senior year. Senior seminar essays take the form of a 25-page paper based on original research and characterized by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of women, sexuality, and/or gender. You must work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of your thesis and who can advise you on the specifics of method and content. Your grade for the semester with be determined by IRWGS’s Director of Undergraduate Studies in consultation with your advisor. Students receiving a grade of “B+” of higher in Senior Seminar I will be invited to complete Senior Seminar II in Spring 2015. Senior Seminar II students will complete a senior thesis of 40-60 pages in a course facilitated by the IRWGS Director.

WMST 3525 Senior Seminar I: Knowledge, Practice, Power

Days and times: T 4:10 – 6p
Instructors: Janet R. Jakobsen
Call number: 08939
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to senior majors. The Senior Seminar in WGSS offers you the opportunity to develop a capstone research project during the first semester of your senior year. The capstone project may be freestanding, or, with permission of the instructor, may be continued during the spring semester as a Senior Thesis.  The capstone project must be based on original research and involve an interdisciplinary approach to the study of women, sexuality, and/or gender. You must work with an individual advisor who has expertise in the area of your project and who can advise you on the specifics of method and content. Your grade for the semester with be determined by the Senior Seminar instructor in consultation with your advisor.

WMST 3600 Race and the Politics of Food *New Course*

Days and times: T 4:10 – 6p
Instructors: Myisha Priest
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Call number: 23336
Points: 4

Description: Who is food for? The simple answer is that food is for everyone, yet a close look at the stories we tell reveals that, actually, food is not for everyone. In our novels, nonfiction, films and even in our manifestoes, some people eat and some provide food; some appetites must be unleashed and others, regulated and controlled; and some people—some people are food. Instead of a benign arena for the imagination and enactment of universal rights, food thus exposes “universal” “human” and “rights” as crucial and deeply contested terrains of raced and gendered power. This economy of exchange, of consumption and deprivation, of the satiation of some bodies through devourment of others, of the invisibility of some hungers and the criminalization of some appetites, are all aspects of our founding narrative. These relations define the past and have also come to define our time. In this seminar, will explore the ways that we imagine food and narrate acts of feeding and eating as a means of examining both the historical enactments and contemporary mechanisms of power.

Through our study of a variety of forms, we will consider how race and gender give shape to representations of food, using its seemingly benign and private face to alter our understanding of where violence and domination reside, how they operate, how they can be resisted, and how or if harm can redressed. Some of the genres we may consider are the novel, the critical essay, the autobiography, the cookbook and more. Our texts will include not only familiar forms but also the neighborhoods of NYC and of course, food itself. By considering questions embedded within these texts how do representations of food uphold or breach the structures of racialized and gendered power? How do these overlooked ways of shaping power affect the way we understand and represent food justice, one of the central struggles of our time? we will stay close to our broader concerns with how the work of political imagining simultaneously enables and forecloses the possibility of community.

WMST 3900 Reading and Writing on the Body in the French Middle Ages *New Course*

Days and times: T 2:10 – 4:00pm
Instructors: Eliza Zingesser
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Call number: 78697
Points: 3

In this course, we will trace representations of the body—monstrous, debased, dissected, and beautiful—through some of the major works of medieval and Renaissance French literature. Along the way, we will encounter changing conceptions of feminine beauty, disjoined body parts, wounded epic heroes and tortured Christian martyrs, animal-human hybrids, cannibals and monstrous creatures. What characterized the corporeality of the medieval hero? How did writers depict themselves and the objects of their desire? When the sexual body “speaks for itself,” as in one of the medieval fabliaux we will read, what does it say and whose desire does it express?

 

WMST 3915 Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective

Days and times: W 4:10-6pm
Instructors: Elizabeth Bernstein
Call number: 02432
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or the instructor’s permission. Considers formations of gender, sexuality, and power as they circulate transnationally, as well as transnational feminist movements that have emerged to address contemporary gendered inequalities. Topics include political economy, global care chains, sexuality, sex work and trafficking, feminist politics, and human rights.

WMST 4000 Genealogies of Feminism: The Subject(s) of Rights

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Instructors: Lila Abu-Lughod
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Call number: 22096
Points: 4

The rights of women and sexual minorities have been central to feminist theory and activism. What is the genealogy of “rights talk”? What is its feminist genealogy? As the liberal language of rights has become hegemonic, in particular through international instruments that have linked women’s and sexual rights to human rights and as liberal reform goes global, what is hidden from view? What understandings are foreclosed? What politics are blocked? This course will examine these key questions by exploring feminist and other critiques of liberal paradigms; considering alternative languages and practices for emancipation, for example, Marxist thought, socialist practice, or Islamic law and its local practices; and reflecting on assumptions about the human embedded in liberalism, including the idea of human development and capability. We will track the issues by focusing in particular on changing approaches to violence against women (VAW) and gender based violence (GBV). This course is open to all graduate students and meets the requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Feminist Studies. Priority will be given to those fulfilling the certificate.

WMST 4200 Temporality and Sexuality *New Course*

Days and times: W 12:10-2pm
Instructors: Jack Halberstam
Location: 754 Schermerhorn Ext
Call number: 94693
Points: 4

If queerness, as José Muñoz put it, “exists for us as an ideality that can be distilled from the past and used to imagine a future,” we can ask about what comes next, what comes after the future? What queer understandings of time and place enliven the field of queer studies now? Where are we going, where have we been, what time is it and when will we get there? Temporality has become a major concern in studies of sexuality and gender in the last decade and this class sets out to explore why and with what impact? How do concerns about time and temporality rest upon assumptions about space and spatiality? How does a focus on time and temporality allow for or foreclose upon post-colonial questions of mimicry, authenticity, sequence and procession? What can a study of queer temporalities reveal about orientations, speed, embodiment, becoming, being, doing, touching, feeling, unbecoming? Finally, what does the focus on temporality allow us to think, say, see or imagine about the multiple points of intersection between race and sexuality in a global frame? Graduate level course

 

WMST 4302 2nd Wave and Jewish Women’s Artistic Responses:1939-1990

Days and times: M 4:10 – 6pm
Call number: 00297
Points: 4

Instructor: Irena Klepfisz

Description: Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 13 students. A study of  Jewish women’s fiction, memoirs, art and film in response to the feminist/gender issues raised by the Second Wave. The seminar includes analysis of the writings and artwork of Jo Sinclair, Tillie Olsen, Judy Chicago, Helene Aylon, Elana Dykewomon, Rebecca Goldstein, E.M. Broner and others.

WMST BC2140 Critical Approaches to Social and Cultural Theory

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40 am – 12:55 pm
Call number: 02265
Points: 3

Introduction to key concepts from social theory as they are appropriated in critical studies of gender, race, sexuality, class and nation. We will explore how these concepts are taken up from different perspectives to address particular social problems, and the effects of these appropriations in the world.

WMST BC2150 Practicing Intersectionality

Days and times: M W 4:10-5:25p
Call number: 05571
Points: 3

This introductory course for the Interdisciplinary Concentration or Minor in Race and Ethnicity (ICORE/MORE) is open to all students. We focus on the critical study of social difference as an interdisciplinary practice, using texts with diverse modes of argumentation and evidence to analyze social differences as fundamentally entangled and co-produced. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this course, Professor Jordan-Young will frequently be joined by other faculty from the Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies (CCIS), who bring distinct disciplinary and subject matter expertise. Some keywords for this course include hybridity, diaspora, borderlands, migration, and intersectionality.

WMST BC3125 Pleasures & Power: Intro. To Sexuality Studies

Days and times: M/W 11:40 am – 12:55 pm
Call number: 07495
Points: 3

Instructor: Alexander Pittman

Description: This introduction to sexuality studies is an examination of the historical origins, social functions, and conceptual limitations of the notion of “sexuality” as a domain of human experience and a field of power relations. Sexuality is often taken to be a natural and unchanging element of individual life. In this course, we seek to examine the ways in which sex is both social and political. We will consider how sexuality has been socially constructed, paying careful attention to the ways these ideas relate to other social forces such as gender, race, and class.

WMST BC3312 Theorizing Women’s Activisim

Days and times: T 2:10 – 4:00pm
Instructors: Janet R. Jakobsen
Call number: 01401
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or Feminist Theory or permission of instructor. Helps students develop and apply useful theoretical models to feminist organizing on local and international levels.  It involves reading, presentations, and seminar reports.  Students use first-hand knowledge of the practices of specific women’s activist organizations for theoretical work.

Crosslisted courses

ANTH G 6125 Language, Culture, & Power

Days and times: Tu 4:10-6pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 17107
Points: 3

This course examines structuralist and pragmatic, post-structuralist and metapragmatic approaches to language and culture and their relevance and availability to the critical analysis of social power.

ENGL 3505 LGBT Literature

Days and times: F 6:10pm-8pm
Instructors: John Robinson-Appels
Location: TBA
Call number: 61796
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission. (Seminar). The poet Cavafy refers to the pursuit of flesh in a different vein than Wilde’s pleasure for pleasure’s sake. Cavafy meant a type of championship of carnal pleasure that would reflect on the relationship of the early naked and oiled Greek Olympian athletes. Is there a distinction between the pursuit of athletic pleasure and comradery, and “non team” sexual sports? We use this frame from Cavafy to interrogate a broad range of 19th, 20th, and 21st century world LGBTQ literature. We will use several theoretical works that enlighten our pursuit, including but not limited to Sedgwick, Foucault, Barthes, Butler, Irigaray, Cixous etcetera. Application instructions: E-mail Professor Robinson-Appels (jr2168@columbia.edu) with the subject heading “Drama, Theatre, Theory seminar.” In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list, from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

FREN 3726 Sex, Class, Shame in 20/21st Century Literature

Days and times: Tu/Th 6:10-7:25
Instructors: Elisabeth A Ladenson
Location: TBA
Call number: 81279
Points: 3

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: completion of FREN W3333 or W3334 and W3405, or the director of undergraduate studies’ permission. The second half of the twentieth century in France saw a sudden explosion of literary works examining, with unprecedented explicitness, sexuality and social class and the relations between them. This course will provide an introduction to the literature of sexual and social abjection, beginning with Genet and Violette Leduc and including works by Annie Ernaux, Christine Angot, Virginie Despentes, and Edouard Louis. We will also consider relevant sociological writings by Bourdieu, Eribon, and Goffman. Readings and discussion will be in French.

ITAL G 4401 Holocaust & Resistance in Italy

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Instructors: Elizabeth Leake
Location: TBA
Call number: 77111
Points: 3

The political, social, and cultural issues affecting Italy in the crucial, dramatic years between 1943 and 1945. More specifically, the canonical literary and cinematic representations of the war, the “Resistenza” and the Holocaust and the aesthetic issues related to the encounter between history and fiction, reality and imagination. Further examination of how the war has affected women: such an inquiry will require the evaluation of lesser-known women’s texts.Topics to be addressed include: war and gender, women as subjects of history, the intersection of the political and the private. Authors to be examined include: Calvino, Fenoglio,Pavese, Levi, Rossellini, Wertmuller, Rosi, Vigano’, Milli, Zangrandi, D’Eramo.

PHIL 2110 Philosophy and Feminism

Days and times: Tu/Th 11:40 am – 12:55 pm
Instructors: Christia Mercer
Location: TBA
Call number: 28635
Points: 3

Is there an essential difference between women and men? How do questions about race conflict or overlap with those about gender? Is there a “normal” way of being “queer”? Introduction to philosophy and feminism through a critical discussion of these and other questions using historical and contemporary texts, art, and public lectures. Focus includes essentialism, difference, identity, knowledge, objectivity, and queerness.  This course will have unrestricted enrollment and no required discussion section.

POLS 3921 American Politics Seminar: Sexuality and Citizenship in U.S.

Days and times: W 4:10-6pm
Instructors: Justin Phillips
Location: 711 International Affairs Building
Call number: 10052
Points: 4

Prerequisites: the instructor’s permission. Pre-registration is not permitted. Seminar in American Politics. Students who would like to register should join the electronic wait list.

Related courses in other departments

AFRS BC3098 Race, Gender, & Sexuality in South Africa

Instructors: Yvette Christianse
Call number: 03338
Points: 3

AFRS BC3134 Unheard Voices: African Women

Days and times: T 2:10 – 4:00pm
Instructors: Yvette Christianse
Location: TBA
Call number: 04111
Points: 4

AFRS BC3550 Gay Harlem

Days and times: M 4:10 – 6pm
Location: TBA
Call number: 01337
Points: 4

Instructor: Tyler T. Schmidt

ENGL W3933 Gender and Sexuality in the Irish Novel

Days and times: M 2:10 – 4pm
Call number: 77398
Points: 4

Instructor: Emily C. Bloom

Description: Irish novelists have long been interested in the correlation between gender and sexuality and issues of religion, class, colonization, revolutionary nationalism, migration, and poverty. When Ireland became the first nation to vote in favor of gay marriage by national referendum in 2015, Irish voters were acutely conscious of their country’s fraught history: years of sexual abuse scandals within the Catholic Church had weakened the hold of the Church on voters and young Irish voters, in particular, now wanted their country to take a progressive lead on the world stage. This course will chart changing attitudes towards gender and sexuality from the nineteenth to the twentieth century in terms of the development of novelistic genres. These genres include marriage plot novels in which the 1800 Act of Union was figured as a marriage between a feminized Ireland and a masculine England, the Big House novel—an Irish variant of the Country House Novel—pioneered by women writers, the gothic novel by writers like Bram Stoker, the modernist novels of James Joyce and Elizabeth Bowen, banned books that were silenced in the repressive environment of the 1950s, and finally the queer Irish novel of the late twentieth century.

 

HIST BC2567 American Women in the 20th Century

Days and times: M/W 10:10am – 11:25am
Instructors: Premilla Nadasen
Call number: 07622
Points: 4

A consideration of women’s changing place in modern America; the “family claim”; women in the workplace; educational expansion; the battle for suffrage; social reformers; the sexual revolution; women in the professions; the crisis of depression and war; the feminine mystique; and the new feminism.

HIST BC3444 Freedom Dreams: US and Beyond

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Instructors: Premilla Nadasen
Call number: 01379
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. This course will interrogate freedom as a conceptual categroy and explore how the meaning and practice of freedom has been deployed in different historical moments. We will consider how gender, race, sexuality, slavery, colonization, work and religion influenced thinking about individual and collective notions of freedom.

HIST BC3870 Gender & Migration: Global Perspectives

Days and times: T 2:10 – 4:00pm
Call number: 09448
Points: 4

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. Preregistration required. Sophomore Standing. Explores migration as a gendered process and what factors account for migratory differences by gender across place and time; including labor markets, education demographic and family structure, gender ideologies, religion, government regulations and legal status, and intrinsic aspects of the migratory flow itself.

HRTS G5404 Human Rights of Women

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4pm
Call number: 66196
Points: 3

HSEA G4888 Women & Gender in Korean History

Days and times: M 4:10 – 6pm
Instructors: Jungwon Kim
Call number: 67220
Points: 4

POLS BC3402 Comparative Politics of Gender Inequality

Days and times: W 2:10-4pm
Call number: 04616
Points: 3

Instructor: Claire F Ullman

Description: Comparative Politics Prerequisites: Not an introductory-level course. Not open to students who have taken the colloquium POLS BC 3507. Enrollment limited to 20 students; L-course sign-up through eBearBarnard syllabus. Uses major analytical perspectives in comparative politics to understand the persistence of gender inequality in advanced industrial states. Topics include: political representation and participation; political economy and capitalism; the historical development of welfare states; electoral systems, electoral quotas; the role of supranational and international organizations; and social policy.

PSYC BC3379 Psychology of Stereotyping and Prejudice

Days and times: M 10:10am- 12:00pm
Call number: 02355
Points: 4

Instructor: Steven Stroessner

SOCI BC3920 Adv Topics Gender & Sexuality

Days and times: Th 2:10pm-4pm
Instructors: Elizabeth Bernstein
Call number: 03537
Points: 4

This research and writing-intensive seminar is designed for senior majors with a background and interest in the sociology of gender and sexuality. The goal of the seminar is to facilitate completion of the senior requirement (a 25-30 page paper) based on “hands on” research with original qualitative data. Since the seminar will be restricted to students with prior academic training in the subfield, students will be able to receive intensive research training and guidance through every step of the research process, from choosing a research question to conducting original ethnographic and interview-based research, to analyzing and interpreting one’s findings. The final goal of the course will be the production of an original paper of standard journal-article length. Students who choose to pursue their projects over the course of a  second semester will have the option of revisiting their articles further for submission and publications.

SOCI BC3935 Gender and Organizations

Days and times: W 4:10-6pm
Call number: 04673
Points: 4

Instructor: Heather Hurwitz

Description: This course examines the sociological features of organizations through a gender lens. We will analyze how gender, race, class, and sexuality matter for individuals and groups within a variety of organizational contexts. The course is grounded in the sociological literatures on gender and organizations.

WMST BC3153 Psychology and Women

Days and times: M 4:10 – 6pm
Call number: 01841
Points: 4

Instructor: Wendy Mckenna

Description: Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing and at least two psychology courses. Permission of the instructor required for majors other than Psychology or Women’s Studies. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Examines how female experience is and has been understood by psychologists. Through an understanding of gender as a social construction and issues raised by the intersections of gender, sexuality, class, and race, the course will analyze assumptions about what causes us to be gendered and about how being gendered affects behavior.

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